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52 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



of the battlefield occupied by the First Long Island and 

Twenty-third and Sixty-first Pennsylvania are proofs I have of 

the gallantry displayed by these regiments. 

Picket lines were established and the regiment went into 

camp to the right of the railroad, its position being on the 

left of the Philadelphia Brig- 
ade of Sumner's Corps. While 
here, on June 7th, it was sent 
to the support of the picket 
lines in front of a brigade of 
the Second Corps. Passing 
through their camps and 
crossing the breastworks, the 
regiment bivouacked for the 
night in the woods, with in- 
structions to sleep on their 
arms. At dawn it moved to 
the edge of a clearing, and 
soon the Rebs charged with a 
yell, driving in the pickets. 
Colonel Neil! would not, how- 
ever, allow the latter to pass 




JACOB HARP, Cos. F. and K. 
Killed at Cold Harbor, June 1, 1864. 



through our lines, compelling them to lie down in front as the 
Johnnies made their appearance on the opposite end of the 
field. As the Rebs attempted to advance no further, the colonel 
ordered Captain John F. Glenn to take Companies A and B 
and re-occupy the picket posts, which command was promptly 
executed. When the detail returned, the regiment was ordered 
back to camp, and on the way out we saw that the whole army 
was in line of battle. The severe picket fight of the early 
morning was no doubt explained as a general advance of the 
enemy, but if so intended it was recalled. 

The regiment remained on the battlefield until the [6th, 
when it was relieved by fresh troops and ordered to a new 
camp on the left of the line, beyond Seven Pines, being con- 
stantly engaged in picket fighting. At the commencement of 
the Seven Days' Fight one wing of the Twenty-third, com- 
posed of Companies A, C, H, I and K, under command of 
Colonel Neill, was posted on the eastern edge of White Oak 
Swamp, to prevent the enemy from turning the left Hank of 
the army then on a retrograde movement to the James River 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



53 



during which it lost several wounded. That night the left wing 
of the regiment, commanded by Captain John F. Glenn, held 
the picket line in White Oak Swamp, while the army passed to 
the rear. This was a most important picket. All night long 
the Army of the Potomac was passing to the rear for the 
purpose of assuming a new position, while the Army of 
Northern Virginia was massing in front for the next day's 
engagement. 

The roar and rumble of both armies could be distinctly 
heard, so close were the picket lines of the contending armies 
that the commands given by one side were easily distinguish- 
able by the other. The anxiety was so great that Colonel 
Glenn, the Field Officer of the day, with the "grand rounds" 
came along about every fifteen minutes. That night the 
countersign was " Austerlitz " and it kept the boys guessing 
what was the word ; the nearest we could get to it was 
" oyster snitz." This wing participated in the opening of the 
Battle of Charles City Cross-Roads, losing several men, and 
after marching all night through 
the dismal shades of the swamps ) 
it arrived at Haxall's Plantation, 
on the James, where the two wings 
of the regiment were united. As 
we marched up the road in the 
direction of Malvern Hill, General 
McClellan and staff passed us, 
being received with the greatest 
enthusiasm. Moving to the top 
of the hill, we participated in the 
action of Turkey Bend, having 
several men wounded. This 
action was fought principally by 
the batteries, Holmes' Division 
having been sent out from Rich- 
mond to secure Malvern Hill. 
( )ur division — Couch's — having 
arrived first with the artillery, 
made the position secure, and, with good battery practice, 
soon drove Holmes off. This was the extreme left of our line 
during the action at Charles City Cross-Roads. On the top 
of the hill, overlooking the valley of the James, was an old 




MAJ.-GEN 1 DON CARLOS BUELL, 
Commanded the Division in 1S61. 



to 

OA'. so, 1 * mf^ 
WRKY 




REGIM1 N l\\l. < OMMANDERS. 



H ISTORY 

^ OF THE 

Twenty Third Pennsylvania 
Volunteer Infantry 

BlRNEYS ZOUAVES 




THREE MONTHS 

AND 

THREE YEARS SERVICE 

Civil War 



1861 



1865 



COMPILED BY THE SECRETARY 

BY ORDER OF THE 

Survivors association Twenty Third regiment 
Pennsylvania volunteers 

1903-1904 



THE NEW YORK 
PttBIIC LIBRARY 

306194B 

ASTO , N -„ 

TILDI 

* I i 



INTRODUCTORY 

«c v i? 

THIS publication is not a history of the Civil War, nor does 
it intend to show how battles should have been fought, 
but is a plain recital of the life of the Twenty-third Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteers, compiled from diaries and personal recollec- 
tions of its survivors, with references from Bates' History of 
Pennsvlvania Volunteers, published by the State of Pennsyl- 
vania, and the United States Rebellion Records. 

Meetings of the various companies have been held from 
time to time, at which not only the history of the regiment has 
been gone over carefully, but the individual record of the 
officers and men, so that a complete and truthful story of the 
old command should appear in this volume. Every effort was 
made to obtain the photos of the officers and men that were 
killed in action, but it was found many never had a photo 
taken, so that of the 126 killed, but 56 photos of those men 
who died, that the nation might live, were secured. 

In addition to these photos it was deemed proper to 
insert the photos of the general officers under whom the com- 
mand served, as well as the Officers and Council of Adminis- 
tration of the Survivors' Organization, and other members of 
the regiment. 

This book is not published to be sold by agents to the 
general public, but for distribution to its survivors and friends 
at its cost value. The Survivors' Association gives due 
acknowledgment to the State of Pennsylvania for its liberality, 
under recent Acts of the Assembly, in its purchase of four 
hundred copies for distribution to the various public libraries. 
Thanks are extended to the survivors of the Old Command 
for their valuable assistance in the preparation of this work of 
love, which the secretarv not only deemed an honor, but a 
pleasant duty in its compilation. 



Endorsement 

Headquarters Survivors' Association, Twenty-third Regiment Penn- 
sylvania Volunteer Infantry. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania., 

December ist, 1903. 

The Association having authorized its Secretary, William J. Wray, "■ 
to prepare a history of the Twenty-third Pennsylvania Volunteer 
Infantry, it is with pleasure that it fully endorses this compilation as a 
faithful, accurate and historically correct history of the command, con- 
taining a complete roster of the organization to date. 

JOHN F. GLENN, President. 



WMmmm 







NICE DAY ON PICKET 




^Vcu^^tr&s 



PRESIDENT HI THE UNITED STATES 
18S1-1865. 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



Twenty-third Pennsylvania Volunteer 

Infantry. 

* -p ■<» 
THREE MONTHS - SERVICE. 

THE War of the Rebellion was formally opened by the 
attack of the rebels in firing upon Fort Sumter, Charles- 
ton harbor. South Carolina, April 12, 1 86 1 . After two days' 
bombardment of the fort, General Anderson, early on the morn- 
ing of April 14th, surrendered the garrison of less than 100 men. 
On April 15th, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United 
States, issued a proclamation, calling for seventy-five thousand 
militia from the several States, to serve a term of three months 
to suppress the rebellion. Pennsylvania furnished her quota of 
fourteen regiments, and this number was further increased to 
twenty-five regiments. Such was the patriotic ardor of the 
people, that the services of about thirty additional regiments, 
tendered by the Keystone State, were refused. No matter 
what side the people took on political questions, they were 
united in the defence of the Union, rallying to the support of 
the Government both by their means and services. 

Under this call for 75,000 men by President Abraham 
Lincoln, the officers and men of the First Regiment Pennsyl- 
vania Militia tendered their services, through Colonel Charles 
P. Dare, to the Governor of Pennsylvania, which was accepted. 
Recruiting began at once on the 1 8th of April, 1861, at the 
Arsenal, Sixteenth and Filbert streets, Philadelphia, where the 
Pennsylvania Railroad train sheds now cover, and on April 
2 ist they were mustered into the United States service by 
Major C. I-'. Ruff, United States Army, as the Twenty-third 
Pennsylvania Volunteers, with the following officers : Colonel, 
Charles P. Dare; Lieutenant-Colonel, David B. Birney ; 
Ma j( ir, George C. Spear ; Adjutant, C. S. Gillingham ; Quarter- 
master, Edwin Palmer; Surgeon, Samuel W. Gross ; Assistant 
Surgeon, C. F. H. Campbell. 

On the evening of the day it was mustered in the regiment 
left for the front. On its arrival at IVrryville, Colonel Dare 
was placed in command at that post. Four companies were 
stationed at IVrryville, two at Havre-de-Grace, two at Elkton, 
one at Bush River, one at Gunpowder River, two at Aberdeen, 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 




LIEUTENANT-GENERAL WINFIELD SCOTT, 
Commanding U. S. Army, 1S61. 



8 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 

with intermediate guards along the roads, it being also engaged 

in guarding the mail from Perryville to Annapolis, Maryland. 

The post and troops at Elkton were under the command 

of Major W. T. Sherman, United States Army, later the dis- 




MAJOK i.l M R \I i.l i 1K1.I II I Mi i.MAS, 
i lommanding the Brigade, Three Mi mi lis s. 1 1 1. . 

tinguished Major General who commanded the Western Army 
who, in command of a light battery, had reported to Colonel 
Dare. There was alsn at 1'enyville under Dare's order a fleet of 
gunboats and transports served by United States seamen 
under immediate command of Lieutenants Steadman and 



rKXNSYI.YANIA YOUNTEER INFANTRY. 



Watmough, United States Navy, both of whom became dis- 
tinguished admirals. 

May 28th, tlie regiment was relieved by the Eleventh 
Pennsylvania, and proceeded by rail to Chambersburg, Penn- 
sylvania, where it was assigned to the First Brigade, First Di- 
vision of Patterson's army, composed of three companies 
Second United States Cavalry (now Fifth Regiment), one 
company Philadelphia City Troop, Battery Heavy Artillery, 
Captain Doubleday, United States Army, who afterwards be- 
came Maj. -General, commanding ist Corps, Army of the Poto- 
mac, Twenty-Third Penn- 
sylvania, Col. Dare; Sixth 
Pennsylvania Volunteers, 
Col. James Nagle; Twenty- 
first Pennsylvania Volun- 
teers, Colonel John F. Bal- 
lier; Twenty-fourth Penn- 
sylvania Volunteers, Col. 
Owens, the brigade being 
in command of Col. George 
H. Thomas, a loyal Virgin- 
ian who was afterwards 
known as the Rock of Chick- 
amauga, commanding the 
Army of Tennessee. The 
Division Commander was 
Major General George Cad- 
wallader, of Philadelphia. 
At Chambersburg,Adjutant 
Gillingham was detailed as 




MAJ.-GEN. ROBERT PATTERSON, 
Of Philadelphia. 
Commanding Army of the Shenandoah, 1S61. 



Acting Assistant Adjutant General on the staff of the brigade 
commander, Colonel Thomas. From Chambersburg the regi- 
ment, with the brigade, marched to Greencastle, where it went 
into camp, remaining about a week. While here the brigade 
was reviewed by Major General Cadwallader, the division com- 
mander, thence it marched to Williamsport, Maryland, where it 
was engaged in guarding the fords on the Upper Potomac. 
The enemy at this time was posted at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 
under the command of General Joseph E. Johnson. When he 
perceived General Patterson's army was about to cross the 
Potomac, he evacuated Harper's Ferry and fell back to Bunker 
Hill. General Patterson, in command of the Department 



10 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



having organized an army of some 12,000 at Chambersburg, 
submitted to General Scott a plan of operation for the reduc 
tion of Harper's Ferry, now held by the enemy. The plan 
having been approved, he receiving the following order : 

* Headquarters of the Army, i 
Washington, June s, i86i. \ 
St>' : — I think your expedition against Harper's Ferry well pro- 
jected and that success in it would be an important step in the War. 

But there must be no re- 
verse. Hence, I have 
given you the best rein- 
forcements within my 
reach, and have just or- 
dered Colonel Hurnside's 
fine Rhode Island regi- 
ment of infantry, with its 
battery ( about twelve hun- 
dred strong ), to proceed 
to Carlisle, and there re- 
ceive your orders. A 
company of the Fourth 
Artillery (to receive its 
horses and battery at Car- 
lisle ), with the battalion 
of the Third Infantry, 
took the same route, and 
with the same instructions, 
5 esterday. 

•' ; I have said that we 
must sustain no reverse; 
but this is not enough. 
A check or a drawn battle 
would be a \ ictory t< > the 
enemy, filling his heart with joy, his ranks with men, and his maga- 
zines with voluntary contributions. 

Take your measures, therefore, circumspectly ; make a good use 
of your engineers and other experienced staff olticers and generals 
and attempt nothing without a clear prospect of success, as you will 
find the enemy strongly posted and not inferior to you in numbers. 
With entire confidence in your valor and judgment, 
I remain your brother soldier, 

\V1\1 11 1 d Scott. 
Major ( ieneral Patterson, 

United States Forces. 




ANDREW G. CURTIN, 
Wai 1 .uvenior of Pennsylvania, 



P] NNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. II 

On June 17th, the regiment, with Colonel Thomas' brigade, 
crossed the Potomac and advanced to Falling Waters in 
pursuit of the enemy, Cadwallader's entire division being 
ordered to follow. At this juncture the Regular cavalry and 
all the artillery, together with the brigade commander, Col- 
onel Thomas, were by command of General Scott, then com- 
mander oi all the armies, ordered to Washington. 

Teleg'rams from General Scott to General Patterson. 

Washington, June 16, 1861. 
To Major General Patterson: The regulars with you are most 
needed here; send them and the Rhode Island regiment (Colonel 
Burnside 1 as fast as disengaged. 

Winfield Scott. 



Washington, June 17, 1861. 
To Major General Patterson : We are pressed here. Send the 
troops I have twice called for without delay. 

Winfield Scott. 

This left three regiments and City Troop, one company, 
under Colonel Dare menacing the enemy, with orders to 
recross the river the next day. At daylight the retreat com- 
menced with a large body of rebel cavalry hovering on the 
Hanks and rear of the columns, recrossing the river without an 
engagement, going into camp at Williamsport. 

Testimony of General Cadwallader before the Congres- 
sional Committee on Conduct of War : " My division, as a part 
of General Patterson's column, was in the advance. I crossed 
the Potomac from Williamsport, and when Johnson retreated 
as we advanced upon Harper's Ferrv, we went down as far as 
Falling Waters, on the Virginia side. I was there met by an 
order to send to Washington all my regular troops. They 
were all under my command. General Patterson 

was compelled, or rather induced, to give me the order to fall 
back.'' 

General Patterson, in his narrative of the campaign in the 
Valley of the Shenandoah, page 36, says of his part of the 
campaign : 

" I was mortified and humiliated at having to recross the 
river without striking a blow. I knew that mv reputation 
would be grievously damaged by it ; the country could not 



12 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



understand the meaning of this crossing and recrossing, this 
marching and countermarching in the face of the foe, and that 
I would be censured without stint for such apparent vascilla- 
tion and want of purpose." 

Two days afterwards the cavalry and artillery were 
returned and Colonel Thomas again assumed command of the 



MM^ 










DELIVKRING PAPERS. 



brigade. The Twenty-third remained at Williamsport until 
ordered to Downsville, but, the river being ton high, it 
returned to Williamsport July 2d, when it again crossed the 
Potomac with the entire command of General Patterson. 
Advancing to Falling Waters, fire was opened upon the head 
of the column by a body of rebels concealed in a wheat field 

and \v Is. During the skirmish the regiment supported 

Perkins' Battery. The enemy were driven off. Advancing 
the next day to Martinsburg, four companies were detailed 
under Major Spear for provost duty. < m the Fourth of July 
the brigade was drawn up on dress parade, Perkins' Battery 
firing a salute, and regimental bands playing national airs in 
honor of the Nation's birthday. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOU'NTKKK INFANTRY. 



13 



The column again advanced to Hunker Hill, the Twenty- 
third being sent on three different occasions with the cavalry 
on reconnoissance. On July 17th the entire column marched 
to Charlestown, Va., a detail from the regiment patroling the 
town. 

Its term of service having expired, it was ordered to 
Philadelphia, where it arrived on July 24th and on July 31st 
was mustered out of service. 

It received the commendation of the commanding general 
for its discipline and soldierly conduct, being the first regiment 
from Philadelphia that left that city with uniforms and arms, 
being supplied with but five rounds of ammunition. Nearly 
the entire regiment re-enlisted, and was permitted to retain 
its old number, Twenty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers. 




'^.P^^r 



AKiil'XD THE BIVOUAC FIRE. 



14 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



23D PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEERS 

THREE MONTHS' SERVICE. 
V» >? ^ 

FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS 



Name. 


Rank. 


Remarks. 


Charles P. Dare . . 
David B. Birney . 
George C. Spear 
C. S. Gillingham . 
Edwin Palmer . . 
Samuel W. Gross . 
C. I". H. Campbell 




Colonel . . . 
Lieut.-Col. . . 
Major .... 
Adjutant . . . 
(Juartermaster. 
Surgeon . . . 
Asst.-Surg. . . 


Re-enlisted Colonel, 23d P. V. 
Re-enlisted Major, 23d P. V. 

Re-enlisted Captain, 23d P. V. 



COMPANY A 

Recruited at Philadelphia. Mustered in April 21, 1S61. Mustered out July 31, 1S61. 



George C. Spear . 
George W. Sheets . 
John G. Divine . . 
William F. Powell . 
Samuel R. Poulson 
Joseph R. Slaughter 
Wm. Cunningham 
Wm. M. McGrath . 
Thomas Madigan . 
Jonathan Neall . . 
Robert K. Selkirk . 
James C. Andrews 
James B. Camac . 
Aldrick, Geo. W. 
Blanck, William 
Barford, Richard S. 
Barford, Thomas P. 
Blair, Andrew . . 
Barford, Jacob P. . 
Boyd, John ... 
Bolton, John A. . . 
Bolton, William P 
Camac, William T. 
Campbell, John 
Cheesman, George 
Cornwall, Joseph . 
Donaghy, William 
Devine, Samuel ' '■. 
F.dwards, William I. 
(•'.wing, William 
Ford, I li-nry . . . 
1 rouldy, Harry . . 
1 .cjuldy. Joseph < '. 

Gilligan, Charles . 
( iallagher, And I . 
< rovett, Lewis W. 
( iraham, Christophi i 
( ireen, James . . 
Hansell, Amos . 
Hansell. Thomas 



Captain 
First Lieut. . 
Second Lieut. 
First Sergt. . 
Second Sergt. 
Third Sergt. 
Fourth Sergt. 
First Corp. . 
Second G 
Third Corp 
Fourth Corp 
Musician 

Private 



Promoted to Major. 



Re-enlisted Co. E, 23d P. Y 



Re-enlisted Co. I, 2d Pa. Heavy Art. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



to 



N \ M I 



Hoyt. William A. 
I lun/en, Charles 
I [usbands, I lenry M 
Johnston, Adam B. 
Johnston, James I. 
Johnston, Robert . 
Jones, John .... 
Keene, Arthur F. . 
Keene, Robert M. 
Kendricks, Samuel 
Kinsley, Daniel . . 
Kinsley, William 1 1. 
Kiker, William . . 
Loughery, Edw. P. 
Long, Andrew . . 
Long, Samuel . . 
McCarter, William 
Mcllhenny, Bernard 
McGowan, Edward 
McGonigal, John 
McNeil, David . . 
McGrath, Isaac (',. 
McManus, Henry . 
McElwee, John . . 
Martin, Sylvester H, 
Miller, William . . 
North, George W. 
Rodgers, Andrew I. 
Surplice, Thomas . 
Stokes, Isaac F. . . 
Stevenson, Walter 
Sanderson, Robert 
Torbett, Henry . . 
Vandyke, Albert 
Willoeby, George . 
Wright, James M. . 
Wagner, Adam . . 



Private 



Re-enlisted Co. E, 23d P. V. 



Re-en. KegtI. Q. M. Sergt., 23d P. V. 



Ke-enlisted Co. K, 8Sth P. V. 

I Re-enlisted Co. K, ;2d P. V. Killed 
\ at Gettysburg, July 3, 1S63. 

Re-enlisted Co. F, 23d P. V. 



Re-enlisted Co. K, 8Sth P. V. 

Re-enlisted Co. I, 20th Pa. Militia. 
Re-enlisted Co. F, 23d P. V. 



Re-enlisted Co. E, 23d P. V, 



COMPANY B 

Recruited at Philadelphia. Mustered in April 21, 1S61. Mustered out July 31, 1S61. 



John F. Glenn . . 
Chas. W. Matthews 
J. P. W. Neill . . . 
George W. Nagle . 
Henry G. Fritz . . 
Reuben B. Thomas 
J. Dorsey Ash . . . 
William B. Foster . 
William G. Roberts 
Solomon Forbaugh 
Geo. W. Sloanaker 
Harper Smith . . . 
Hamilton, Smith 
Albertson, Levi B 
Atkinson, Robert . 
Berg, John D. . . . 
Barnes, Reuben 
Brisbing, Theodore 
Brabender, E. A. . 
Bates, George . . 
Brickham, Caleb 



Captain . . 
First Lieut. . 
Second Lieut 
First Sergt. . 
Second Sergt 
Third Sergt. 
Fourth Sergt. 
First Corp. . 
Second Corp. 
Third Corp. 
Fourth Corp 
Musician 



Private 



Re-enlisted Captain, Co. A, 23d P. V, 



Re-enlisted Co. A, 23d P. V. 

Re-en. Kevstone Bat. Pa. Light Art. 
Re-enlisted Co. A, 23d P. V. 

Re-enlisted Co. A, 23d P. V. 



Re-enlisted Co. R, 23d P. V. 

Re-enlisted Co. A, 23d P. V. 
Re-enlisted Co. A, 23d P. V. 

Re-enlisted Co. A, 23d P. V. 



16 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



Name. 



Burt, Franklin 
Couden, R. C. 
Clark, Allen . 
Collins, James 
Cook, Harry 
Canell, Edward 
Campbell Peter 
Costello, John 
DeGroot, John 
Depec, Albert 
Davenport, Robt. A 
Davis John W. . 
Eastwick, R. . . 
Fitzinger, Geo. W 
Fowler, \Y. A. 
Gwynn, David 
Hasson, John F. 
Hyer, Jacob . . 
Hennesey, Alfred J 
Hilton, William F 
Hahn, John K. . 
Johnson, Henry . 
Jacoby, John B. . 
Kater, Samuel 
Kawson, William 
McCormick, Michael 
McClelland, Robert 
Murray, Charles 
McCully, Hugh . . 
Morgan, Daniel P. 
Maguigan, Francis J 
Moore, George W. 
Morris, Frederick . 
Martin, James . . 
Noble, James . . . 
Nichols, Talbot X. 
Newberg, R. C. . . 
Osborne, J. G., Jr. 
Pyle, Samuel 1 1. . 
Parker, Cyrus . . 
Patterson, H. . . . 
Redifer, Benjamin 
Ruths, Frederick . 
Rague, Thomas . . 
Smith, Henry L. . 
Stackhouse, Charles 
Schi-n, Charles . . 
Schutretter, ("has. . 
Stengle, Philip . . 
Sullivan, I'. . . . 
Tinsman, John 1.. . 
Turner, William 1 1. 
Tobin, Francis . . 
Will, Samuel . . . 
Wakefield, Chas. II. 



Remarks. 



Private 



Re-enlisted Co. A, 23d P. V. 
Re-enlisted Co. A, 2*d P. V. 



Re-enlisted Co. C, nth Pa. Cavalry. 

Re-enlisted Co. A, 23d P. V. 

Re-enlisted Co. A, 23d P. Y. 
Re-enlisted Co. A, 23d P. Y. 



Re-enlisted Co. A, 23d P. V. 
Re-enlisted Co. F, 72d P. V. 
Re-enlisted Co. A, 23d P. V. 
Re-enlisted Co. A, 23d P. Y. 
Re-enlisted Co. A, 23d P. Y. 



Re-enlisted Co. A, 23d P. Y. 
Re-enlisted Co. A, 23d P. Y. 
Re-enlisted Co. A, 23d P. Y. 
Re-enlisted Co. A, 23d P. Y. 
Re-enlisted Co. A, 23d P. Y. 
Re-enlisted Co. A, 23d P. V. 



Re-enlisted Co. A, 23d P. V. 
Re-enlisted Co. E, 1st X. J. Cavalry. 



Re-enlisted Co. A, ?y\ P. Y. 
Re-enlisted Co. A, 2y\ I'. Y. 



Re-enlisted Co. A, 23d I'. Y 
Ri enlisted ( )o. A. 23d P. Y 

IV Cllllstl-il ' n. \. 23d P. Y 



COMPANY C 
Recruited at Philadelphia. Mustered in April 11,1861 Mustered out Jul) 



William I'.arr . . . 
Edw. S. Redsteal - 
1 ) mi.! N, Malseed 
Charles Smith . . 



Captain . . 
First Lieut, . 
Second Lieut. 
First Si 1 1 



PENNSYLVANIA YOLCNTEER INFANTRY. 



17 



Rank. 



Kl MARKS. 



Andrew Malseed . 

Edward Cheesman 
Job T. Hickman . 
Thomas C. Wright 
Alexander Gardner 
John H. Landon . 
Michael Woods . . 
John Woods . . . 
James Woods . . . 
Arbuckle, John . . 
Bonner, James . . 
Brown, Abner . . 
Bastian, Jacob . . . 
Beatty, William . . 
Ball, Israel Y. . . 
Ball, Israel R. . . 
Berriman, Richard 
Carrow, Lewis F. . 
Cooper, James F. . 
Callen, Samuel . . 
Colton, Charles . . 
Cozens, Smith D. . 
Collins, Joseph . . 
Crap, Robert M. 
Dickson, Charles W 
Devitt, Charles H. 
Davis, John T. . . 
Dyer, Francis . . . 
Ervien, Robert C. . 
Flanigan, John . . 
Fogarty, William . 
Frank, John . . . 
Garrison, Samuel . 
Howard, Russell . 
Hooper, James E. . 
Hawkins, Joshua B 
Hugg, George H. . 
Hamilton, John . . 
Huggs, Andrew C. 
Jones, Thomas . . 
Jefters, John . . . 
Johnson, John G. . 
Lowther, John G. . 
Laws, Charles A. . 
Lentz, August . . 
Kepler, Charles . . 
Mann, William . . 
Morton, Oscar G. . 
Myers, Thomas . . 
Mulligan, Patrick H 
Mehaffey, George . 
Mann, Charles . . 
Marsh, Henry . . . 
Martin, Charles . . 
Ogilby, Edward F. 
O'Neil, Peter . . . 
Patrick, Samuel . . 
Patton, Charles . . 
Palmore, Stephen . 
Quinn, Bernard . . 
Quinn, James . . . 
Richardson. William 
Robinson, John . . 
Smith, Kember . . 



Second Sergt 
Third Sergt. 
Fourth Sergt, 
F'irst Corp. 
Second Corp 
Third Corp. 
F'ourth Cori 
Musician 



Private 



Re-enlisted Co. H, 23d P. V. 
Re-enlisted Lieut., Co. G, SSth P. Y. 



Re-enlisted Co. A, 6th U. S. Cavalry. 



Re-enlisted 15th Pa. Cavalry. 



Re-enlisted Co. H, 23d P. V. 



Re-enlisted Co. I, 23d P. V. 



Re-enlisted Co. H, 23d P. Y. 



Re-enlisted Co. P, 23d P. Y. 



Re-enlisted Co. H, 23d P. Y. 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REC.IMENT 



Schaffer, Anthony . 
Sigman, Jacob . . 
Sigman, John . . . 
Stephens, George K 
Sigman, Houston . 
Tallafield, Charles 
Thompson, Richd. S 
Till. Charles . . . 
Wells, John M. . . 



I'riv 



Re-enlisted Co. H, 23d P. V. 



Re-enlisted U. S S. Tahoma. 
Re-enlisted Co. K, 23d P. V, 



COMPANY D 

Recruited at Philadelphia. Mustered in April 21, 1861. Mustered out July ji, [861 



1 liram Kirk Spear . . 
Wm. P. M. Penningt'ii 
John W. Crosby . . 
John Wallace . . . 
William Marfelius . 
Edmond Patterson 
John M. Watt . . . 
Henry Schaffer . . 
John R. Hampton . 
John G. Brass . . 
Francis Clark . . . 
Henry Duerford . . 
Mathew lilack . . 
Adams, John . . . 
Action, Nathaniel . 
Barnes, John . . . 
Bothwell, James 
I'.urk, Edward 1 >. . 
Clemens, William K. 
Clark, Samuel . . 
Cooper, William I!. 
Donegan, Augustine I 
Erwin, William . . 
Ennis, John .... 
Fields, John .... 
Fry, Thomas . . . 
Gablance, William 
< iallagher, Thomas 

< iamble, James . . 
( '.orui.in. Thi unas . 

< ireen, Jacob . . . 
Gross, Chandler . . 
I laines, John . . . 
I [emple, James 

I [ethington, fames R 
Heberly, Daniel B. 
Htieoly, Joseph . . 
Hogan, John J. . . 
Kane, John .... 
Kelly, William . . 

Kendrick, William 
I .ayer, I [enry . . 
Lindsay, Andrew J. 
Long, Andrew . . 

Mi \nally. James 

Mi 1 lalister, John 
Mi < aulej , I taniel 
Mi 1 auley, Thomas 
Mi 1 rinis, lames 



Captain . . 
First Lieut. -. 
Second Lieut. 
First Sergt. 
Second Sergt. 
Third Sergt. 
Fourth Sergt. 
First Corp. . 
Second Corp. 
Third Corp. 
Fourth Corp. 
Musician 



Private 



Re-enlisted Co. P, 23d P. V, 



Re-enlisted Co. F, 23d P. V. 

Re-enlisted Co. I, 2d Pa. Heavy Art. 
Re-enlisted Co. P, 2,y\ P. V. 
Re-enlisted Co. P, 23d P. V. 



Re-enlisted Co. P, 23d P. V, 
Re-enlisted Co. F. 23d P. V 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



19 



lvl \1 \KkS. 



Met .inis, John . . 
Mi Kain, Janus . 

McCready, John . . 

Mm oil, John . . . 
McConnell, William 

Mackin, I lenry . . 

Moran, Kane . . . 

Morris, Charles . . 

M e, |ohn . . . 

Nutt, ]ames ... 
O'Neill, Harry . . 
Paulein, Jacob L. 
l'ius, Alexander . 
Si hatha , Benjamin 
Si naffer, I leni \ 
Shane, Edward . . 
Spencer, John II. . 
Stewart, John . . . 
Su ink, Charles . . 
Slanter, Daniel . . 
Tripner, i ieorge C. 
Tully, Joseph M. . 
Wardlaw, Samuel . 
Watts, David . . . 
Wells, John . . . 
Wilson, John . . . 
Wallace, Thomas . 
"\ arnall, Benjamin . 



Private 



Re-enlisted Co. E, 23d I'. Y 



Re-enlisted Co. A, 1'. Y. 
Re-enlisted Co. 1', 23d I'. V, 



COMPANY E 

Recruited at Philadelphia. Mustered in April 21, 1861. Mustered out July 31, 1861. 



|ohn W. Hofmann . 
William J. Wallace 
Andrew Brown . . 
Martin B. Hillier . 
Francis Dougherty 
George Robertson 
s.nnucl A. McFalls 
William Kearney . 
Lewis A. Blair . ■ 
Joshua Harrison 
Robert McMillan . 
George Kernick . . 
Samuel McClelland 
Alexander, James . 
Arbushunt, James . 
Black, William D. . 
Biggot, John . . . 
Burk, John . . . . 
Brown, William . 
Briggs, Amos . . • 
Brooks, Joseph . 
Burke, John 2nd . . 

Bardie, I 

Cornwall, John . . 
Clark, William . . 
Doak, Robert . . . 
Duddy, James . . 
Fleming, William . 
Fagan, Edward . . 
Fow, Daniel . . . 



Captain . . 
First Lieut. . 
Second Lieut. 
First Sergt. . 
Second Sergt. 
Third Sergt. 
Fourth Sergt. 
First Corp. . 
Second Corp. 
Third Corp. . 
Fourth Corp. 
Musician . . 

Private . . . 



Re-enlisted Lieut. Colonel. 56th 1'. V. 
Re-enlisted Captain, Co. E, 23d I'. V. 

Re-enlisted Lieut., Co. E, 23d P. Y. 



Re-enlisted Lieut., Co. A, 56th I'. Y. 
Re-enlisted Co. E, 23d P. V. 



Re-enlisted Co. E, 23d P. Y. 



Re-enlisted Co. E, 23d P. Y. 
Re-enlisted Co. E, 23d P. Y. 

Re-enlisted Co. E, 23d P. Y. 

Re-enlisted Co. E, 23d P. Y. 



20 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



Name. 



Remarks. 



Goodwin, Thomas ] 
Glenn, William . 
Gordon, Robert . 
Hance, George . 
Higgins, Charles 
Harris, Thomas . 
Harrison, Stephen 
Hazlett, John . . 
Hazlett, Matthew- 
Hayes, Robert . 
Johnson, Robert 
Kearney, John 
Kain, Samuel . . 
Leeby, William 
Moore, John . 
Miller, John . . . 
Morgan, John . 
Marshall, F. . . 
McNally, Thomas 
McNeil, John . . 
McCongle, Robert 
McClung, James . 
McFall, William 
McYey, Hugh 
McClung, John . 
McCanneck, Neil 
McKinney, Hugh 
McClelland, John 
McConnell. Charles 
McKeown, Thomas 
McMichael, Hugh . 
Pruser, Spencer . . 
Quinn, John . . . 
Rankin. Alexander 
Ralston, Joseph . 
Rumford, Samuel . 
Redmin, William . 
Scholes, John . . . 
Simpkins, Beeford 
Simpkins. Edwin T. 
Stuart, John . . 
Sanderson. James 
Taylor, James 
Tate, Hugh . . . 
Tate, Henry . . 
Waters, John . . 
Wilson, Samuel . 



Private 



Re-enlisted Co. E, 23d P. V 



Re-enlisted Co. E, 23d P. V, 



Re-enlisted Co. E, 23d P. V, 
Re-enlisted Co. E, 23d P. V, 
Re-enlisted Co. E, 23d P. V. 

Re-enlisted Co. E, 23d P. V, 
Re-enlisted Co. E, 23d P. V, 

Re-enlisted Co. E, 23d P. V. 
Re-enlisted Co. E, 23d P. V, 
Re-enlisted Co. E, 23d P. V, 
Re-enlisted Co. E, 23d P. V, 

Re-enlisted Co. E, 2«1 P. V, 



Re-enlisted Co. E, 23d P. V. 
Re-enlisted Co. E, 23d P. V. 



Re-enlisted Co. E. 
Re-enlisted Co. E, 



23d P. 
23d P. 



P. V 



Re-enlisted Co. E, 23d P. V. 
Re-enlisted Co. E, 23d P. V, 
Re-enlisted Co. E, 23d P. V, 



Recruited at Philadelphia. 



COMPANY F 

Mustered in April 21, [861. 



Mustered out July 31, lS6t. 



J. Keenside White . . 
George P. Anderson. 
Edward N. McDonald 
John Hunterson . 
1 b-nry Copestick 
William Langdon 
John Parks . . . 
Alexander P< >u ill 
Morris Idell . . . 
1 :■■• iree Savius 
Charles Nunneville 
James Smith . . 
Joseph Bradwix 



Captain . . 
First Lieut. 
Second Lieut. 
First Sergt. . 
Second Sergt. 
Third Sergt. 
Fourth Sergt. 
First Corp. 
Second Corp. 
Third Corp. 
Fourth 1 orp 
Musician 



Re-enlisted Co. F. 23d P. V, 



Re-enlisted Co. F, 2-,d P. V, 



Re-enlisted Co. II, 23d P. V, 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



21 



Kt:\t \KKS. 



Akt-r, Charles . 
Hikings, John . 
Border, Frederick \\ 
Bolton, David . . 
Brown, John . . . 
Bishop, William . 
Brisburn, James 
Butcher, John . . 
-r, Joseph. . 
Cuthbert, William 
Clark, William . 
ipy, Patrick 
Cortete, James . 
Campbell, James . 
Charlton, Fred. K. 
I tevlin, Arthur . . 
I (anenhower, Geo. B 
1 teal, Samuel . . 
Endy, Frank . . . 
Edward, Joseph . 
Evans, Lewis . 
Fogle, Charles . 
l-'reas, George W. 
Fulton, William 
Farley, Edward 
Gerhart, Charles . 
Garret, George . 
Grelsinger, Jacob . 
Gorman, Joseph 
Gentle, Henry . 
Haslam, Charles . 
Hotz, John .... 
1 Iarp. Jacob . . . 
Hofnagle, Fred. K 
Howard, John . . 
llson, Richard . . 
Kipple, Jacob . . 
Kelly. John 
Ligtitcap, Charles 
McCrully, Lawrence 
Maguire, Joseph . 
Malin, Wilson . . 
Morly, Thomas . 
Moore, Charles D 
Minnick. Henry . . 
Montgomery, Hugh 
McCloskey, Chas. G 
Mci lool, John . . . 
Mel longal, Alex. . 
Masland, Charles H. 
Masland, James W. 
Nunneville, George. 
Oliver, William. 
( ('Neil, James . 
Purvis, Hugh . . . 
Poulterer, Stephen . 
Rohrer, Joseph . . 
Seidt, Adolph . . . 
Umstead, Thomas . 
Yogel, Lewis. . . . 
Wartman, Geo. W. 
Watson. John . . . 
Whiteman, William. 
Young, Charles W. 



Private 



Re-enlisted Co. F, 13d P. V 
Re-enlisted Co. C, 23d P. V. 



Re-enlisted Co. F, 23d P. Y 

Re-enlisted Co. F, 23d P. V. 
Re-enlisted Co. F, 23d P. V. 

Re-enlisted 23d P. V. 



Re-enlisted Co. F, 23d P. V. 



Re-enlisted Co. F, 231! P. V, 



Re-enlisted Kevstone Bat.. Pa. L. Art. 



22 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



COMPANY G 

Recruited at Philadelphia. Mustered in April 21, 1861. Mustered out July 31, 1861. 



N \ Ml 



James Gwyn . . . 
Lewis D. Baugh . 
George Wood . . 
Charles W. Cares 
George Howard . 
Edward H. McMillan 
Mark Anthonv . 
Richard A. McMillan 



Robert B. Beath 



Andrew C. White . 
John P. Anthony . . 
William H. Adams . 
William Anderson . 
Atkinson, Benjamin 
Anthony, William H 
Alexander, Hugh . 
Addey, Matthew . . 
Boullen, Frederick S 
Ball, Henry T. . . . 
Barnes, George W. 
Barr, William . . 
Bodkin, Robert . 
Butz, Jacob . . , 
Campbell, John . 
Cunningham, JamesT 
Cridlend, John . . . 
Collins, William H. 
Collins, Robert . . 
Coughlan, Michael J 
Cline, John .... 
Campbell, William . 
Dunnecliffe, Edward 
Davin, Joseph . . . 
Dougherty, Hugh . 
Earl, James .... 
Fllingsworth, Samuel 
Fisher, Joseph . . . 
Gowan, Edward . . 
Galloway, Henry. . 
Hoopes, Francis E. D 
I lenry, James . . . 
I larvey, Edward B. 
Hart, Samuel C. . . 
I follows, 1 linson . 
I [elpin, James . . . 
1 [arrigan, fames . . 
Hecht, Gottleib . . 
Kenworthy, Thomas 
Kilpatrick, John 1 1. 
McLaughlin, Michael 
McCoy, Henry. . . 
Meighan, William . 
Matthews, James . . 
McKinsey, John . . 



Rank. 



Captain . . 
First Lieut. . 
Second Lieut. 
First Sergt . 
Second Sergt. 
Third Sergt. 
Fourth Sergt. 
First Corp. . 



Second Corp. 



Third Corp. 
Fourth Corp 
Musician 



Private 



Re-enlisted Captain Co. F, 23d P. V. 
Re enlisted Captain Co. D, 23d P Y. 

Re-enlisted Co. D, 23d P. Y. 

[ Promoted to Sergeant ; re-enlisted 
Co. D, 88th P.Y. ; promoted 2d 
Lieut.; appoint'd Capt. Co. A, 6th 

J U.S.C. Infantry; com. Lt.-Col. : 
not mustered ; wounded ( loss of 
foot) Chapins Farm, Sept. 21, '64; 

I discharged Sept. 29, 1865. 

Re-enlisted Co. D, 23d P. V. 



Re-enlisted Co. F, 23d P. V. 
Re-enlisted Co. D, 23d P. Y. 



Re-enlisted Co. D, 23d P. Y. 
Re-enlisted Co. D, 2}d P. Y. 
Re-enlisted Co. F, 23d P. Y. 



Re-enlisted 231! P. Y 



Re-enlisted Co. F, 23d P. V. 
Re-enlisted Co. O, 23d P. V. 

Re-enlisted Co. E, 23d P. Y. 



Re-enlisted Co. D, 23d P. Y. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



23 



Remarks. 



McFadden, James 
O'Colligan. John 
Pilkinton, George 
Richardson. John 
Reilly, Charles F. 
Ryan, Robert . 
Reem, John . . 
Steele, William . 
Steen, Andrew . 
Speer, Morris . 
Snyder, Amos . 
Shaw. William 
Spellman, James 
Schoen, David 
Stump, John . 
Salmon. William 
Simmons, Samuel 
Thorp, Frank 
Taylor, John 
Thompson, L. R 
Yonfleet. John 
Wiley, Samuel 
Wolf, Thomas M 



Private 



Re-enlisted Co. F, 23d P. V. 

Re-enlisted 2d Pa. Heavy Artillery. 
Re-enlisted Co. D, 23d P. V. 



Re-enlisted Co. G, 23d P. V. 

Re-enlisted Co. D, 23d P. V. 
Re-enlisted 23d P. V. 

Re-enlisted Co. D, 23d P. V. 



Re-enlisted Co. D, 23d P. V. 



COMPANY H 

Recruited at Philadelphia. Mustered in April 21, 1861. Mustered out July 31, 1861. 



J. Joseph Yaughan 
William Blanck . 
Thomas K. Boggs 
George Reynold 
Thomas W. Griffin 
J. Dow Carlisle 
James Nethery 
Samuel Humes 
Henry Maser . 
John H. Chambers 
Edwin Garvin . . 
George Blanck . 
William J. Kern . 
Arrowson, Jacob 
Brown, Charles . 
Beeler, Evan . . 
Bowers, Yalentine 
Brown, Thomas B 
Bayne, Edward B 
Clark, Clement . 
Campbell, James 
Cook, Joseph . . 
Dace, Edward P 
Davis, Isaac . . 
Ettenger, Martin H. 
Farrell, Alexander 
Fisher, James 
Feeney, John . 
Fredericks, Geo. B. 
Forman, John W 
Field, W. H. . . 
Gallen, James F. 
Hunter, David . 
Hess, William 



Captain . . 
First Lieut. . 
Second Lieut. 
First Sergt. . 
Second Sergt. 
Third Sergt. 
Fourth Sergt. 
First Corp. . 
Second Corp. 
Third Corp. 
Fourth Corp 
Musician 



Private 



Re-enlisted Lieut., Co. C, 23d P. Y. 



Re-enlisted Co. B, 23d P. V. 



Re-enlisted Co. C, 23d P. V. 



Re-enlisted Co. H, 23d P. V. 



Re-enlisted Co. A, 23d P. V. 

Re-enlisted 2^d P. V. 
Re-enlisted Co. F, 150th P. V. 



24 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



Name. 



Hill, John H 

Howe, John .... 
Knox, Joseph .... 
Kole, James I. . 
Keene, Henry F. . . 
Lindsay, William H. 
Lundback, Silas P. . 
Lippincott, George W. 
Lindsay, I. M. . • • 
Matthews, James A. . 
Montgomery, William 
Musgrave, James . . 
Moore, Thomas . . . 
Morad, Peter .... 
McGuire, James . . . 
McCarty, Patrick . . 
McCrossin, John . . 
McGraw, Michael . . 
Naedgle, Morris T. . 
Pedrick, Daniel H. . 
Philbut, Alexander . 
Renninger, Danl. A. . 
Rea, Francis D. . . 
Rudolph, Samuel T. 
Richards, Andrew I. 
Stanly, E. B. . . 
Stewart, Robert . 
Stetson, Kennell 
Storms, A. J. . . 
Shneck, Reuben 
Savage, George W, 
Sexton, John E. . 
Tompkins, I. T. 
Thompson, F. W. 
Tacy, Jacob P. . 
Thompson, John 
Yickers, W. K. 
Winters, James . 
Wittaker, James D. 
Wolfe, George 
Williamson, Robert J 
Woodruff, Edward S. 
Waterman, John W. 
Young, William . . . 



Re-enlisted 23d P. Y. 
Re-enlisted 23d P. V. 



Re-enlisted Co. F, 3d Pa. Cav. 

Re-enlisted Co. A, 23d P. V. 
Re-enlisted Co. H, 23d P. V. 



Re-enlisted 23d P. V. 



Re-enlisted Co. A, 23d P. V. 



Re-enlisted 23d P. V. 



COMPANY 1 

Recruited at Philadelphia. Mustered in April 21, 1861. Mustered out ]ul\ 31, 186] 



Thomas S. Martin 


Captain 






Joseph K. Parker . . 


First Lieut. . . 






Jas. T. Isirkpatrick, Jr. 


Second Lieut . 






I'M ward I. Maguigan. 


First Sergt. . . 


Re-enlisted Capt. 


c, uist p. V. 


William I. Carey . . 


Second Sergl. . 






John P. 1 lougherty 


Third Sergt. 






Benjamin F. Taylor . 


Fourth Sergt. . 






John O'Connor . . . 


Mrst Corp. . . 






Robert Brown . . . 


Si-i mill ( orp. 






Lewis Ludg . . 


Third Corp. . . 






Thomas 15. Neill . . 


Fourth Corp. . 






Samuel Barr .... 


Musician . . . 






Henry Bartel . . . 









PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



25 



Nimi . 



Kl MARKS. 



Berniger, William . 
Bond, Lewis . . . 
Boyd, John .... 
Branigan, Patrick . 
Brazier, William 
Brown, James C. . 
Callan, Henry . . 
Clayton, Franklin • 
Courtney, John B. . 
Crippes, William I. 
Donahey, John . . 
Dick, John M. . . 
Dougherty, William 
Dull, Jacob S. . . 
Emmons. Charles . 
Ennis, Isaac H. . . 
Finney, John D. . . 
Fox, Thomas . . 
Fredericks, Thomas 
Gifford, Alfred H. 
Gilbert, Albert . 
Gould, William . 
Greswold, Edwin 
Gunn, William . 
Hullam, Jesse . . 
Hay, William I. . 
Hesson, Bernard 
Holmes, Edwin . 
Holmes, Rueben 
Hough, Peter D. 
Jobbins, Joseph . 
Johnson, John T. 
Kaesch, Herman 
Kennedy, John . 
Lafierty, James . 
Laurer. William H 
Laux, Henry . . 
Lukins, Cornelius 
Levan, Eldridge . 
McKinley, Henry 
McFarland, Andrew 
McLaughlin, James 
McXeish, John . 
McSherry, James 
Maginley, Joseph E. 
Michael, Joseph 
Michael, Thomas F 
Miller, Wilson 
Meyer, Christopher 
Parker, Joseph D. 
Peterman, Charles 
Peirson, Joseph W 
Pommer, Adolf . 
Reese, Henry . . 
Rittenhouse, Thos. 
Roth, Lewis B. . 
Rotthaupt, Godfrey 
Ryder, John . . 
Sibee, Tobias . . 
Smith, George F. 
Schmitt, Joseph . 
Thomas, John D. 
Williams, John . 
Winters, Enos . 



Private 



Re-enlisted 23d P. Y. 
Re-enlisted Co. A, 23d P. Y. 

Re-enlisted Co. F, 8th Pa. Cav. 
Re-enlisted Co. K, 23d P. V. 

Re-enlisted Co. K, 23d P. Y. 
Re-enlisted Co. K, 23d P. V. 



Re-enlisted Co. A, 23d P. V. 
Re-enlisted Co. C, 58th P. V, 
Re-enlisted Co. K, 23d P. V. 



Re-enlisted Co. H, 23d P. V. 



Re-enlisted Co. H, 23d P. V. 



Re-enlisted Co. H, 23d P. Y. 
Re-enlisted Co. A, 23d P. V. 



2'i 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



COMPANY n 

Recruited at Philadelphia. Mustered inJApril 21, 1861. Mustered out July 31, 1861. 



\ \M) 



Osrar F. Betson 
Augustus H. Wilson 
Edmund Hopper 
Theodore Black 
Benj. A. Coppuck 
Charles W. Norris 
Michael Fulmer . 
Michael Maher . 
Charles W. Bewley 
William Mcllvain 
Thomas Kelly . 
John H. Williams 
William Williams 
Antrim, John . . 
Brown, James . . 
Brelsford, George 
Callahan, Albert 
Chatam, George W 
Cline, Daniel . 
Cook, William 
Clark, John . . 
Carpenter, Charles 
Cassidy, Nicholas 
Donnelly, James 
Donnelly, Daniel 
Felt, John . . . 
Fulton, Abraham 
Gorman, Daniel . 
Graham, Thomas 
Granlers, John H. 
Grevis, Charles . 
Graham, Philip . 
Huber, Charles S. 
Hedinger, John . 
Hendricks, William 
Howard, John . 
Hearst, George . 
II. tines, John . . 
Highland, John . 
Jewell, James R. 
Jordan, Francis M 
Kelly, William . 
Kingsley, James 
Krumshal, John 
I.cmmon, William 
I .ybrund, Montravill 
Lasky, John . . 
Lewis, Leon . . 
McClusky, David 
McArthur, William 
Met/, John . . . 
MrGirr, I'eter . 
Mi Connell, John 
McFetridge, James 
Mc Namara, James 
Moan, John .... 
Mills, John .... 
Mc David, Thomas 
Moore, Robert . . 
Mi Williams, James 



Rank. 

Captain 
First Lieut 
Second Lieut 
First Sergt. 
Second Sergt 
Third Sergt. 
Fourth Sergt 
First Corp. . 
Second Corp 
Third Corp. 
Fourth Corp 
Musician . 

Private . . 



Remarks. 



Re-enlisted Co. G, 23d P. V. 
Re-enlisted Captain. 88th P. V. 

Re-enlisted Co. P, 23d P. V. 



Re-enlisted Co. A, 2-,d P. V. 



Re-enlisted Co. C, 23d P. V. 
Re-enlisted 23d P. V. 
Re-enlisted Co. F, 23d P. V, 



Re-enlisted 23d P. V. 



Re-enlisted Co. A, 23d P. V, 



Re-enlisted 23d P. V, 



Re-enlisted Co. B, 23d P. V, 



Re-enlisted Co. G 23d P. V, 



I'l NNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



27 



N u 




Rank. 


Remarks. 


Maun, 1 nomas . 




Private . . . 






Peters, John H. . 




•• 








Philips, William 




•• 








Robson, Claude H 




" 








Rile) . 1 lenrv . . 




" 








Remanter, John . 




" 








Roberts. Henry 




" 








Rodgers, Samuel 




" 








Riley, Michael 




" 






Re-enlisted 23d 1'. Y. 


Su igley, William 


" 








Smith, Thomas . . . 


■• 








Spencer, George W. 


■■ 








Thomas, Thompson . 


" 








Thorpe, John .... 


" 








Williams, John . . . 


" 






Re-enlisted 23d V. Y . 


Walker, Nicholas . . 


• i 






Weisner, Caleb . . 


it 


■ ■ ■ 





- ^r°%T \ 




a 



iif„ ». 




1. 1 V ll \ SSES s. GRANT, 
Commanding U. S. Arm) from 1864 to Close oi Wai 



:•- 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 29 



Twenty-tHird Pennsylvania Volunteer 

Infantry. 

# # * 

THREE YEARS SERVICE. 

PRESIDENT Lincoln having called for 300,000 men while 
the regiment was in the three months' service, Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel David B. Birney, with the approval of Colonel 
Dare, then suffering from a disability, from which he soon 
afterwards died, received authority from the Secretary of War 
to organize the regiment for the first three years' service. 
With the co-operation of many of the officers and men who 
had served with him in the three months' service, began the 
recruiting of companies, and two days after the muster out of 
the three months' regiment, Captain Thomas H. Neill, United 
States Army, on August 2, 1 861, mustered three companies, and 
by August 14th it was recruited to the maximum number and 
allowed to retain its old number, Twenty-third Pennsylvania, 
with the following officers : Colonel David B. Birney, who 
died in service October, 1864, while Major-General, Command- 
ing Tenth Army Corps ; Lieutenant-Colonel Charles Wilhelm, 
Major George C. Spear, who was killed while in command of 
the Sixty-first Pennsylvania at Marye's Heights, May 3, 1863 ; 
Major John Ely, afterwards promoted Brigadier-General; Adju- 
tant James E. Collins. The Twenty-third remained in camp 
near Falls of Schuylkill a few days when it was ordered to 
Washington. The regiment reported to General Burnside, 
who was in command of troops not brigaded in the vicinity of 
the Capitol. This camp was known as Camp Sprague. On 
September 8th, it moved to Queens Farm, on the Seventh 
Street Road, the camp being known as Camp Graham in 
honor of the brigade commander. During the winter they 
were given Sibley tents to accommodate sixteen men. With 
little instructions, they soon built palisades about four feet 
high upon which they raised the tents ; a stove being placed 
in the centre (the men lying in a circle) made very comfort- 
able quarters. 

While here, by authority of the War Department, it was 
recruited to fifteen companies, twelve of which were from 




MAJ.-GEN'L GEORGE B. McCLELLAN, 
< ommanding Army oi the Potomac, 1S61 to Nov in6j. 



30 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



31 



Philadelphia, one from Pittsburg, one from Wilkesbarre and 
one from Columbia and assigned to the First Brigade, First 
Division, Fourth Corps, composed as follows: Sixty-fifth New 
York, the "Chasseurs," Colonel John Cochrane ; Sixty-seventh 
New York, First Long Island, Colonel Julius \Y. Adams ; 
Twenty-third Pennsylvania, Colonel David B. Birney; Thirty- 
first, afterwards the Eighty-second Pennsylvania, Colonel 
David X. Williams. Brigade Commander, General L. Pike 
Graham; Division Commander, General Don Carlos But 11 ; 
Corps Commander, General Erasmus D. Keyes. 

Its first colors were presented by friends in Philadelphia 
before proceeding to the held in the three months' service. While 
at this cam]) the regiment was 
carefully instructed in drills 
and discipline by Colonel Bir- 
ney, parading to receive the 
State Flag, presented by Hon 
Galusha A. Grow, Speaker of 
the United States House of 
Representatives, on behalf of 
the Governor of Pennsylvania, 
the Honorable Andrew G. 
Curtin, and was responded to 
by the Honorable William D. 
Kelly, of Philadelphia, and by 
Colonel Birney. The occasion 
was made one of festivity and 
ceremony, camp being elabor- 
ately decorated with ever- 
green ; each company having 

an elegant dinner provided. During the day prizes were contend- 
ed for in pole climbing, sackracing, pig chasing, boxing and other 
games of amusement, the entire day being given up to pleasure 
and entertainment, the camp being crowded with visitors from 
Washington and members of the brigade, the Twenty-third 
entertaining all who called. There being present Honorable 
Simon Cameron, Secretary of War; members of Congress 
from Pennsylvania and many distinguished and influential 
citizens, friends of the regiment from Philadelphia. The 
division was drilled in evolutions of the line weekly by 
General Buell, while he remained in command. In these 




ZACHARIAH SHAW. 
Killed at Cold Harbor. Jnne i, [864, 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



exercises the regiment always paraded as two battalions, 
each battalion numbering as many men as any other single 
regiment in the brigade. The division drills were on the 
field at Meridian Hill; this is now one of the finest residential 
sections of Washington; it was then away out in the country. 
On our march over to the drill grounds we passed the U. S. 
Soldiers' Home; the old boys were always out in force to greet 
the youngsters. 

The regiment was dressed in a dark blue Zouave uniform 
and was known as the Birney Zouaves, with 15 companies, band 
of 36 pieces and two vivandieres, who remained with the regi- 
ment until the 
later part of the 
year, when thev 
left for home. 
In addition to 
the regular drills 
the men were 
constantly em- 
ployed in build- 
ing fortifications 
cutting timber, 
and assisting in 
building Forts 
Lincoln, Stevens 
Slemmer a n d 
Cedar Hill. 
While in cam]), 
WINTER QUARTERS. typhoid fever 

broke out, resulting in the death of one officer and fifty-two 
men. The camp was subsequently removed to high and airy 
ground in the vicinity of Bladensburg, the disease disappearing. 
This old town was noted for its duelling grounds, several 
noted duels having been fought there. During the winter of 
1 86 1 the boys built a theatre and every night a vaudeville 
show was given, two companies being [admitted at a time. 
The talent was furnished by the men of the regiment and the 
performers, tragedians, comedians, song and dance, as well 
as players on various instruments and singers were first-class 
and very much enjoyed. 




PENNSYLVANIA V< (LUNTEER INFANTRY. 



33 



Company B, which had been organized from the students 
of Captain Hildebrand's Gvmnasium, Ninth and Arch streets, 
brought with tliem a complete school outfit and kept the 
exercises going while in Camp Graham and Birney. 

While at this camp, the regiment, by request of Hon. 
Simon Cameron, then Secretary of War, marched to Wash- 




MAJ.-GEN'L AMBROSE E. BURNSIDE, 

Commanding Army of the Potomac, Nov. 1S62 to Jan. 1863. 

ington and paraded in review down Pennsylvania Avenue, 
15 companies, 1427 strong, with band of 36 pieces and drum 
corps of 30 pieces, with Drum Major Landenburg and the two 
vivandiers. making quite a display, being heartily applauded 
along the route, the average age of the men of the regiment 
being at that time nineteen years. For their splendid appear- 
ance, good behavior and discipline every one was given a 



34 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



pass the next day ; so the camp was deserted with the excep- 
tion of the guard. This camp was named Camp Birney in 
honor of its colonel. 

The Zouave uniform that the regiment went away in, 
after six months, began to wear out and, as no more suits 
could be procured of this kind it was finally decided to get 
any uniform that was on hand in the Quartermaster General's 
department. So, when distributed, it consisted of what was 
called dark blue dress coat and pants, but were of different 
shades of color, with brass epaulettes and dog collar, or a 
leather stock. My, what a contrast from the natty Zouave suit 

to this one of misfits ! After 
the first dress parade the 
regiment was dismissed with 
orders to have the clothes 
tailored. This operation was 
nearly as bad, as the peaks 
of the caps were almost cut 
away, while, in many cases 
the dog collars were cut 
down to a shoestring. No 
wonder the Colonel was dis- 
gusted, and after a few weeks 
we drew another uniform — 
this time the regulation dark 
blue blouse and light blue 
pants, ever afterwards worn 
by the armv. The following is a version of one of Jimmy 
Smith's songs : 

" That Suit of Blue." 

' ' They gave us a coat that looked like a sack, 

It would go twice around you, and button on the back ; 

Also a blouse you could nearly see through, 

And a cap that nearly covered the whole suit of blue." 

On February 17, 1862, Colonel Birney was promoted to 
Brigadier General and assigned to duty with the Third Corps, 
and Captain Thomas H. Will, of the Fifth United Slates 
Infantry, who had mustered the regiment into the service, was 
made its Colonel. He assumed command on the 20th and, as 
per orders oi the War Department, the maximum of infantry 




si H. l-i 1REBAUGH, 
Co. A. Killed at Fair Oaks, May 31, 1862. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



35 



regiments being iooo men, five companies of the regiment 
were detached. Four of these, Company L, Captain Butler 
Dilley; Company O, Captain Robert L. Orr ; Company P, 
Captain form \V. Crosby, and Company R, Captain George W. 
Mindil, with Major Spear as Lieutenant-Colonel, were trans- 
ferred to the Sixty-first Pennsylvania. Company M being 
disbanded, its officers 
and men were distrib- 
uted among the remain- 
ing ten companies. This 
order, not then under- 
stood by the men, was 
obeyed with much re 
luctance, and under pro- 
test. The men of these 
companies were for quite 
awhile hard to reconcile, 
but, after becoming ac- 
quainted, were united 
with the other six com- 
panies of the Sixty first in 
making the brilliant rec- 
ord of this fighting regi 
ment of the Sixth Corps. 
While at these camps 
it was engaged in picket 
duty, and on the day of 
the battle of Ball's Bluff was under arms preparatory to sup- 
porting the attacking column, but were not called upon, the 
movement having been abandoned. 

When the Army of the Potomac, on March 10th, moved to 
attack the enemy at Manassas, the regiment moved with the 
column intending to strike the enemy's flank. The route of 
march, after crossing Chain Bridge, was along the river road. 
As this was our first march of any considerable distance we 
began to find that our knapsacks were heavy. The first signs of 
unloading were the black overcoats of the Sixty-first scattered 
over the road. Soon everybody was throwing away all the 
extras and by the time we reached Prospect Hill we were in 
light marching order, and kept in that condition until the 
end of the service. After a skirmish near Lewinsville the 
enemy retreated and the regiment returned to its old camp. 




MAJ.-GEN'L JOSEPH HOOKER, 

Commanding Army of the Potomac 

From Jan. to June, 1S64. 



3C 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



While on this expedition we visited the camp of the 
Pennsylvania Reserve Division at Langley. It was a model 
one, built of comfortable log houses in backwoods style ; the 
boys being away in the direction of Manassas. 

On March 26th we marched to Alexandria, where we em- 
barked on the steamer "Vanderbilt" for Fortress Monroe. 
Disembarking here, we found one of the largest permanent 
forts of the Government, protecting the approaches by water to 
Washington. Since the war there has been established in the 
vicinity a Soldiers' Home and Schools for Indians and Freed- 
men, both under the auspices of the United States Govern- 
ment. The regiment moved with the advance on the Peninsula, 
passing through the village of Hampton, which the rebels had 
burned, skirting the old colonial settlement of Jamestown, 
where the first settlers of Virginia established a colony. It was 
here that by tradition Pocahontas saved the life of Captain 
John Smith. All through this section/leading up to Richmond, 

the once powerful tribe of 
Chickahominy Indians, under 
chief Powhatan, held posses- 
sion. Skirmishing with the 
rebels at Young's Mills and 
Warwick Court House, los- 
ing several wounded, the 
enemy falling back to their 
entrenchments. 

Having possession of the 
enemy's camp at this place, 
the boys regaled themselves 
with making slap-jacks (in 
the iron pans they left 
behind. Here the regiment 
was engaged in picket and 
fatigue duty ; the picket line 
along the Warwick Creek being constantly engaged. Loss, 
nine men wounded. 

While here, several of the men were wounded by a rebel 
sharpshooter; he was eventually shot by the Chaplain of the 
Kighty-second Pennsylvania, who came out to the lines. 
For this breach of discipline he was reprimanded by General 
McClellan and sent home to report to Bishop Stevens, at 




[AMES G will I VMSl IN, Lieut. Co. k 
Killed at Cold Harbor, June i, 1864. 



PENNSYLVANIA Y< ILUNTEER INFANTRY. 



Philadelphia. This was virtually a leave of absence, as Presi 
dent Lincoln detailed him to Lawrence, Kansas, where he 
arrived in time to officiate at the burial ceremonies of the 




MAJ.-GEN'L GEORGE G. MEADE, 
Commanding Army of the Potomac, 1863 to 1865. 

victims of that massacre. On entering Williamsburg, we 
found the sharpshooter in the insane asvlum, having been shot 
in the head. The poor fellow was now insane. 

Orders were strict as to firing on picket, as McClellan did 




L I 



•■■ 



" 






p^f^fe^'' 4 









% 



V 



38 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, 



39 




not want to bring on an engagement until prepared to attack, 
but as the rebels would open on the regiment as soon as they 
got on the picket line the men could not be kept from exchang- 
ing shots, so that it was a picket fight every time. When not 
on picket they were engaged in working on entrenchments and 
building corduroy roads. 
This position along War- 
wick Creek was part of the 
lines facing Yorktown. Nearly 
the whole time they laid here 
rations were very — very 
scarce, the men going to ex- 
tremes to appease hunger. 
This shortage of rations no 
doubt was on account of the 
swampv condition of the 
country, retarding the supply 
wagons from getting to the 
front. 

Upon the general advance 
on the enemy's line, at York- 
town, May 4th, the regiment 
was selected to storm one of 
the main forts, near Lee's Mills, but after floundering around 
in the mud, it was ascertained the enemy had evacuated his 
works. All the night of the 3d the enemy's batteries were 
shelling our lines and when we reached their works and found 
them gone it meant a stern chase. To retard pursuit they 
had buried torpedoes in the abatis fronting their works and 
along the sides of the road where the officers and men 
marched ; while a number of men of other regiments were 
wounded by these missiles, fortunately none of the Twenty- 
third were injured. There was quite a rivalry to have the 
first flag on the rebel works. Left General Guide Ed. Wilson 
(afterwards lieutenant) who was a swift runner, took the 
colors and reached the works first, amid the hurrahs of the 
boys. 

The division bivouacking at Chesseman's plantation and the 
next day made a forced march arriving on the battle field of 
Williamsburg late in the afternoon of May 5th. While the regi- 
ment did not become engaged, under a heavy artillery fire lost 



WILLIAM LINTON, 
Killed at Fair Oaks, May 31, 1862 




Ill 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



II 



several men wounded. The next morning about daylight the 
regiment was part of the skirmish line, its position being im- 
mediately in front of Fort Magruder. The two left companies 
under Captain Maxwell being near the fort were the first to 
enter, the enemy having left and were running across the field 
in the direction of the town, quite a number of their wounded 
being left behind in their works. 

General Keyes, the corps commander, in his official report 
states: ''Two companies of the Twenty-third Pennsylvania, 
Colonel Neill, were the first to take possession of Fort 
Magruder, as that regiment had been the first to plant the 
Stars and Stripes on the works at Lee's Mills." 

Skirmishing with his rear guard through the town, where 
it stacked arms south of Mary and Williams College, every in- 
dication showed a hasty retreat with his abandoned dead and 
wounded, wagons and caissons stuck in the mud, and occas- 
ional pieces of artillery. This town is one of the oldest 
settlements in Virginia ; here was held the seat of the govern- 
ment during the colonial days. In the House of Burgess, at 
that period holding session in the old town, Patrick Henry, the 
orator, of Virginia, in his 
famous speech, declared, 
" Give me liberty, or give me 
death!" It was from Will- 
iamsburg that Washington 
started on his expedition into 
the wilderness to protect the 
frontier settlements from 
depredations by the Indians 
and French. We found all 
the people had gone to 
Richmond, with the exception 
of the women and old men. 
Safety guards were placed 
all over the town and the 
people, from that time until 
the close of the war, were 
supplied with rations by our Government. Like all towns in 
the Confederacy, the hatred for the Yankee was quite intense. 

One of the oldest educational establishments, Williams 
and Mary College, founded in colonial days, is here located; 




LIEUT. JAMES 1' >HNSTI IN, 
Co. E. Killed at Cold Harbor, June i, 1864. 



42 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REOIMENT 




we found it used as a depot of supplies by the Confederates. A 
mill just outside the town was put to use grinding flour, and 
with the Johnnies' iron pans, found in their camps, had a good 
time, while here, in making slap-jacks. That night we skir- 
mished with the enemy, go- 
ing on picket, picking up 
several pieces of artillery, 
with spokes cut, which were 
abandoned by the enemy be- 
ing stuck in the mud, the 
roads were so cut up, it was 
about as much as the men 
could pull through, much 
less wagons or artillery. 

On the ioth we advanced 
and had a skirmish with the 
enemy, losing several men. 
While at Ropers Church on 
Sunday following the battle 

JOHN G. BOYD, ........ . . 

Lieut. Co. D. Killed Cold Harbor, June i, 1864. 01 \\ llliamsblirg.the regiment 

gave an exhibition drill before Sykes' Division of Regulars. 
" Bucky," our Colonel Thomas H. Neill, who was a West 
Pointer, wanted to show his friends in the regular establish- 
ment what could be done by volunteers. Word was passed 
around and soon the boys were polishing up their buttons, 
blackening their shoes with pieces of pork rind, trimming up 
their hair, as they wanted to look spruce ; and to please 
" Bucky " our colonel, every man made himself as present- 
able as possible. From the applause the regiment received, it 
was evident their efforts were appreciated, and the way the 
old man smiled as he passed around the boys in bivouac, 
proved he was delighted. 

While advancing through this section of the peninsula, 
the boys, learning that a detail of a New York regiment was 
on guard over some sheep, at night, formed a squad and 
relieved the guard, so the regiment had lamb, sheep and 
mutton for breakfast next morning. ( )f course, when it was 
discovered that the trick had been played, inspection was 
ordered, but as usual nothing found. Proceeding through 
New Kent Court House, Baltimore Cross Roads to Bottom 
Bridge, skirmishing along the way, losing several men, the 



PENNSYLVANIA V< il.l'NTF.KK INFANTRY. 



■»:; 



regiment encamped on the farm of the Rebel General Garnett. 

On the 23d of May, a Rebel officer was brought into 
the lines blindfolded. What his mission was we did not 
learn ; but shortly afterward the Twenty-third Pennsylvania, 
Seventh Massachusetts, and Eighth Pennsylvania Cavalry 
crossed the Chickahominy at Bottom Bridge on a reconnois- 
sance ; the enemy was driven from his position, the ground 
being held about four miles in the direction of Richmond. 
Next day heavy skirmishing was continued until night to the 
left of the Williamsburg Road. The object being obtained, the 
command moved to the right at Seven Pines, where it threw 
up breastworks, details being engaged in cutting down the 
woods. 

On the 28th of May, it moved with the brigade, now 
under command of General Abercrombie, and went into posi- 
tion along the Nine Mile Road from the Williamsburg Road 
to and across the York River Railroad. 

About noon of May 31st, while the men were engaged in 
cooking rice, the only ration on hand — the wagons being 
way behind, fresh meat being about to be issued — the enemy 
attacked Casey's Division, which was in position about a 
quarter mile beyond the Nine Mile Road, and the battle of 
Fair Oaks was opened. As soon as 
the action began, a shell from the 
enemy landed in a clearing in front 
of the camp, and the men at once got 
into line. General Keyes came riding 
up the Nine Mile Road, passing the 
Twenty-third's camp. Seeing the 
men in line, he ordered it to the sup- 
port of Casey's right. Moving across 
the Nine Mile Road and through 
some low bushes they came upon the 
enemy who were driving in Nagley's 
brigade of Casey's division. With 
cheers the Twentv-third charged, maj-gen'l Erasmus d. keyes, 

Commanding Fourth Corps. 

striking them in the flank, driving Army of the Potomac 

them through a clearing and woods, where they continued the 
fighting until recalled, passing back over our dead and wounded 
forming a new line on a wagon road, running through the 
woods. Here, while being moved to the rear in the direction 




44 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 




of the Nine Mile Road to connect with the brigade, it was met 
by Generals Couch and Abercrombie. The enemy being very 
close, Couch, in order to deceive them, began giving in loud 
tones orders as though manoeuvring a division, and leaving 

the Twenty-third, he, with 
the Sixty-first and Eighty- 
second Pennsylvania, Sixty- 
fifth New York and Seventh 
Massachusetts, formed a new 
line to the right and rear of 
Fair Oaks Station. The regi- 
ment, again advancing 
through the woods, drove the 
enemy into the clear fields, 
where could be seen large 
masses moving in the direc- 
tion to cross the railroad. Fire 
being opened upon them, 
here the regiment became 
so hotly engaged that it 
was driven back slowly to the 
Nine Mile Road. Lying down, facing and firing on the 
front and both Hanks, the enemy could be seen passing 
down the railroad across the Nine Mile Road and to the 
left crossing the road. They maintained this position with 
no support on either flanks under a most severe fire. Fortu- 
nately it was high, the balls going through the limbs of the 
trees ; they had held the enemy in check in this neck of woods 
for two hours. Finally Colonel Neill, finding the regiment was 
attacked on the front, right and left flanks, with no support, 
ordered the men to retire through an abatis or fallen timber 
to their old camp on the Nine Mile Road. 

It appears now that Couch, in order to gain time, so that 
he could form the balance of our brigade, Sixty-first and 
Thirty-first (afterwards known as the Eighty-second) Penn- 
sylvania and Sixty-fifth New York, the " Chasseurs," to the 
rear and right of Fair Oaks Station at the Adams farm house, 
left the Twenty-third in this angle in the woods to hold the 
enemy in check. This they did until ordered to retire. The 
regiment at this period was isolated from its brigade, division 
and corps commanders — in fact, was fighting on its own 



HEXkV A MARCHAN I . 
Cant. Co. I. Killed at Cold Harbor, June i, 1864 



PENNSYLVANIA YOLl'NTEER INFANTRY. 



4.") 



hook. Reaching the camp, they faced to the rear to 
receive the attack of the enemv who had passed around the 
abatis. While thus engaged a regiment moving up the Nine 
Mile Road broke and coming back on the Twenty-third threw 
the line into confusion, but the men quickly rallied, holding 
the position for a half hour until ordered out. The resistance 
of the regiment in its old camp, in conjunction with the First 
Long Island, Sixty-seventh New York on its left, was evi- 
denced in the number of the enemy's killed that was strewn 
over that portion of the field. A new line having been formed 
to its rear, the regiment was brought back and placed in the 
middle of the line ; here it remained until ordered back to the 
Williamsburg Road. At this time none of our troops were to 
the right of the Williamsburg Road or beyond the Nine Mile 
Road. 

Opening fire on the enemy to the right of the Nine Mile 
Road, caused him considerable trouble. At this juncture, part 
of Heintzelman's Division arrived, and, again crossing the 
Nine Mile Road, facing in the direction of the railroad, 
drove the enemy's advance 
back to his main line. As we 
halted in the woods, Colonel 
Neill came riding along the 
line on a new mount, his 
horse having been killed, fol- 
lowed by a colt belonging 
to the mare he was riding. 
As he neared the colors, 
Lieutenant Marchant, in com- 
mand of the color company, 
which numbered about seven 
men at this moment, called 
his attention to the color ser- 
geant and guard — all being 
killed or wounded. The col- 
onel inquired who are the men 
guarding the colors, and the lieutenant, saluting, replied 
"My company." "All right, they have taken good care of 
the colors so far ; we will trust them in their custody for the 
balance of the day." 




THi i\l \f 
Lieut. Co. G. 



] ARMSTRONG, 
Died January 2, 1864. 



4fi 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 




MAJ.-GEN'L \V. B. FRANKLIN, 

Commanding Sixth Corps. 



While here the regiment was relieved bv troops from 
Heintzelman's Division and went into bivouac at the breast- 
works. It was dark when the command reached its final 
position. As the regiment, with its colors, came into the 

i works they were greeted by the boys 
who had become lost in the charges 
hi the woods, and many a hearty 
handshake was had, as they believed 
the regiment had been captured. 
The regiment lost no prisoners.except 
those badly wounded, who were 
unable to leave the field ; thirty-five 
of the enemy were captured. We 
find from official reports that Couch's, 
Casey's, Hooker's and Heintzelman's 
Divisions were contending with the 
whole Confederate Army — Long- 
street's, Hugar and Smith's Corps, 
under the command of General 
Joseph Johnson, who being wounded just before dark, was 
succeeded by General Gustavus Smith, who, about noon of 
June i, was succeeded by General Robert E. Lee, who ever 
after held command of the Army of Northern Virginia. 

The rain of the night before the action had washed away 
the bridges crossing the Chickahominy, and these divisions 
being isolated from the rest of the Army of the Potomac, the 
Richmond authorities deemed it a good time to effect their 
capture. By four o'clock, however, the bridges were repaired 
and reinforcements began to arrive with the advance of Sedg- 
wick's and Richardson's Divisions of Sumner's Corps, and 
when night closed the lines were secure. The next day the 
battle was resumed, and before the action ended the Con- 
federates were driven back to their works at Richmond, leav- 
ing their dead and wounded in our lines. 

Seven officers of the regiment were wounded, viz : 
Major John Ely, Adjutant Thos. K. Hoggs, Captains Edwin 
Palmer, Win. J. Wallace, John F. Glenn and Lieutenants 
George Wood and Win. J. MeFalls, and one hundred and 
seventy men killed and wounded. 

Company C did not participate with the regiment in the 
action, they being on picket on the right. When the enemy 



PENNSY1 VANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



47 



attacked, they were driven in, passing down by way of 
the Nine Mile Road and the railroad, joining Birney's Brigade 
of Kearney's Division. The company was complimented 
bv General Birney for its efficient service. Company 
B was left in camp as camp guard when the regiment 
moved for the front. As the action proceeded it went in to 
the support of Miller's Battery, gathering up arms from the 
wounded and stragglers. Captain Hildebrand placed his men 
in the trenches in front of the battery and when the enemy 
drove in Casey's line and pressed on to take Miller's guns, the 
latter opened on them with canister, and aided by the fire 
of Company B — each man having at least six guns loaded, 
when the rebels charged — they were driven back. Company 
B remained with the battery until it was retired, when it joined 
the regiment as it was falling back from its old camp. 

Colonel Xeill, in his official report, says : "A portion of 
the regiment under command of Captain Glenn, Twenty- 
third Pennsylvania, having become accidentally separated 
in the dense woods in which we were operating, was 
called upon by an aide of 
General Heintzelman to sup- 
port a battery. Captain 
Glenn rallied one hundred 
men around him and volun- 
teered this service. The duty 
was well performed until they 
were relieved." 

The troops the regiment 
engaged beyond the Nine 
Mile Road and in its camp 
was the Twenty-seventh 
Georgia, Sixth South Caro- 
lina, Twenty-eighth Georgia 
and Palmetto Sharp-shooters 
(Jenkins), under the command 

VJ " . THOMAS HABBERMAKER, 

Of Colonel Micah Jenkins, Company B. Killed, Winchester, Sept. 19, 1864. 

who was afterwards killed in the Wilderness, while serving as 
brigadier-general under Longstreet. 

The next morning the regiment, with General Palmer's 
command and squadron of cavalry, was ordered through 
White Oak Swamp. Here it intercepted troops coming in on 




4S 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



the roads leading from Richmond, preventing a flank attack 
and losing several men wounded. While on this duty it was 
the extreme left of the army in the battle of June ist, when 
the enemy were driven off the field. That night the Con- 




MAJ.-GEN'L JOHN SE I m,\\ [CK, 
Commanding Sixth Corps. Killed at Spottsylvania, May 9, 1864. 

federates fell back to Richmond, and the regiment returned to 
the position in the line behind the works on the Williamsburg 
Road. On returning to the old cam]) it was found devastated 
and all the equipage lost. 

LOSSES AT FAIR OAKS. 
Killed, wounded and missing as per General McClellan's report : 
/ T nion — Sumner, i 223 

Heintzelman, [394 

Keyes, 3126— Total, 5737. 

Killed, wounded and missing as per General J. E. John- 
son's report. 

Confederah Longstreet and Smith, 4283 

D. II. Hill, 2500— Total, 6783. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



49 




The following is an extract from Report of General 
Keyes, the corps commander: * " "At a little past two 
o'clock I ordered Will's Twenty-third and Rippey's Sixty- 
first Pennsylvania Regiments to move to the support of 
Casev's right. Neill attacked the enemy twice with great 
gallantry. In the first attack 
the enemv were driven back ; 
in the second attack, and 
under the immediate com- 
mand of General Couch, 
these two regiments assailed 
a vastly superior force of the 
enemy and fought with ex- 
traordinary bravery, though 
compelled at last to retire, 
.they brought in thirty-five 
prisoners. Both regiments 
were badly cut up. After 
this attack the Twenty third 
took part in the hard fight- 
ing which closed the day near 
Seven Pines. 

* " Some of the Tenth Massachusetts, now under 
the command of Captain Miller ; the Ninety-third Pennsyl- 
vania, under Colonel McCarter, of Peck's Brigade ; the 
Twenty-third Pennsylvania, under Colonel Neill, of Aber- 
crombie's Brigade ; a portion of the Thirty-sixth New York, 
Colonel Innes ; a portion of the Fifty-fifth New York, and 
the First Long Island, Colonel Adams, together with frag- 
ments of other regiments of Couch's Division, still contended 
on the right of this line, while a number of troops that I tlid 
not recognize occupied the space between me and them. 

" As the ground was miry and encumbered with fallen 
trees, I dismounted and mingled with the troops. The first I 
questioned belonged to Kearney's Division, Berry's Brigade, 
Heintzelman's Corps ; the next to the Fifty-sixth New York, 
now under command of its lieutenant-colonel, and the third 
belonged to the One Hundred and Tenth Pennsylvania, of 
Casey's Division. 

" I took out my glass to examine a steady, compact line 
of troops about sixty-fivejyards in advance, the extent of 



CAPT. JAMES M. CRAIG, 
Co. H. 

Died of Wounds Received at Cold Harbor. 



50 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



which toward our right I could not discover. The line in front 
was so quiet that I thought they might possibly be our own 
troops. 

" The vapors from the swamp, the leaves, and the fading 
light (for it was then 6 o'clock) rendered it uncertain who they 
were, so I directed the men to get their aim, but to reserve 
their fire until I could go up to the left and examine — at the 
same time that they must hold that line or the battle would be 

lost. They replied with 
a firm determination to 
stand their ground. 

" I had just time to 
put up my glass and 
move ten paces toward 
the left of the line, where 
my horse stood, but while 
I was in the act of mount- 
ing as fierce a fire of 
musketry was opened as 
any I had heard during 
the day. The fire from 
our side was so deadly 
that the heavy masses of 
the enemy coming in on 
the right, which before 
had been held back for 
nearly two hours (that 
being about the time con- 
sumed in passing over 
less than a thousand 
maj.-gen-l horatio g.wright, yards) by about a third 

Commanding Sixth Corps r r-» l ' r\* ' * 

From May, 1864, to close of war part ot LoUCll S 1 >1V1S1< >11, 

were n< >w arrested. The last line, formed of portions of Couch's 
and Casey's Divisions and a portion of Kearney's Division, 
checked the advance of the enemy and finally repulsed him. 
And this was the beginning of the victory which, on the follow- 
ing day, was so gloriously completed." 

General Abercrombie, in command of the brigade, in his 
reportsays: * * * " Shortly afterwards the Sixty-first was 
placed in position near the Twenty-third, then already 
engaged." * * * " The dead of the enemy on the portion 




■■"f -■_-> — ~->— 



-ttirtu*. 







Mb! 



51 



52 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 




of the battlefield occupied by the First Long Island and 
Twenty-third and Sixty-first Pennsylvania are proofs I have of 
the gallantry displayed by these regiments. 

Picket lines were established and the regiment went into 
camp to the right of the railroad, its position being on the 

left of the Philadelphia Brig- 
ade of Sumner's Corps. While 
here, on June 7th, it was sent 
to the support of the picket 
lines in front of a brigade of 
the Second Corps. Passing 
through their camps and 
crossing the breastworks, the 
regiment bivouacked for the 
night in the woods, with in- 
structions to sleep on their 
arms. At dawn it moved to 
the edge of a clearing, and 
soon the Rebs charged with a 
yell, driving in the pickets. 
Colonel Neill would not, how- 
ever, allow the latter to pass 
through our lines, compelling them to lie down in front as the 
Johnnies made their appearance on the opposite end of the 
field. As the Rebs attempted to advance no further, the colonel 
ordered Captain John F. Glenn to take Companies A and B 
and re-occupy the picket posts, which command was promptly 
executed. When the detail returned, the regiment was ordered 
back to camp, and on the way out we saw that the whole army 
was in line of battle. The severe picket fight of the early 
morning was no doubt explained as a general advance of the 
enemy, but if so intended it was recalled. 

The regiment remained on the battlefield until the 10th, 
when it was relieved by fresh troops and ordered to a new 
camp on the left of the line, beyond Seven Pines, being con- 
stantly engaged in picket fighting. At the commencement of 
the Seven Days' Fight one wing of the Twenty-third, com- 
posed of Companies A, C, H, 1 and K, under command of 
Colonel Neill, was posted on the eastern edge of White Oak 
Swamp, to prevent the enemy from turning the left Hank of 
the army then on a retrograde movement to the James River 



JACOB HARP, Cos. F. and K. 
Killed at Cold Harbor, June I, 1864. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



53 



during which it lost several wounded. That night the left wing 
of the regiment, commanded by Captain John F. Glenn, held 
the picket line in White < )ak Swamp, while the army passed to 
the rear. This was a most important picket. All night long 
the Army of the Potomac was passing to the rear for the 
purpose of assuming a new position, while the Army of 
Northern Virginia was massing in front for the next day's 
engagement. 

The roar and rumble of both armies could be distinctly 
heard, so close were the picket lines of the contending armies 
that the commands given by one side were easily distinguish- 
able by the other. The anxiety was so great that Colonel 
Glenn, the Field Officer of the day, with the "grand rounds" 
came along about every fifteen minutes. That night the 
countersign was " Austerlitz " and it kept the boys guessing 
what was the word ; the nearest we could get to it was 
" ovster snitz." This wing participated in the opening of the 
Battle of Charles City Cross-Roads, losing several men, and 
after marching all night through 
the dismal shades of the swamps, 
it arrived at Haxall's Plantation, 
on the James, where the two wings 
of the regiment were united. As 
we marched up the road in the 
direction of Malvern Hill, General 
McClellan and staff passed us, 
being received with the greatest 
enthusiasm. Moving to the top 
of the hill, we participated in the 
action of Turkey Bend, having 
several men wounded. This 
action was fought principally by 
the batteries, Holmes' Division 
having been sent out from Rich- 
mond to secure Malvern Hill. 
( )ur division — Couch's — having 
arrived first with the artillery, 
made the position secure, and, with good battery practice, 
soon drove Holmes off. This was the extreme left of our line 
during the action at Charles City Cross-Roads. On the top 
of the hill, overlooking the valley of the James, was an old 




MAJ.-GEN'L DON CARLOS BUELL, 
Commanded the Division in 1S61. 




.'. I 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



o5 




colonial mansion called the Malvern House, which was used 
as a signal station to communicate with the gunboats in 
the James River. 

The next day was the last day of the Seven Days' 
Fight, known as Malvern Hill, which is notable as one of 
the best stand-up fights be- 
tween the Army of the Poto- 
mac and Army of Northern 
Virginia. Xo breastworks or 
trees abounded to afford pro- 
tection, therefore it was an 
open field action, because up 
to that time neither army had 
realized the importance of 
hastilv constructed entrench- 
ments. 

Shortly after daylight the 
regiment swung into line of 
battle, lying down facing a 
woods. Shortly afterwards it 
was moved into a road, hug- 
ging its right bank, as while 
in this position it was exposed to a heavy artillery fire from the 
left flank. About 2 P. M. it was detached and sent to General 
Howe — who was hotly engaged on the right — and ordered to 
the support of a battery. While passing through a field of 
grain the enemy opened on us with spherical case-shot and 
as the regiment emerged into the clearing, it was found 
that the battery — " Snow's" Maryland — was hotly engaged 
with a rebel battery across a ravine, and that sharpshooters con- 
cealed in the latter were picking off the battery boys. Captain 
Glenn was detailed, with his company, to drive the sharp- 
shooters out, and after quite a spirited fight forced them to 
abandon the ravine. Then began one of the shortest and 
sharpest batterv practices possible, resulting in the rebel guns 
being disabled and destroyed. During the time that this was 
transpiring the regiment was hugging the ground in the rear 
of the guns, while an enfilading fire from batteries on the left 
was sweeping the ground a few feet in their rear, throwing 
the sand all over them. 

About this time a grand charge was made by the rebel 



JOHN McGINNIS, 
Co. E. Killed at Cold Harbor, June j. [864. 



56 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



lines upon Morrell's and Couch's Divisions, which held the 
front. The volume of yells as they came on was soon drowned 
by cheers from the Union side, and the onslaught was repulsed. 
The first charge took place while the regiment was in support 
of the battery, whose position was in the bend of the line at 
its turn to the right. When the rebel battery was silenced the 
regiment was moved to the left, reporting to its brigade com- 
mander, General Abercrombie, and, swinging into line of 









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i2& : 





SHALER'S BRIG U 'I 
al Marye's Heights, May 3, 1863. 

battle, relieved two of the regiments of the brigade in Couch's 
line. The left of the regiment was here in a most trying 
position, as the batteries immediately in the rear were firing 
over the heads of the men. Several were killed and wounded 
by the premature explosion of our own shells, but the position 
was a vital one and necessary to maintain. Colonel Neill, 
riding up to the artillery, demanded that the guns be more ele- 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 57 



vated so as to clear the line. Soon was discerned, a quarter of a 
mile across the clear fields, three lines of battle emerging from 
the woods in division front. They swept on — the batteries, 
meanwhile, making great gaps in their lines — until well within 
range, when our lines opened on them. The Twenty-third 
held its fire until the enemy were close up, when we poured 
in a point-blank vollev, rapidly loading, and firing with fearful 
effect. The men did not take time enough to return the 





* '"' ^ 




m ^<4 






»4! 






\w- \k ■ 



MAJ.-GE.N'L DARIUS N. COUCH, 
Commanding 3rd Division, Sixth Corps. 

rammers, but stuck them in the ground, continuing until the 
enemy was finally forced to retire. As the smoke lifted off the 
field, the Rebs were again observed to be advancing at a charge, 
and, when within one hundred yards of our line, with yells they 
came on at a double-quick. It was a most critical moment, 
but our men held firm, pouring into the enemy a constant 
fire, finally compelling them to again beat a retreat. It was 



58 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



now quite dark, and our ammunition was exhausted, sixty 
rounds having been used in the action. When the engage- 
ment closed the regiment stacked arms on the field, Colonel 
Neill informing the men that we must depend upon the 
bayonet until relieved or until he could get ammunition. It 
was our luck to bivouac in front of some wheat stacks, and 
soon we were sleeping as unconcerned as if ensconced in a 
feather bed. 

It appears that at the opening of the fight General Lee, 
feeling unwell, called General Longstreet to temporary ser- 
vice near him, while he rode to the left with Jackson's column 




MALVERN llll. I HOI SE. 

i in i stands on the a pox of the hill overlooking the valley of the James River, I luring 

the battle it was used as a Signal Station. 

to view the troops on that front. Longstreet was ordered to 
make a reconnoissance with the divisions of Huger and 
Magruder to the right, and to report the feasibility of an 
aggressive battle. An elevated plateau was. found on theii 
right front, as high as that on the Union side, from which a view 
was possible along the Union front and of the open ground 
as far as Jackson's field. From the crest of this ridge, the 
ground dropped oil sharply some eighteen inches or two feet toa 
lower terrace, forming a natural parapetand terre-plein capable 
<il accommodating sixty guns massed. Longstreet reported 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



59 




to Lee that Porter's batteries, under the cross-fire of the Con- 
federates thus posted on his left and front, could be thrown 
into disorder and in this manner make way for combined 
assaults of the infantry. Lee ordered a disposition of his 
forces accordingly, sending the 
pioneer corps to cut a road For 
the batteries in this position on 
their right. 

The most convenient point 
for observing the effect of the 
artillery fire was occupied by 
General Armistead's brigade, 
obliquely and in front of Mor- 
rell's division. Porter, whose 
batteries had been engaged 
with Jackson on the left of the 
Confederate position, as soon 
as he discovered their artillery 
going into position to his left 
and front, concentrated his fire 
in that direction, and as fast as 
they came into position, piled 
them into a mass, rendering them hors du combat. 
this time concluded to make an effort to turn the Union right, 
and, with Longstreet, rode in that direction in search of a 
route, at the same time ordering the reserves to make the 
move. As they started on the march the troops on their 
right advanced and were soon engaged. The march was 
arrested, and soon the assault along the line from left to right 
began. The Confederates attacked in splendid style, making 
repeated brave charges. Finally, however, they were repulsed 
along the entire line. 

The writer afterwards had a conversation about the battle 
with a Confederate sergeant who was wounded and captured 
in one of the later battles, and in speaking of this engagement 
he said that after the last charge he was unable to find any 
member of his company until 9 o'clock the next morning, 
that the roads and woods were filled with their demoralized 
troops en route to Richmond, and it was not until 11 A. M. 
the next day that as one of the skirmishers advanced to our 
position to agreeably find our army gone. 



MAJ.-GEN'L JOHN NEWTON, 
Commanding 3rd Division. Sixth Corj.--. 

Lee about 



60 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



The troops that fought this battle were Morrell's, Couch's, 
Sykes", Hooker's and Kearney's Divisions of the Union Army 
against Magruder's, Hugar's, D. H. Hill's, Whiting's, Ewell's 
and A. P. Hill's Divisions of the Confederate forces, the 
brunt of the attacks falling upon Morrell's Division of Porter's 
Corps and Couch's Division of Keyes' Corps. The Confederate 
loss was 5000 ; Union loss was 2000 killed and wounded. 



REPORT OF BRIG. GEN. JOHN J. ABERCROMBIE, U. S., 

Commanding Second Brigade at the Battle of Malvern Hill. 

Headquarters Abercrombie's Brigade. 

Camp near Harrison's Landing, Va. , July 12, 1862. 

Captain : — I have the honor to submit the following report of the 
part taken by my brigade in the action of 1st July, 1862: 

On the 30th of June, my brigade crossed Turkey Creek Bridge 
and proceeded on the road to Richmond about two miles, and deployed 
into line of battle to the right of the road in an elevated field, where it 
remained for a few hours; but finding my position much exposed to the 
enemy's shells at long range, another and a less exposed position was 

taken. No advances being made 
by the rebels, the brigade bivou- 
acked for the night. 

Early on the morning of the 
1st instant, orders from division 
headquarters were received to 
cross a ravine immediately in 
front of my line, to support a por- 
tion 1 if Howe's brigade and sev- 
eral batteries previously advanced 
to Malvern Hill. It was soon 
discovered the enemy was pre- 
paring for an attack, both in front 
and on our left, as they were seen 
to emerge in great force in both 
directions. Two regiments, viz., 
IOHN carroll, the First l : . S. Chasseurs, and 

Co 1 Killed at Cold Harbor, June 1, 1864. the Sixty-first Pennsylvania Vol- 
unteers, moved up to the support of Griffin's battery, and the Sixty-si 1 
ond New York. With the three other regiments of my brigade, viz., 
Thirty-first and Twenty third Pennsylvania Volunteers and Firsl Long 
Island, I moved to the support of General Howe's brigade, and took 




PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



61 




up a position on the crest of the hill on the right of the tongue of woods. 
Subsequently the First U. S. Chasseurs and Thirty-first Pennsylvania 
Volunteers were ordered to take up their position in line of battle across 

the extreme point of this tongue of woods in support of General Pal- 
mer's brigade. The Twenty-third 
Pennsylvania Volunteers were 
sent to the support of General 
Howe's brigade, while the re- 
maining regiments. First Long 
Island Volunteers and Sixty-first 
Pennsylvania Volunteers, formed 
line of battle on the edge of tim- 
ber, almost perpendicular to the 
batteries. The enemy appearing 
in large force on the left, with 
the obvious intention of charging 
the batteries, the Long Island and 
Sixty-first Pennsylvania Volun- 
teers, changed front by the left, 
and forming in front and under 
the fire of the batteries, they held 
this position under a heavy fire 
of the enemy, until relieved ( their 
ammunition being exhausted) by the Twenty-third Pennsylvania Volun- 
teers, Colonel Neill, who continued a heavy fire upon the enemy until 
dark, when sixty rounds per man having been expended, they were 
relieved by a regiment of General Sickel's brigade. 

The First Chasseurs and the Thirty-first Pennsylvania Volunteers 
meanwhile had been under a heavy fire from the enemy's artillery and 
infantry, and after expending all their ammunition, they were relieved 
by some regiments of General Hooker's division. 

The brigade then returned to the position they had occupied in 
the morning, where they bivouacked until orders were received to take 
up the line of march. 

From early in the morning until dark, the brigade was exposed to 
a storm of shot and shell from the enemy's batteries, and during the 
afternoon was hotly engaged with a much superior force of the enemy's 
infantry. 

During the heat of the contest, and while the brigade was between 
the enemy and our own batteries (which were firing over their heads), 
several unfortunate accidents occurred, which resulted in the loss of 
several men. In consequence, I was induced to ride up to them, with 
a view of increasing the elevation of some of the pieces, and again to 
communicate with the division commander. General Couch, whom I 



ALBERT G. RUSSELL, 
Co. C. Killed at Cold Harbor, June i, 1864. 



62 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



found nearby, in a much exposed position, calmly directing; the opera- 
tions of his division, when I informed him of the fact that most of the 
regiments of my brigade had expended all of their ammunition (60 
rounds ), when a portion of General Hooker's division was ordered to 
relieve him. 

The regiments comprising my brigade all acquitted themselves 
throughout the battle in a highly commendable manner, and acted, 
with a very few exceptions, like veterans. If the Sixty-first Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteers ever lost anything previously, they more than regained 
it this time. The commanders of regiments — Colonel Shaler, of the 
First Chasseurs; Colonel Cross, of the First Long Island; Colonel 
Neill, of the Twenty-third Pennsylvania, and Lieutenant-Colonel Vallee, 

commanding temporarily the 
Sixty-first Pennsylvania — exhib- 
ited a great degree of coolness, 
and managed their regiments in 
a most satisfactory manner. Col- 
onel Williams' regiment having 
been engaged for the greater part 
of the time farther to the right 
with General Howe's brigade, I 
am unable to say more than this. 
From their uniform good conduct 
in other battles, I have no doubt 
that it and its commander con- 
ducted themselves most gallantly. 
In alluding to the line offi- 
cers, I should be doing a great 
injustice to my personal staff, 
Lieutenants Appleton and Slip- 
per, were I to omit alluding to 
their soldierly bearing and promptness in communicating my orders 
during the hottest of the fight, and, of some seven or eight it 
has been my lot to be engaged in during a long period of military 
life, the hottest of them all. These gentlemen — Lieutenant Appleton 
particularly — conducted regiments to their respective positions in the 
coolest and most gallant manner, for which they deserve especial at- 
tention. 

A tabular account, together with a nominal list of killed, wounded 
and missing, has already been forwarded. 

I am. captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. J. ABERCROMBIE, 
Brigadier-( ieneral, Commanding Brigade. 
Captain Francis A. Walker, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 




Co. E. 



HENRY TATE, 
Killed at Fait 1 laks, May ;i, i 1 "'.'. 



PENNSYLVANIA V< >LUNTEER INFANTRY. 



63 



REPORT OF BRIG. GEN. ALBION P. HOWE, 

Commanding First Brigade, at the Battle of Malvern Hill. 

Headquarters Howe's Brigade, Couch's Division. 

Harrison's Landing, Ya., July 5, 1862, 

Captain: — In obedience to the instructions from the headquarters 

of the hirst Division, Fourth Army Corps, I have the honor to submit 

a report of the operations of the brigade under my command at the 

battle of Malvern Hill, on the 1st instant. 




BVT. MAJ.-GEN'L DAVID A. RUSSELL, 
Division Commander Killed at Winchester, Sept. 19, 1864. 

The brigade on that day was composed of the following regiments, 
viz: The One Hundred and Second Pennsylvania, commanded by Col- 
onel Rowley ; the Ninety-eighth Pennsylvania, commanded by Colonel 
Ballier ; the Ninety-third Pennsylvania, commanded by Captain Long; 
the Sixty-second New York, commanded by Colonel Nevin, 
and the Fifty-fifth New York, commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel 
Thourot. 

The position of the brigade was on the right of the division line of 



64 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 




battle, the right of the brigade resting on a deep ravine running 
obliquely to the front, and impassable for artillery and cavalry, but prac- 
ticable for infantry, the edge of the ravine on the right being covered 
by a thin belt of woods. From the right the brigade line extended 
to the left in an open field, except at a small space of woods which 

covered the left centre. The 
ground in our rear was uncov- 
ered for three-fourths of a mile. 

In front of our line of battle 
the ground was open and admitted 
the easy passage of any troops ex- 
cept in front of our left centre, 
which was wooded, the cover ex- 
tending to within some 500 yards 
of our front. The brigade line was 
formed a little before 8 A. M., 
and immediately after Captain 
Moser's (?) New York battery re- 
ported to me and was posted in 
our line so as to sweep the open 
ground in our front, and if neces- 
sary to shell the woods. Before 
the enemy had completed his dis- 
position for attack, having already 
got some of his artillery into position in our front, an order was re- 
ceived withdrawing Captain Moser's (?) battery, and although the 
ground was admirably adapted for the play of artillery, I was left for a 
time without any with which I could reply to that of the enemy. A 
little before 9 A. M. the enemy succeeded in placing a field battery 
about 1200 yards in advance of our front, and a second battery at a 
more distant point to our right and front. 

When the enemy, without any annoyance from us, had quite 
completed his artilleryj preparations, he opened fire upon our lines 
with his two batteries. Their artillerymen were without the range of 
our rifles, and I ordered the brigade to lie down and await theadvance 
of their infantry. 

The rebel battery nearest us was worked with much, speed and 
some skill, occasionally doing some little injury within our lines ; but 
the battery more distant was not worthy of any notice, doing us no 
manner of injury or even approaching it. 

When tin- rebel batteries had continued their fire to their satisfai 
tion the enemy then formed, under cover of the woods in our front, a 
lar^c- 1 101 K of infantry, and attai ked our 1 entre. When the attacking 
fori e ' ame within the range of our arms our whole line sprung to their 



Co. E. 



WILLIAM JOHNSON, 
Killed at Cold Harbor, June i, 1864. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



65 



feet and poured into the enemy a withering fire. The rebels stood up 
well to their work .md largely outnumbered us, but our men had the 
vantage ground and wire determined not to yield it. The firing- con- 
tinued with much violence on both sides, but the fire of the enemy, 
being generally too high, did us comparatively little injury. Soon, 
however, the advantage of our grounds and the superiority of our arms 
became evident in the effect of our fire upon the enemy. The enemy 
began to waiver. I then ordered the One Hundred and Second Penn- 
sylvania, Colonel Rowley, which was held in reserve, to advance with 
our line upon the enemy. Nobly and gallantly did every man of the 
regiment respond to the order and the impetuous dash of our men the 
enemy could not stand, but gave way, and were sent back, much cut 
up and in disorder, over the ground on which they advanced. This 
success gave us much advantage of position, by allowing the left centre 
of the brigade line to rest upon the woods, some Soo yards in advance 
of our first position, and at the same time affording us a cross-fire 
upon any second attempt of the enemy upon our position. 

At this time I was reinforced 
by detachments from the Maine 
regiments, which, being posted on 
my right in support of the Ninety- 
third Pennsylvania, gave me much 
additional strength. I was soon 
again reinforced by Captain 
(Snow's) battery and the Twenty- 
third Pennsylvania regiment, Col- 
onel Neill. 

The enemy's batteries, after 
the repulse they met with, dis- 
continued their fire, but kept their 
position. 

On being reinforced by Cap- 
tain (Snow's) battery, I immed- 
iately placed it in a favorable posi- 
tii »n to bear upon the rebel battery 
that had annoyed us with its fire 
in the beginning of the action. 
The batter\- at once opened fire 
upon them with fine effect, the 
spherical case-shot doing good ex- 
ecution on their teams and among their artillerymen. The rebel bat- 
tery replied spiritedly for a time, and after a sharp cannonading from < lur 
battery it drew off the field. During this cannonading the enemy kept 
up a sharp fire of musketry at long range but with little or no effect. 




BRIG.-GE.VL J. J. ABERCR0MKIE, 
Brigade Commander. 



66 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



In the meantime I was again reinforced by two other Pennsyl- 
vania regiments, under the command of Colonel Barlow, from General 
Caldwell's brigade. The firing now became very heavy on the part of 
the division on my left and by the aid of a glass I could discover 
the rapid movement of bodies of the enemy to my left. At this time a 
division staff officer came to me for any assistance I could send to our 
left. I immediately advanced the battery and the three last regiments 
that had come to my support to the left. The enemy again came 
down upon the left and centre of our division in strong force and was 
again repulsed, Colonel Nevin's regiment, the Sixty-second New 
York, on the left of my brigade, gallantly joining with the left of the 

division in the repulse. The 
enemy again rallied and the firing 
continued sharp along the whole 
line of the division. 

About this time, between 6 
and 7 P. M., my brigade was 
reinforced by Captain De Russv's 
regular battery of the Fourth 
Artillery, which was at this time 
of great assistance, as night was 
coming on and the enemy seemed 
determined to make one more last 
eff< nt before abandoning the field. 
The battery took a fine position, 
and delivered its fire, with that of 
the whole brigade and division 

line, with marked effect, until 
GEORGE CLARK, 
Co.E Killed at Fair Oaks, May 3 i, 1862 alter o 1 . M.,wheil the enemy 

gave up the field. 

I inclose herewith a list of the casualties in the brigade during the 
d.iv, and when it is considered that the brigade was under tire over 
twelve hours, and a portion of the time hotly engaged, I think the 
whole loss sustained, being in the aggregate JoS, will be considered small. 

More than thanks are justly due to Captain J. Heron Foster, of 
tin- < )ne I [undred and Second Pennsylvania Regiment, a member ofmy 
staff, for the gallantry and untiring energy with which he performed far 
more that his duties from early morning until late at night, He was 
the only staff officer I had during most of the day, the other members 
of the stall being disabled early in the action. 

1 am, Captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

R. P. HOWE, 
Brigadier-( ieneral. 

Captain I' rani is A. Walker, 
Assistant Adjutant-General, Couch's Division, Fourth Corps. 



if%B 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



R7 



I leadquartcrs Couch's Division. 
Camp Near Harrison's Landing, Va. , July 5, 1862. 

General: — I have the honor to state that at 2 o'clock, A. M., 
July 1, current, General Sumner, to whose support I had marched with 
two brigades the night previous, gave me orders to return to the posi- 
tion occupied the evening be- 
fore on Malvern Hill. These 
brigades were posted on the 
right of the James River road, 
looking westward. The other 
brigade of the division — Aber- 
crombie's — lay a few hundred 
y a ids t o the rear. The 
Seventh Massachusetts and 
Second Rhode Island, being 
on detached service, much 
weakened the command. Fart 
of Porter's corps was to my 
left across the road, including 
two batteries. Kingsbury's 
splendid battery ( formerly 
Griffin's 1 was on my left front. 
Palmer's brigade in a strong 
wooded ravine a little to the 
right of the battery, and run- 
ning to the front 200 yards. 
One of Howe's regiments. 
Sixty-second New York, was 
strongly posted in a peach 
orchard to the rear and between the battery and Palmer. To 
the right of Palmer was an oat field, sloping to the front and skirted on 
the right by a tangled marsh and wooded bank. 

This was my right and held by General Howe. In the course of 
the morning he was re-enforced by part of Abercrombie's command, 
and the balance occupied the ground with Palmer. My own artillery 
being several miles to the rear, General Heintzelman sent me a battery 
for my right, but afterwards withdrew it, to place it, probably, on his 
own front. To my right lay Kearney, who, during the day, advanced 
two regiments of Robinson's brigade to sustain Howe in case of need. 
The ground in front of me was open to within 100 to 150 yards from 
right to left. Across the road in front of Griffin the country was open 
for three-fourths of a mile, making it very favorable for our artillery. 

General McClellan rode over the ground in the morning with the 
engineer officers, and designated the ground different corps were to 




BRIG.-GEN'L ALEXANDER SHALER, 
Brigade Commander. 



6S 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



occupy. General Porter also rode up about the same time. By 8 
o'clock A. M., there were signs of the rebels in front, and at nine 
o'olock, Berdans' sharpshooters were driven in. The rebels were driven 
off by artillery alone. From this time until I P. M. , the contest was 
on, both sides in the hands of the artillerists; then they pushed forward 
a column to carry the left of the line held by Griffin. They were driven 
back disorganized and cut up by our artillery alone. Their batteries 
played upon us without intermission, but owing to the care used in 
masking the men our loss from it was not serious, with the exception 
of a battery to the right, that enfiladed my position. 

About 3 P. M. , a brigade broke through the opening of the 
woods in front of Palmer and Abercrombie, but Kingsbury's battery, 
together with the steady fire of the Tenth Massachusetts and a charge 
of the Thirty-sixth New York, drove them back in confusion, the latter 
regiment capturing the colors of the Fourteenth North Carolina in hand 
conflicts. This movement of the rebels was a rash one or a ruse to 
draw our troops on to disadvantageous ground — undoubtedly the lat- 
ter — and it did not succeed. The enemy was now massing large columns 
on our front. 

At about 4. 30 P. M. , after an incessant cannonade, they boldly 
pushed forward a large column from their right in the open field to 
carry Griffin's position. The fire of the three batteries was concen- 
trated upon them. Kingsbury's 
battery having been withdrawn 
for ammunition, was relieved by 
three guns of Battery C, Rhode 
Island Artillery, and two guns 
(Allen's Fifth Massachusetts) 
under Captain Weeden. The at- 
tacking column kept on, continu- 
ally re-enforced, until within 
range of Griffin's rifles, when it 
was stopped and formed line. 

From this time until S P. M., 
there u.is enacted "in- of the sub- 
limesl sights ever presented in 
war, resulting in a glorious vic- 
tor) to our arms. 

The action now being gen 
eral, I assumed command oi the 
whole line for the time, ordered 
up the reserves on the left; placed in position regiments falling back, 
and halted those bravely moving forward, many of the regiments 
having already masked thi fire "t our artillery, Upon seeing the 
advance on the left, Abercrombie and Palmer pushed forward 




IOHN Mil I I VDY, 
Killed .11 Cold Harboi [un< 



PENNSYLVANIA V< (LUNTEER INFANTRY. 



69 




their brigades in front of the artillery, in order to drive back the foe. 
The enemy continually re-enforced their column of attack, besides 
advancing heavy reserves in support. Abercrombie and Palmer became 
engaged to their left and right. General Caldwell, of Richardson's 
division, having been sent to my 
support by General Sumner, now 
went into action joining my brave 
division, fiercely engaged. The 
enemy were making desperate 
efforts to drive in my right. Gen- 
eral Heintzelman sent me Seeley's 
battery, which, under DeRussy, 
chief of the artillery, and with the 
advice of General Howe, was es- 
tablished on the ground held by 
this latter officer. It did its duty 
well. 

General Porter came upon the 
ground about 6 P. M. Later 
General Sickles, of Hooker's divi- 
sion, reported to me with three 
regiments, leading his men 
directly into action, relieving 
some of my division, whose ammunition was expended. At about 
7 P. M. , General Meagher, with his brigade, reported to me from 
General Sumner, and was posted on the left of Griffin's batteries. 

Night closed upon us still fighting, the opposing forces only known 
by their line of fire, that of the rebels gradually slackening until 8.30 
P. M. .after which an occasional cannon shot from our batteries only broke 
the stillness that pervaded this bloody field. Thus ended the battle of 
Malvern Hill, which caused great carnage and demoralization among 
the best divisions of the enemy, with comparatively small loss on our 
side. 

Generals Abercrombie and Palmer formed a line with their brigades 
that not a private retreated from. General Howe, on the right, held 
his position and drove the enemy back. Your attention is particularly 
called to the reports of these officers accompanying; also to the reports 
of Generals Caldwell, Sickles and Meagher, for which I refer you to 
their division commanders and to those of the artillery officers from 
reports to their respective chiefs. This army did brilliant service. It 
could not have been excelled. 

My thanks are due to General Sumner for his prompt assistance 
and anticipation of my wants; also to General Heintzelman. General 
Kearney rode over my lines during the morning and I am indebted to 
him for some valuable information, as regards dispositions. 



JOHN McKERNON, 

Co. A, and Lieutenant Co. F, S2d P. V. 

Killed at Petersburg, April 2, 1865. 




# 



70 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



Captain D. F. Parker, division quartermaster, joined me on the 
field, also Lieutenant Eccleston, provost marshal. Brave and collected, 
these gentlemen were always ready to go where the fight was thickest. 
They have my thanks and admiration for their conduct. Lieutenant 
Smith. Eighth Illinois Cavalry, 
did me excellent service. Cap- 
tain Walker, assistant adjutant- 
general of my staff, and Lieutenant 
Burt, aide-de-camp, were near me 
to take my orders and anticipate 
my wishes on the held. 

Having received orders from 
( ieneral McClellan to fall back, 
my troops were gradually with- 
drawn from the field. Captain 
Benson, who had relieved the 
Massachusetts and Rhode Island 
batteries after dark, left one sec- 
tion of his artillery. General 
Sickles, whi i was very active on 
the field at this time, drew off the 
rear in admirable order. His 
brigade was the last to leave. 
This was at midnight. 

From some prisoners we learned that the enemy was falling back, 
expecting to be attacked in the morning. Both armies retreated ; the 
one because it was beaten, the other because it was a part of the plans 
of our general. 

I have the honor to be, General, very respectfully, vour obedient 
servant. 

D. A. COUCH, 

Brigadier General, Commanding First Division, Fourth Corps. 
Brigadier General S. Williams, A. A. G. 

Headquarters Army of the Potomac. 




HUGH McMICHAEL, 

Corporal Co. E. 

Died of Wounds Received at Cold Harbor. 



REPORT OF BRIGADIER GENERAL DARIUS N. COUCH, 

Commanding First Division of Operations June 25th to July 1st, in- 
cluding Skirmish on James River Road and Battle of Malvern 
Hill. 

Headquarters Couch's Division, 

Harrison's Landing, Va., July nth, 1862. 

Sir : — In obedience to instructions, I have the honor to report 
the following in reference to my division : 



72 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



On the morning of June 25th, I had orders from General Keyes 
to move forward two brigades to support Hooker, who was engaged 
with the enemy beyond Seven Pines. Palmer's and Howe's were 
pushed forward and held in reserve until about 2.30 P. M., when the 
former was ordered up by General McClellan to report to General 
Heintzelman. It was moved into the woods in front, where Hooker 
had been engaged, I accompanying the brigade rather as a volunteer, 
seeing that it was taken from under my command. It was deployed 
in the woods under Palmer, and lay there until next day. During 
the afternoon it was a good deal exposed to fire from some of the 
enemy's rifled guns and at night to a heavy fire of musketry. The 
loss in killed and wounded was as follows : Commissioned officers — 
killed, 1 ; wounded 4. Enlisted men — killed 7 ; wounded, 41. 

On the 27th, at near night, Palmer's brigade, with the exception 
of the Seventh Massachusetts, which was moved down towards the 
White Oak Swamp, was ordered to the Chickahominy, to support our 
troops falling back to the right bank of the stream. Abercrombie's 
brigade was ordered to Golding's Hill to support Smith. These 
brigades were recalled the same night, and at 12.30 o'clock that night 
I was directed to fall back with my whole division and cross White 
Oak Bridge. Crossing that bridge, I was ordered by General Keyes 
to take position at the junction of the James River, New Market and 

Charles City roads. This impor- 
tant post was occupied by my 
division, Peck, with a part of his 
small division, occupying ground 
t<> my right and left. 

On the morning of the 29th 
of June some of our cavalry mi 
the James River road were driven 
in by a battalion of North Caro- 
lina cavalry, who charged clear 
into my lines, which were so 
masked as not to be seen. Five 
guns and a few rifle shots broke 
them completely up in a few 
minutes, killing, wounding ami 
capturing 80 to too of them, with 
no loss to the division. 

In the course nf the morning 
Sykes' brigade crossed tin- swamp and formed on my right, and many 
other troops in tin- course of the day came up. That night my divi- 
iion formed the advance of the corps, making a night march to Haxall's 
below Turkey Bridge, on the James River. It was accomplished by 




JOHN F. RE] 
Sergeant t Company 1 . 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



73 



sunrise, being one of the most fatiguing man-lies imaginable, but it 
u.i-~ borne by all without a murmur. The Second Rhode Island and 
Seventh Massachusetts were ordered forward to Turkey Bridge, and 
at noon, the ,;<>th instant, Abercrombie's brigade in the same direction. 
Al between 3 and 4 P. M. 1 was directed by General McClellan to 
move toward Malvern Hill, and attack the enemy in flank should they 
succeed in tuning our lines on the hill. They did not, and I moved 
forward and took a strong position for the night, but at dark had 




JOHN S. LINTON, , FRANK M. WORTH, 

Sergt Company H. Color Sergt. 

orders to push forward to Sumner's support, who held the junction of 
the roads occupied by my division two days before. 

At 2 o'clock that night Sumner marched to Malvern Hill, my 
division of two brigades in the advance, he directing me to take post 
where the division was the night before. Arriving at daylight we 
began getting into the position we held the day of our glorious victory 
of Malvern Hill, for an account of which I beg to refer you to a copy 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



of my report to the major general commanding the Army of the 
Potomac. I have the honor to inclose a copy of that report. 
I am, Captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

D. N. COUCH, 
Brigadier General, Commanding Division. 
Cai't. C. C. Suydam, 

Asst. Adj. Gen., Headquarters Fourth Corps. 



In this battle the gunboats on the James River protected 
the left wing of the army by its fire. A few of their shells fell 
short, landing in our lines, but, according to the Confederate 
reports, the naval batteries did them little damage. 

Here we lay until about 
2 A. M., when the army moved 
off in the direction of Harri- 
son's Landing. Loss, fifty-five 
killed and wounded. 

We found the whole Army 
of the Potomac massed in the 
fields near the landing. Soon 
was heard the familiar screech- 
ing of a shell, and a short while 
afterwards Kearney's Division 
attacked the battery and drove 
them off Lrlington Heights. 
Thus ended the Seven Days' 
Fight. 

About 4 P. M. the regi- 
ment was given ten rounds of 
ammunition and a ration of crackers, and, amid a rain storm, 
started for the front, where they were engaged all night and 
part of the next day in building breastworks. It remained in 
this locality until the army left the Peninsula, doing picket 
duty meanwhile; it also composed part of a force sent to 
Malvern Hill to drive back the enemy, who were demonstrating 
from Richmond. This movement was under General Hooker, 
the brigade being commanded by Colonel Neill ami the regi- 
ment by Captain Glenn. It required a rapid march to get 
|n isM'ssii 'ii "I the lull. Inn proved su< cessful. 

Harrison's Landing was a large plantation on which was 
the old colonial mansion of Westover, where the ancestors of 




ANTHONY SCHAFFER, 

Co. H. 

I tied <>i Wounds Received at Cold Harbor. 



PENNSYLVANIA V< ILUNTEER INFANTRY, 



75 



General William Henry Harrison, of Indian War fame, and of 
General W. H. Harrison, of the Civil War, both presidents of 
the United States, once held ownership. At the Landing was 
an immense fleet of transports. One night the Rebs placed a 
battery on the opposite heights and shelled the fleet and camps, 
but they were soon driven off by the gunboats. While here, 
the Armv of the Potomac was reviewed by President Lincoln. 
No doubt all will recall the first and only time, as an organiza- 
tion, that we saw "Old Abe," with his high hat and long legs, 



iC^IU^^-™^ 



i, 



31 



?lfe* 



tt»fc^ 






ism 

% ? 




riding for all he was 
worth along the line, with 
General McClellan and 
staff escorting him. We 
all had great respect for 
the " Grand Old Man," 
and our caps went up in 
the air as he swept by 
amid a whirlwind of 
cheers. 

The Army of the 
Potomac, being ordered 
to the support of Pope, 
operating on the line of 
the Rappahannock, most 
of the troops were sent down the James on transports, while 
Couch's Division was marched overland to Yorktown. The 
first day upon reaching Charles City Cross Roads, we formed 
line of battle to check the enemy ; the next day was a long 
march across the Chickahominy, passing through the old 
colonial town of Williamsburg, company front, with one drum 
for music. Here we camped on the old battlefield, reaching 
Yorktown the next day, where the regiment was employed in 









76 



HISTORY OF THF. TVYKXTY-THIKD RKOIMKXT 



turning the breastworks that had been built by the Army of 
the Potomac when it sieged that place. 

This old colonial settlement we found very much dilapi- 
dated. It was here that Comwallis surrendered to Washington 
and Lafayette, thus ending the Revolutionary War. The old 
Nelson House was still standing. While here the boys were 
kept busy throwing down the works, but they had a good 
time, nevertheless — salt water bathing and fishing for oysters 
and crabs, with which the York River and its tributaries 
seemed to abound. 

On August 28th the regiment embarked on the transport 
" City of Richmond," proceeding up the Potomac. It was 
found that the rebels had possession at Acquia Creek, so the 
transport was compelled to change its destination to Alex- 
andria. This was our second visit to this old colonial town, 
where Lord Fairfax, General Washington and others were 
wont to visit in the early days of Virginia. Christ Church, 
the Carlyle House of colonial days, and the Marshall House, 
where Colonel Ellsworth was shot in the Civil War, with the old 
slave pen, were well worth visiting. But battles were being 

fought away off at Bull Run, 
and, as soon as the brigade 
was landed, we, being the rear 
of the army, made a forced 
march for the front, arriving 
in time to participate in the 
action at Chantilly. That 
night the regiment did picket 
duty on the field, and the next 
day it supported a battery 
until 3 P. M., when, with the 
division — Couch's serving 
under Hooker — it was de- 
tailed to cover the rear, form- 
ing line of battle several times, 
the enemy following as far as 
Fairfax. 

Fairfax we found with the usual court house and few 
brick buildings. It proved to be the center of the wealthy 
class of that section. Not far off was Mount Vernon, the 
home of Washington, but it was not on our line of march, so 




IIF.XKY W. BANTOM, 
Co. 1 ■ 1 'ted January ;;, 1864. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



77 




JAMES SWEENEY, 

Killed at Cold Harbor, June i, 1864 



we did not have the pleasure or opportunity to pay our 
respects to the grave of the "Father of His Country." We 
learn that while no troops were ever engaged on the planta- 
tion, many Confederates and Yankees visited the old home- 
stead, and, be it said to the 
credit of both, neither the 
homestead nor grave were 
disturbed in the least. 

With the Army of the 
Potomac the regiment started 
on the Maryland campaign. 
Lee having crossed into Mary- 
land on his invasion, we 
crossed the Potomac at Chain 
Bridge and bivouacked at 
Rockville. Here, on the nth, 
the brigade was joined by the 
One Hundred and Twenty- 
second New York. At Pool- 
ville the Twenty-third Penn- 
sylvania, the Thirty-sixth 
New York, a Rhode Island battery and a squadron of cavalry 
was detached, under the command of Colonel Neill, to guard 
the fords from White's to Nolan's Ferry. This was the point 
where Lee had crossed with his army, and the regiment was 
engaged in picking up his stragglers, broken-down wagons, 
etc. This position was the extreme left of the army during 
the battles of South Mountain and Antietam, and the regiment 
was, in consequence, prevented from taking an active part in 
these actions, although it had the misfortune to lose one officer 
and twenty-four men by capture. 

Information having been received that a quantity of arms 
was stored in a barn across the river, Lieutenant Garsed, with 
twenty-four men of Company B, was detailed to destroy them. 
Crossing the river with three of the cavalry, he deployed his 
line to a house half a mile from the river, and, while inspect- 
ing the barn, the rebel cavalry, under command of Colonel 
White, charged upon them with three columns. In a short 
while the squad was surrounded and compelled to surrender. 
The only man that escaped from Company B was James J. 
Dougherty, who explained, when he entered our lines, that he 



HISTORY ()F THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



fell into a ditch, and when the Rebs got the boys all together, 
White found one missing, and tramped a horse up and down 
the ditch where " Doc " lay, but did not come far enough to 
reach him. He remained there until dusk, when he crawled 
down to the river, and was soon safe within our lines. When 
the firing began, Colonel Neill sent over the squadron of 
Rhode Island cavalry, who scouted all the roads and by-ways 
to Leesburg, but could get no tidings of White's forces. 
While here the regiment had a good time, as the country was 
in good condition for forage; it was a land of milk and honey. 
On the 20th the command was relieved by a new brigade 
of the Third Corps and on its way to join the division. Captains 
Wallace and Wood with Companies A and E were detailed to 
proceed to Harper's Ferry. Fording the river they captured 
about twenty-five prisoners of Stonewall Jackson's Corps, from 
whom we learned that General Miles had surrendered with 
10,000 men, thus leaving Maryland and Bolivar Heights, with 
the guns, in possession of Jackson, and giving him an oppor- 
tunity of pushing on and joining Lee in time to save his army 
from rout or capture at Antietam. 

That night the regiment 
joined the brigade at Sharps- 
burg and marched to Downs- 
ville, where it found the brig- 
ade was part of the Third 
Division, Sixth Corps. About 
this time several men of the 
regiment were transferred to 
the artillery to fill up the bat- 
teries that had become de- 
pleted during the Peninsula 
campaign. While here feb 
Stuart crossed the Potomac 
at Hancock's, on his raid, and 
Couch's Division was sent to 
intercept him. After a forced 
march over the North Moun- 
tains, it reached the upper fords and, the men knowing 
that the lower fords, which they had shortly before left, were 
guarded, concluded that Jeb Stuart's cavalry were bottled. 
The next day it was ordered back to camp, the rebel cavalry 




[OHN / \i v 
Corp Co K Killed at Cold Harbor, June i, 1864. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



having recrossed the lower fords without firing a shot, the brig- 
ade guarding that part of the river, having been relieved and 
sent back to Washington, while Jeb Stuart was lying off in 
the woods awaiting such an opening. Why this brigade was 
taken off the fords when Jeb Stuart's cavalry was on our 
side of the river, giving him the opportunity to escape, has 
never been explained. While here, the regiment was presented 
with a new stand of colors by friends from Philadelphia, and 
on November the first it crossed the Potomac on a pontoon at 
Berlin, with the Sixth Corps, passing en route Union, where we 
found a rebel hospital full of their wounded in the recent battles. 

Passing through Salem and Rectortown, which were the 
headquarters of Mosby's com- 
mand, this section of the coun- 
try was scoured night and day 
with guerrillas ; stragglers, 
sutlers' wagons and sparsely 
guarded wagon-trains being 
their special prey. 

On November ioth, while 
at New Baltimore, the regi- 
ment was drawn up in line to 
hear read the farewell address 
of General McClellan, who was 
succeeded by General Burn- 
side as commander of the 
army. This removal of " Little 
Mac" created considerable 
feeling.as he was fairly idolized 
by the Army of the Potomac. 




Sergt.-Maj 



IRA WEBSTER. 
Killed at Cold Harbor, June i, 1S64. 



Headquarters Army of Potomac. 

Camp near Rectortown, Va. 

November 7, 1862. 
Officers and Soldiers of 

the Army of the Potomac : 
An order of the President devolves upon Major-General Burnside 
the command of this army. 

In parting from you I cannot express the love and gratitude I 
have for you. As an army, you have grown up under my care. In 
you I have never found doubt or coldness. 

The battles you have fought under my command will live in our 
nation's history. The glory you have achieved, our mutual perils and 



so 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



fatigues, the graves of our comrades fallen in battle and by disease, the 
broken forms of those whom wounds and sickness have disabled, the 
strongest associations which can exist among men, unite us still by an 
indissoluble tie. We shall ever be comrades in supporting the consti- 
tution of our country and the nationality of the people. 

George B. McClellan, 
Major-General United States Army. 




CAPT. I. (HIS HILLEBRAND, FIRST SERGT. \VM. K. PEDDLE 
and < 'aptain's < 'unk. 

After leaving here we bivouacked for an afternoon and 
night at Belle Plain, a most barren and bleak stretch of coun- 
try, where the men were required to go at least a mile to 
find wood or water, picketing and skirmishing with the enemy 
to Stafford Court House. There we found a court house 
and jail with a few other buildings. The regiment remained 
in camp near White Oaks Church, engaged in picket duty 
and other details, and working on the construction of Potomac 
Creek Bridge — a high trestle work which the Confederates 
had destroyed— until the opening of the Battle of Fredricks- 




81 



82 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 




burg. On the night of the ioth, we crossed the pontoons 
with the advance at Franklin Crossing, two miles below 
the town, near the Bernard Mansion, and were part of the 
skirmish line that drove back Jackson's skirmishers to Hamil- 
ton's Crossing. While on this 
skirmish line a large, portly 
man, dressed in citizen's 
clothes, came riding across the 
fields, holding his hat in his 
hand. When he entered out- 
lines, he claimed to be the 
owner of the Bernard Mansion, 
and asserted that he was seek- 
ing his cattle. He was, how- 
ever, sent back to General 
Franklin, commanding the left 
grand division. The mansion 
referred to, a brownstone struc- 
ture, was burned down that 
winter while the Confederate 
officers were holding a recep- 
tion and ball in its spacious 
rooms. During the battle it was used as a field hospital. 

About 4 P. M. the regiment was relieved and massed with 
the division for a charge. Here it lay beyond the head of the 
pontoon bridge, subject to constant artillery fire, which fortu- 
natelv passed over us, doing very little damage. On the 
morning of the 13th, we were sent to support a battery hotly 
engaged beyond the Bowling Green Road. To cross this road, 
the line went over with a rush, as the enemy's artillery were 
sweeping it, reaching our battery, the men hugged the ground 
while the batteries had quite a duel at short range, our artillery 
blowing up one of the caissons of the enemy. 

About 4 P. M. a tremendous lire was Opened upon the 
line from the Confederate heights, but they made no attempt to 
leave the works to attack, and we occupied the same position 
until night. On the way to occupy this position, we met the 
Nineteenth Pennsylvania, which had also been engaged in the 
conflict As Philadelphians, we knew each other, and, the 
boys being hungrv, we showered them with hall ol our rations 
mI crackers. 



(•,,.(-, 



HENRY ERXST, 
Killed at Cold Harbor, June I, 1864. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



83 



In the early part of the battle. General Vinton, of the 
Second Brigade, Second Division, was shot, and Colonel Neill, 
who, a few days previous, was promoted to Brigadier General, 
bid the boys a hasty farewell as he left to take his new 
command. 

That was the last service we did under " Bucky " Neill, 
as strict a disciplinarian, as brave a soldier of the Republic, 
and as perfect a gentleman as the army has ever produced. 
The Twenty-third fairly loved him, and he loved his bovs. He 
remained with the Army of the Potomac, in command of a 
brigade, until the windup, Neill's Brigade being one of the 
righting brigades of the Sixth Corps. He continued in service 
after the war, and was retired at the age of 65 as Colonel in 
the Regular Army. Six months after his retirement, in 1886, 
he died at Philadelphia, and was buried at West Point, the 
survivors of the Twenty-third escorting his body to the train. 

On the night of the 13th the regiment was sent to the 
extreme right of the Left Grand Division at Hazel Run holding 
this position until the army recrossed the Rappahannock, on 
the night of the 15th. Loss, 22 men. 

The principal inci- l^. 

dents in this battle were 
the laying of the pontoon 



<-\t 






bridges in front of the ::"-«;' 



town and the desperate 'w .'■-'- - '' , aJr*v~- '-"' §& 
nehtine to <ret possession a_; . ; . . - _ *r^U— ^'M^f -f-. 



fighting to get possession 
of it. This and the lower 
bridges gave a crossing 
for the army. The enemy 
having the ridge and hills 
well entrenched, while our 
army had the plains, gave 
the Confederates the ad- 
vantage. Burnside con- 
cluded to turn the enemy's 
right and sent General 
Meade, with his division, skirmishers holding the line. 

the Pennsylvania Reserves, to assault the Confederate position 
at Hamilton Crossing. This was done with great deter- 
mination and gallantry, Meade piercing to his third line, but, 




s-1 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



not being properly supported, he was compelled to return, 
the division covering itself with glory. 

Another assault on the key to the position was made by 
the Second Corps, on the left, at Marye's Heights. They 
charged the position five times by divisions, losing 5,000 
killed and wounded. These troops of the Second Corps were 
some of the best in the Army of the Potomac and made a des- 
perate and heroic attempt to carry the heights. However, the 
assaults proved failures. Darkness coming on, the army lay 
awaiting the enemy's attack, but on the night of the 15th, it 
recrossed the river. Loss: Union, killed and wounded 12,503 ; 
Confederate, killed and wounded 5,575. 

The old town of Fredericksburg, which gave the name to 

the battle, was the home of the 
mother of Washington. It 
was a brick town, founded in 
the colonial days, and its 
wharves and those opposite, 
at Falmouth, in the days be- 
fore the railroads, were al- 
ways regarded as important 
ports in the sea carrying trade 
on the Rappahannock. Staf- 
ford Heights opposite, which 
was occupied with our bat- 
teries during the action, was 
composed of a series of hills, 
upon which once were mag- 
JOHN ,. AMES nificent estates. One of these 

Sergt.Co. C. Killed Cold Harbor, June i, 1864. was the Lacy House, from 

which the distinguished Confederate General Robert E. Lee 
had married his wife. Another of these plantations was that 
of Dr. Smith, one of Virginia's celebrated physicians. 

The regiment next went into winter quarters near the 
Sixth Army ( 'nrps I h-.nl. |uarters. 1 .icutenant-Colonel John 
Fly, who had been temporarily absent, rejoined the regiment, 
and was promoted colonel to date from December 13th. It 
remained here until January [8th, 1863, when we moved 
with the army to United States Ford in anticipation of a 
hard-fought campaign ; but, like all attempts to move a large 
army in midwinter, through the inclemency of the weather 




PENNSYLVANIA VOMWTKKK INFANTRY. 



85 



and the condition of the roads, it ended in what was known as 
the " mud march." The regiment returned to its camp in good 
time, being more fortunate than many other commands, which 
were mired in the mud for nearly a week before they got back 
to quarters. The "Johnnies," who could see this counter- 
marching from their picket stations, on several occasions 
offered to " come over and give us a lift." During the balance 
of the winter the regiment was engaged in picket duty. 

General Burnside, having been removed at his own 
request, was succeeded by General Joseph Hooker, known 
in the service as " Fighting Joe " Hooker on account of his 
gallant conduct in action. General Hooker began at once a 
reorganization of the army under his command. He ordered 
each corps to wear distinctive 
badges, that of the Sixth Corps 
being the Greek Cross. Each 
division was designated by a 
separate color, the First Divi- 
sion being red, the second 
white, and the third blue. 
The Twenty-third, therefore, 
wore the blue cross, being part 
of the Third Division, Sixth 
Corps. 

Upon the opening of the 
campaign, Hooker moved the 
army and, crossing the Rapi- 
dan, came upon the rear of Lee 
at Chancellorsville, compell- 
ing him to fall back from his 
strong position at Fredericksburg to meet the threatened at- 
tack. To circumvent this movement he moved the Second and 
Sixth Corps with a view to attacking his old line. After he had 
passed over the Rapidan and moved towards Lee's rear, 
he ordered the Sixth Corps to cross the Rappahannock and 
take the Heights. This was considered an impregnable posi- 
tion, as the previous year, in the battle of Fredericksburg, 
Marye's Heights, which was the key to the position, was 
charged by the Second Corps, one of the best in the army, 
in five distinctive assaults by divisions, but met with a reverse, 




JACOB KEITH, 
Killed at Cold Harbor, June i, 1864. 



86 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 




losing 5000 killed and wounded. To retain this position Lee 
had left General Early's command to hold the works. 

The pontoon boats were carried on the backs of the men 
of the brigade to the river in order to deceive the enemy. 

The crossing was made after 
considerable trouble with the 
Confederates, their skirm- 
ishers, however, being driven 
back from their rifle pits to the 
Bowling Green Road. After 
getting possession of this road, 
our brigade, taking the ad- 
vance, moved along that road 
to the right in the direction of 
Fredericksburg, meeting the 
enemy in a fortified position 
at Hazel Run, the Sixty-fifth 
New York (the Chasseurs) 
leading, charged and drove 
the enemy back, clearing the 
way for entrance into the 
town. The Twenty-third then 
took the advance, and, with a heavy line of skirmishers, pro- 
ceeded in the early morning, under a heavy fog, to within thirty 
yards of the stone wall, at the foot of Marye's Heights. Here it 
laid until about 11 A. M., when a grand assault was made on 
the Heights by two storming columns and a battle line com- 
posed of the right column, commanded by Colonel George C. 
Spear,who fell while gallantry leading the attack, the Sixty-first 
Pennsylvania Volunteers, Major Dawson, and Forty-third New 
York, Colonel Baker. This column was supported by the 
Sixty-seventh New York (First Long Island), Colonel Cross, 
and the Eighty-second Pennsylvania Volunteers, Major Bassett, 
under command of Colonel Shaler. 

The left column was composed of the Seventh Massachu- 
setts, Colonel Johns, who fell severely wounded in the assault, 
and the Thirty-sixth New York, Lieutenant-Colonel Walsh. 

The line of battle, Colonel Burnham, the Fifth Wisconsin, 
Colonel Allen, as skirmishers; Sixth Maine, Lieutenant- 
Colonel Harris, Thirty-first New York, Colonel Jones. 

The storming column moved on the plank road and to 



WILLIAM MAGUIRE, 

Co. C 

Died of Wounds Received at Cold Harbor. 



PENNSYLVANIA V< (LUNTEER INFANTRY. 



s; 



the right of it, piercing the enemy's flank. The line of battld 
under Colonel Burnham, advanced on the double quick from 
the town. When they reached the point at which the Twenty 
third had been lying in the field all morning, the latter, with- 
out awaiting orders, joined with cheers the charging column, 
entered the sunken road, and, scaling the heights, were soon 
in possession of the fortification, capturing the entrenched 
position with the guns of Washington Artillery. After crossing 
the sunken road and scaling the heights the fire of their bat- 
teries was of no effect, as they could not deflect the guns. 
Some of the Confederates on the heights stood to their guns ; 
one in particular, when called to surrender, held the lanyard 
of his gun and was knocked over before he would let go. An 
onslaught was made on the redoubt on the apex of the hill, 
while others rushed to the rear of the works and compelled the 
batterv men to dismount as they were trying to get off their 
pieces. After clearing up everything on the front it was seen 
that the entire line had been swept by the Sixth Corps, the 
Twenty-third losing six killed and seventy-two wounded. 

General Shaler, the brig- 
ade commander in charge of 
the line, supporting the right 
charging column, distin- 
guished himself in this charge 
by rushing to the front with 
the colors, as the line was 
struggling to cross the cause- 
way or canal on the plank 
road. He was granted a Con- 
gressional Medal of Honor. 

While Longstreet in his 
book speaks of five brigades 
holding this position, the forti- 
fication was well manned by 
infantry and artillery and the 
command that seemed to have 
been in the sunken road was 
a Mississippi brigade, which broke to their right around the 
rear of the hill, when the assaulting line swept into the road. 

About 2.30 P. M. the brigade was advanced in the direc- 
tion of Chancellorsville, the Sixth Corps being then in the rear 



! 

.1 








JAMES M. LINNARD, 

Captain Co. C. 



88 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 




of Lee's army. At Salem Church and Heights the enemy was 
met. Here the regiment supported Haxhammer's Battery, 
and at daylight it was ordered on the front line, where it 
remained. Several of what the boys called rotten shells were 

fired from our battery in the 
rear, falling among the men of 
the regiment, but Lieut. -Col. 
Glenn had this fire discon- 
tinued. When the movement 
by the corps to the rear began, 
the regiment withdrew across 
the open field, the enemy ad- 
vancing ; the line would then 
be again advanced, pushing 
the enemy back. This was 
kept up until it was quite dark. 
The Sixth Corps was here 
in position in a half circle. It 
appears that Lee sent back all 
his army — excepting 13,000 
left to confront Hooker at 
Chancellorsville, under Gen- 
eral Jeb Stuart — and attacked the corps on its flanks and front. 
After desperate fighting, the enemy being repulsed in all his 
attacks, the lines were maintained until after dark, when, with 
the balance of the corps, it was ordered to recross the river at 
Banks' Ford. When the regiment reached the pontoon bridge 
the enemy seemed to have direct range of the crossing as the 
shells were dropping all around us. While we were awaiting our 
turn to cross the river, Major Wallace, with three companies, 
was scut back to cover the rear until relieved ; this meant they 
were to be abandoned and captured. Upon moving out through 
the woods, he found the front occupied by our troops. He 
sent Sergeant Karney back to report, and orders came to 
rejoin the regiment at once. Crossing the pontoon the regi- 
ment proceeded to its old camp, near Falmouth, reaching 
there about 2 A. M. the morning of the 5th. Loss, twenty 
wounded. 

General Sedgwick, the corps commander, reported in 
this campaign, that the Sixth Corps lost in killed, wounded 



JAMES MULLIN, 

Co. C 

Killed at Cold Harbor, June I, [864. 



PENNSYLVANIA V< (LUNTEER INFANTRY. 



89 



and missing, 4700 men, but m> property, excepting a few 
wagons anda blacksmith's forge. 

Lieutenant Johnson, of the Twenty-third, on General 
Shaler's staff, states that in the distribution of the regimen is 
of the brigade prior to the charge at Marye's Heights, the 
Twenty-third was lying in front of the stone wall at the fool 
of the heights, the One Hundred and Twenty-second New 
York and the Chasseurs, Sixty-fifth New York, were sent in 
the direction of Taylor's Hill, to the right, as a feint, while Gen- 
eral Shaler, with the Kighty-second Pennsylvania, and " First 
Long Island, Sixty-seventh New York," were the support- 
ing column to the Sixty-first Pennsylvania and Forty-third 
New York, under command of Colonel Spear, who moved out 
from the town as the right charging column. When they got 
on the heights General Shaler, looking down to the field in 
front of the stone wall, found that the Twenty-third was not 
there. Seeing a line of blue over near the little bricked-walled 
cemetery on the apex of the heights, he dispatched Lieutenant 
Johnson to learn what troops they were. He returned and re- 
reported it was the 23d Penn- 
sylvania, which had joined 
Colonel Burnham's line as it 
swept over them on the 
charge. Nobody could find 
out who gave the order ; it 
was spontaneous,-and just at 
a most critical moment, when 
the regiment was badlv 
needed to assist in capturing 
that strong position. 

General Longstreet, in 
his " Memoirs — Manassas to 
Appomattox," says as to the 
assault in December, 1862 : 

" A series of braver, more 
desperate charges than those 
hurled against the troops in 
the sunken road was never known, and piles and cross-piles of 
dead marked a field such as I never saw before or since." 
(Page 315.) 

As to the assault of May 3, 1863, he says, on page 330, 




DeWITT c palmer, 
Co. H, 23d P. V. and Co. E, S2d Pa. Vols. 
Killed at Winchester, September 19, 1864. 



90 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



that it was probably a mistake to draw McLaws away from 
his position at Marye's Hill where he and Ransom had success- 
fully held against six or seven severe attacks of the Burnside 
battle, with three brigades, two of his own and one of 
Ransom's. 



mm§m 




■ i L : 

V f: . i- i 

9 ' I 






V.^ 




■ ■> ■ ■ ■• ■ ■ x \ 

; . . & 







■"\ 



\ 



BATTERY GOING INTO ACTION. 

General Early was assigned to that position with five 
brigades. He was attacked by about one-fourth the'number 
ol McLaws' assailants, the position was carried and Early 
driven off in confusion, losing, besides large number as 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



91 




prisoners, many pieces of artillery. His special assignment 
was to defend the plank mad against the enemy's march to 

attack General Lee's rear. Instead, he retreated by the 

Telegraph Road, leaving the plank road free for the enemy. 

After driving Early off, the 

enemy marched by the plank 

road and Early marched back 

to his late position at Marye's 

Hill. So General Lee was 

obliged to take Mcl.aws and 

Anderson from his battle at 

Chancellorsville to drive back 

the force threatening his rear. 

Following are a few ex- 
tracts from the report of Major 
General John Sedgwick, com- 
manding the Sixth Corps, 
as to Marye's and Salem 
Heights. * * * "Two 
storming columns were 
formed composed as follows : 
Right column, commanded 
by Colonel George C. Spear, who fell while gallantly lead- 
ing it; the Sixty-first Pennsylvania Volunteers, Major Daw- 
son, and Forty-third New York, Colonel Baker. This 
column was supported by the Sixty-seventh New York 
(First Long Island), Colonel Cross, and the Eighty-second 
Pennsylvania Volunteers, Major Bassett, under command of 
Colonel Shaler. Left column — the Seventh Massachusetts, 
Colonel Johns, who fell severely wounded in the assault, and 
the Thirty-sixth New York, Lieutenant-Colonel Walsh. 

" Line of battle, Colonel Burnham — the Fifth Wisconsin, 
Colonel Allen, as skirmishers ; Sixth Maine, Lieutenant-Col- 
onel Harris ; Thirty-first New York, Colonel Jones ; and the 
Twenty-third Pennsylvania, Colonel Ely, the latter regiment 
volunteering. 

" The columns moved on the plank road and to the right 
of it, directly up the heights. The line of battle advanced on 
the double quick to the left of the plank road, against the rifle- 
pits, neither halting nor firing a shot until they had driven the 
enemy from their lower line of works. In the meantime, the 



WILLIAM II. MYERS, 

Co. I, 23d P. V. and Lieutenant Co. K, 82d 1*. V. 

Killed at Sailors' Creek, April 6, rS65. 



92 



HISTORY OF THK TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



storming columns had pressed forward to the crest, and car- 
ried the works in the rear of the rifle-pits, capturing the guns 
and many prisoners. These movements were gallantly 
executed under a most destructive fire. 

" * * * The losses of the Sixth Corps in these opera- 
tions were 4700, killed, wounded and missing. We captured 
from the enemy, according to the best information we could 
obtain, five battle flags, fifteen pieces of artillery, nine of 
which were brought off, the others falling into the hands of 
the enemy upon the subsequent reoccupation of Fredericks- 
burg by his forces, and 1400 prisoners, including many officers 
of rank. No material of anv kind belonging to the corps fell 
into the hands of the enemy, except several wagons and a 
forge that were passing through Fredericksburg at the time 
of its reoccupation by the Confederate forces. 

The Twenty-third remained in camp near Falmouth, 
doing picket duty, until June 6th, when, with the Sixth Corps, 
it again crossed the Rappahannock at Deep Run. The regi- 
ment was placed on the skirmish line, close up to the enemy's 
works. Heavy skirmishing was kept up from breastworks 

and rifle-pits, resulting in 
considerable loss, shot and 
shell being freely used. 
Sharpshooters on both sides 
were very active until the 
1 3th. Loss, several men 
wounded. 

Lee having started on 
his invasion of the North, 
the Army of the Potomac 
following. The Sixth Corps, 
which had been threatening 
the enemy's lines, recrossed 
the river and assumed the 
rear position in the Gettys- 
burg campaign. The regi- 
ment was repeatedly en- 
gaged in picket duty while on the march. The weather was 
intensely hot, and the movements being at times forced, 
it told heavily upon the endurance of the men, quite a 
number of the corps being sunstruck. On the way up 




MAI HEW M \XI.HTT. 
Co. G. Killed at Fair Oaks, Ma] [,1862. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



93 




WASH FROM THE SAME 
CANTEEN. 



through Virginia the regiment went into bivouac on the 
farm of Colonel White, near White's Ford, where, in [862, 
Company B was captured. On their return from the rebel 
prisons the members of the company spoke so highly of 
the treatment accorded them by 
White and his command that 
nothing was disturbed on his 
place. Here the regiment was 
given rations, and quite a supply 
was left at White's home for use 
of his family, he being then ab- 
sent with Lee's army. The regi- 
ment continued the march, via 
Poolsville, New Market and Man- 
chester, to Westminister, a place 
noted for its Catholic College. 
While going into camp here at 
8 P. M. of July 1st, news was received of the battle going 
on at Gettysburg, thirty-six miles away. The corps was at 
once put in motion, our brigade leading, but after marching 
two miles it was found that the guide had taken the wrong 
road. Bv countermarching, however, the command finally 
struck the Baltimore Pike. A rumor being circulated just at 
this time, that General Hooker had been relieved and that he 
was to be succeeded by General McClellan, the men exhibited 
their joy while on the march by singing"* and in other 
ways manifesting pleasures, but we soon found the report 
was without foundation, and that the new commander of 
the Army of the Potomac was a Pennsylvanian — General 
George G. Meade — who remained in that position until 
the close of the war. The march towards Gettysburg was 
a tiresome one, but the boys seemed unmindful of the 
fatigue. They knew that the Sixth Corps had been sent 
for to assist in driving Lee back and they were getting there 
as fast as possible. We arrived on the battle-field at 4 P. M., 
of the 2nd of July, and were immediately ordered to the sup- 
port of the Fifth Corps, then hotly engaged in checking the 
enemv, who was forcing the Third Corps back from their ad- 
vanced position at the Emmettsburg Road. Forming en masse, 
with cheers the corps took up a position to the right of Little 
Round Top, only one Brigade (Wheaton's) becoming en- 



!>4 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



gaged, under command of Colonel Nevin, General Wheaton 
then being in command of the Division. General Newton, 
the Division Commander, upon reaching the field was placed in 
command of the First Army Corps, its commander, General 
Reynolds, having been killed in the first day's fight. 

Early on the morning of the 3rd the brigade was ordered 
to the right, at Culp's Hill, to the support of Geary's Division 
of the Twelfth Corps, which was engaged in holding Ewells' 
Corps in check. The latter had taken possession of that part 
of the line late on the 2nd, while the Twelfth Corps were at 
Little Round Top, supporting Sickels' hard-pressed lines, the 
brigade taking up a position in a rocky ravine to the left of 
Spangler's Springs. Shortly afterwards an order came for the 
regiment to relieve the troops in the front line. Lieu- 
tenant Colonel John F. Glenn, in the absence of Colonel Ely, 
detailed the right wing for this duty, leaving the left wing 
under command of Major Wallace. The right wing moved 
into the slight breastworks, where they relieved a Maryland 
regiment of Lockwood's Brigade, a portion of the regiment 
crossing the works, taking a few prisoners — for awhile it was 

hotlv engaged. When the 
fire of the enemy having sub- 
sided somewhat, the com- 
manding officer desiring to 
ascertain the cause ordered a 
detail of two men from each 
company to advance beyond 
the works. They had not 
proceeded very far when the 
enemy opened a terrific lire, 
and were compelled to lie 
down for protection. They re- 
mained in this position until — 
it being demonstrated that the 
enemy was still in force — 
General Geary issued orders 
recalling them. The regiment 
was engaged with theenemv at short range, however, until 
the heavy cannonading just previous to Pickett's charge, 
when it retired about one hundred yards, having been re- 
lie\ ill by an < )hio regiment. 




|i pun DOUGHERTY, 

Co. E. Killed at Fair Oaks May ji, 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



95 



" Afterwards, it moved with the brigade to the support of 
the threatened position at the Left Center. Crossing the fields 
under a heavy artillery fire, the regiment took a position to the 
left of Meade's Headquarters, beyond the Taneytown road, just 
as the charge was repulsed and the prisoners were coming over 
the slope ; here it remained in support of the Third Corps, 
until moved about half mile further to the right, being held in 
rr-erve. The Twenty-third was continued in this capacity until 
6 A. M. of the 4th, when, by order of General Meade, it re- 




FIRE IN CAMP. 

joined the division, where it remained until the morning of the 
5th, when, with the Sixth Corps, the regiment joined in pursuit 
of Lee. The losses were two officers, Lieutenant Joshua S. 
Garsed, killed, and Lieutenant Edward B. Wilson, wounded, 
and twentv-nine enlisted men killed and wounded. 



Union, 
Confederate, 



LOSSES AT GETTYSBURG. 

Killed and Wounded. Missing. Total. 

17.556 5434 22,900 

15,298 4.150 20,448 



96 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



REPORTS OF BRIG. GEN. ALEXANDER SHALER, 

Commanding First Brigade, Third Division. 
Hdqrs. First Brigade, Third Division, Sixth Corps, 

July 27, 1863. 
Captain: — I have the honor herewith to submit the following re- 
port of the movements and operations of this brigade during the battle 
of Gettysburg : 

At 7 P. M. on the 2nd instant, by direction of Brigadier-General 
Wheaton, commanding the division, the brigade was formed in line of 
battle on the left of the position held by the army, in rear of the Second 
Brigade. 

At 8 A. M. of the 3rd instant, under instructions from General 
Wheaton, I reported with my brigade to Brigadier-General Geary, 

commanding Second Division, 
Twelfth Corps, which held the 
right of the position the army occu- 
pied, and by his direction took a 
sheltered position in rear of a piece 
of woods, beyond which the action 
was then progressing. Accom- 
panying this you will find a copy 
of a report made to General Geary 
of the operations of the brigade 
while under his command. 

At 3.30 o'clock, bv direction 
of General Wheaton, the brigade 
was moved under a terrific fire of 
artillery, to report to General New- 
ton. A subsequent order, however, 
from General Meade, directed me 
to remain in rear of the position of 
the Third Cor] is, reporting to Major-General Newton for instructions. 
At 7 A. M. the brigade was moved by direction of General New- 
ton about half a mile to the right, still in reserve, and remained in this 
position until 6 A. M. of the 4th instant, when the brigade rejoined 
the division, by an order received direct from General Mc.uk'. 

The regiments composing the brigade, without exception, ac- 
quitted themselves in a highly commendable manner. I append a 
revised list of casualties. 

I am, Captain, respectfully, your obedienl servant, 

All XANDER SHALER, 

Brigadier-! ieneral, Commanding Brigade. 




ii IRPORAL J( 11 IN E. LITTLE, 

Co. C. Killed at CoUl Harbor, June i, 1x1,4 



' Cai'i. A. J, Smith, 

Acting Asst. Adjt. < len. 



Third 1 >i\ ision, Sixth Corps. 



PENNSYLVANIA Y< >H 'NTKF.K INFANTRY. 



97 



Hdqrs. First Brigade, Third 



)ivision, Sixth Corps. 

November 2< i, 1 863. 




Sir: — My attention has been called to the report of the major- 
general commanding the army at the battle of Gettysburg, as published 
in the Washington Chronicle of the [3th instant, in which it is stated 
in substance that Wheaton's Brigade, of 
the Third Division, was sent to the assist- 
ance- of the Twelfth Corps. 

In justice to the officers and men of 
my command, whose good services were 
acknowledged on the ground by General 
( leary, and as appears by the accompany- 
ing nport. 1 beg to ask the major-general 
commanding the army, through the inter- 
mediate commanders, for a correction of 
the report in this particular. 

The First Brigade, and the First alone, 
was directed and did report to General 
Geary, commanding Second Division of 
the Twelfth Corps, on the morning of 
July 3, and went into action under my 
command by direction of General Geary. 

I enclose a copy of my report to the 
Assistant Adjutant-General of the Second Division, Twelfth Corps, 
and also a copy of the report to the Acting Assistant Adjutant-General 
of the Third Division, Sixth Corps, for the perusal of the major-general 
1 1 mimanding. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully yours, 

Alexander Shaler, 
Brig. -Gen. , Comdg. First Brig., Third Div. , Sixth Corps. 

Capt. A. F. King, 

Assistant Adjutant-General, Third Division. 

Endorsements.) 

Headquarters Third Division, Sixth Corps. 

November 2, 1863. 
Respectfully forwarded. Approved. 

H. D. Tekrv, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 



\\ Hi 1 WANTS IT. 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



Headquarters Sixth Corps. 

November 21, 1863. 
Respectfully f< irwarded. 

In my report of the operations at Gettysburg, it is stated that 
"Shaler's Brigade was also ordered first to the left and then to the 
right, and subsequently returned to the left center and held in re- 
serve;" and it appears also that Wheaton's Brigade remained in the 
position in which it was placed on the evening of July 2d, ;'. e., on 
the left center. 

The mistake in regard to the position of the two brigades may 






m 






|| 







1 , 'Z^W^-^% v' r ^ v " ¥M£f 




WOUNI>KI> ON SKIRMISH LINE. 



have originated in the report of the commanding officer of the Twelfth 
Corps. 

John Sedgwick, 
Major-General, Commanding Sixth Corps. 

Headquarters Army of the Potomac. 

November 23, 1 863. 
Respectfully forwarded, with the recommendation that the neces 
sary correction in my reporl oi the battle ol Gettysburg, which was 
based upon that of the corps commanders, !»• made. 

Geo. i '.. Mi vde, 
Major-* reneral, Commanding, 




PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 99 

[nclosure. 
Hdqrs. Third Brig., Third I>i\., Sixth Corps. 

July 2\ , 1863. 

Major: — I have the honor to hand you the following report oi the 
movements and operations of the several regiments of this brigade 
while under command of Brigadier- 
General Geary, during the action of the 

morning of July 3: 

At 9 A. M. the One Hundred and 
Twenty-second New York Volunteers, 
Col. Silas Titus commanding, was di- 
rected to relieve the One Hundred and 
Eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, then 
occupying a position in the front line. 

Finding the breastworks had been 
hastily vacated by the regiment, they 
were immediately re-occupied by the 
One Hundred and Twenty-second, and 
held by them, under a severe fire of the 
enemy, until relieved by the Eight}- peter born, 

second Pennsylvania Volunteers at Co - A - 

Killed at Cold Harbor June i, 1S64. 
i [.30 A. M. 

At 9. 20 A. M. the Twenty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, Lieut, 
Col. John F. Glenn commanding, was placed in position as support to, 
and 150 yards in rear of, the front line. After about three hours, five 
companies were, by direction of General Geary, reported to the lieu- 
tenant-colonel commanding a regiment of the Second Division, Twelfth 
Corps. 

These companies, being deployed in rear of the works, were, 
under a galling fire of musketry, advanced into them. Owing to the 
heavy fire immediately opened by the enemy, the design of feeling 
them with skirmishers was found impracticable. Skirmishers were 
advanced, however, about fifteen paces, but were shortly afterward 
withdrawn. 

At 1 1 A. M. the Sixty-seventh New York Volunteers, Col. Nelson 
Cross commanding, marched into the woods and forward to the breast- 
works, from which the enemy were then fleeing. They succeeded in 
capturing about 20 prisoners. 

At 11. 15 o'clock the Sixty-fifth New York Volunteers, Col. 
Joseph E. Hamblin commanding, occupied a position as support to 
the Twenty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, of this brigade. 

At 11.30 A. M. the Eighty-second Pennsylvania Volunteers, Col. 
E. C. Bassett commanding, advanced to the front line, relieving the 
One Hundred and Twenty-second New York, and occupying the 



*? fi C: 1 *r> * n 



100 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-T1 I1K1 > REGIMENT 



position until relieved by a portion of General Geary's command, at 
about 3 P. M. At this hour the brigade was reformed under my 
command. 

I annex a list of killed, wounded and missing during the engage- 
ments. 




I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Alexander Shaler, 
Brigadier-* ieneral, Commanding Brigade. 
Assistant Adjutanl I ieneral, 

Second I division, Twelfth Corps. 



I'l NNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER [NFANTRY. 



101 




General John W. Geary, commanding the Second Divi- 
sion, Twelfth Corps, in his report on Gettysburg, states, 
relative to Shaler's Brigade: * * "About 8 A. M. the 

enemy doubled their efforts, and, massing all the force against 
us that the ground would admit, 
pressed forward with an evident 
determination to carry the posi- 
tion at all hazards. Our entire 
line was hotly engaged, and, fear- 
ing that the overwhelming force 
might prove too much for us. 
General Slocum was solicited for 
reinforcements, and General 
Alexander Shaler's (First) Brig- 
ade, Third Division, Sixth Corps, 
reported at tt.45 o'clock, and was 
posted as a reserve. Ten min- 
utes before the arrival of this 
brigade, the Fourteenth Brooklyn 
and One Hundred and Forty- 
seventh New York Volunteers 
(both together about 1 50 strong) reported again from General 
Wadsworth's division, and were sent in to re-enforce Kane's 
Brigade, on the right. They were shortly afterwards relieved 
bv Candy's and Lockwood's troops. Instructions having been 
given me not to actively engage Shaler's brigade unless una- 
voidable, only a portion of it was employed briefly. Those 
engaged displayed the accustomed gallantry, which has en- 
rolled Shaler's brigade among the best veterans of the army. 

"At 9 A. M., the One Hundred and Twenty-second New 
York (Col. Silas Titus), of this brigade, relieved the One Hun- 
dred and Eleventh Pennsylvania, of Kane's which had 
been engaged in the front line all the morning, and whose 
ammunition was failing. The Eighty-second Pennsylvania, 
(Colonel Isaac S. Bassett), Shaler's Brigade, relieved the One 
Hundred and Twenty-second New York after our occupancy 
1 if the breastworks." 

" At 9.20 o'clock the Twenty-third Pennsylvania (Colonel 
John F. Glenn,) of the same brigade, was placed in support of 
the front line, about 150 yards to the rear, and subsequently 
five companies of it was deployed by my order in rear of the 



DAVID APPLEGATE, 

Corporal Co. G. 

Killed at Cold Harbor June I, 1864. 



102 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



works, and advanced into them. Toward the end of the en- 
gagement, a portion of them was pushed out a few paces as 
skirmishers, but the impracticability of feeling the enemy with 
skirmishers was demonstrated by their increased fire, and they 
were withdrawn." 

" The Sixty-fifth (Colonel Joseph E. Hamblin), the Sixy- 
seventh New York (Colonel Nelson Cross), and Eighty-second 
Pennsylvania, were placed well to the front, after the enemy had 
been driven back, to resist any renewed demonstration of hos- 
tility on the part of the enemy, while several already over- 
worked regiments of my division were allowed a much needed 
respite, for their energies, which had been so many hours, 
stretched to their utmost tension. They were not, however, 
called upon for further operations. 

"About 2 o'clock the brigade was ordered to rejoin the 
corps. While subject to my order, it behaved with admirable 
coolness, and manifested to an eminent degree the possession 
of the greatest attributes of the soldier, both during the brief 
period (as per orders) thev were actively engaged and while 

under heavy fire, as they 
awaited the moment they 
might be called upon. 

"Their casualties num- 
bered in the aggregate forty- 
five — eleven enlisted men 
1 icing killed. 

"Their brave and efficient 
commander, Brigadier ( ieneral 
Alexander Shaler is entitled to 
the warmest eulogies for his 
readiness to participate in any 
measure to provide for the 
emergencies besetting us." 

When it was discovered 
that Lee had retreated, the 
Sixth Corps, on the morning i >l 
the 5th, mi ived oul the road to 
the right of Little Round Top. When about five miles from 
Gettysburg, the Corps struck Lee's rear guard, on the Cham- 
bersburg Pike, skirmishing with him to Fairfield. During the 
nigh( the regimenl was on picket, capturing eighty-five prison 








WILLIAM GRAHAM, 

I Hi d "i v Is received al I old 

I [arbor J une, i B64 



PENNSYLVANIA V< (LUNTEER INFANTRY. 



L03 




Co. G 



JOHN WILSON, 

Killed at Cold Harbor June i. 1S64. 



ers. Abandoning the direct line of pursuit, the Corps moved to 
the left, through Emmettsburg, and attempted to cross the 
mountains with artillery to Middletown ; but, the road being a 
very difficult one, the night dark, and the rain descending in tor- 
rents, the guns were soon fasl 
in the mud, and had to be taken 
apart before they could be got 
back on the main road through 
Frederick. A fragment of the 
Corps reached the Summit at 
midnight, while the greater pi >r- 
tion were either resting on tin- 
road or lost on the march up. 
At daylight of the 9th, the 
regiment was moved to the sup- 
port of the cavalry and placed 
on the skirmish line. Loss, two 
men wounded. On the iothand 
1 ith, they had a severe skirmish 
with the enemy at Funkstown 
— loss, several men wounded. 
On the 1 2th, it was ascertained that the enemy had fallen back, 
during the previous night, to a strongly entrenched position 
on the heights about Williamsport. Our lines were formed at 
1 nice in front of it, with orders to build breastworks and to be in 
readiness to assault the enemy's breastworks at daylight. The 
order for attack, however, was countermanded and the troops 
remained inactive all of that day. During the night Lee re- 
crossed the Potomac. 

Upon an examination of the works which he abandoned 
they were found to have been equally as strong as his entrench- 
ments at Mine Run or Cold Harbor. The Twenty-third then 
marched back to Berlin, where it was supplied with clothing. 

On the 19th, the Corps proceeded to Manassas Gap, sup- 
porting the Third and Fifth Corps in their passage through 
that gap. From here it moved to Chester Gap, thence to 
Warrenton, where it laid out camp, decorating the grounds in 
an elaborate and tasteful manner, with the view of permanent 
quarters. On August 15th, with other troops of the Corps, 
the regiment was sent to the mouth of the North Fork of the 
Rappahannock, on a reconnoissance ; five companies were left 



KM 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 




KIIWARD F. EISEXBAKTH, 
Co. K. Killed at Cold Harbor. 



at the cross-roads of the Orleans and Waterloo Pike, the other 
portion of the regiment guarding the fords and bridges of the 
river. On the 17th it was relieved and returned to its old 
camp, where it was joined by Major Wallace, with one hundred 

and fifty-six drafted men from 
Philadelphia. The majority of 
these men were of little ser- 
vice, as they were substitutes 
for men who had been drafted — 
in fact, were bounty-jumpers, 
nearly all deserting within a few 
weeks. Those who remained 
became good soldiers, several 
being killed or wounded. 

Shortly afterwards, the 
brigade was detached from the 
Third Division and assigned 
to the Second Division under 
General Howell. September 
4th, the officers of the regiment 
gave a reception to the brig- 
ade officers, at which General Birney, of the Third Corps ; 
General Terry, Division Commander ; Generals Wheaton and 
Shaler, with their staffs, were guests, and as were all of the 
affairs of the Twenty-third, it was "hunkey-dorey." 

During the dog days, division drills came every day and 
inspection on Sundays ; sunstroke was not uncommon, it being 
necessary to establish hospitals on the drill grounds. While 
al Warrenton many men of the regiment were detailed as 
safety guards and enjoyed the hospitality of the sympathizing 
Confederate residents, as all their able-bodied men were in 
the Confederate Army, either with Lee or Mosby. While here 
the boys were careful to keep within the lines, because if cap 
tured, they would be sure to go to Richmond, as strong bands 
of Confederate cavalry were constantly hovering about. Some 
iii the men became careless, nevertheless, and a lew were cap- 
tured, one of the latter belonging to the Signal Corps of the 
Divisiun. 

September i6th the regiment broke camp and moved to 
the vicinity of Culpepper. Alongwith the rest 1 if the brigade 
it was paraded at headquarters to witness the execution of one 



a — 
ft — 



V. — 



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c' 

"i X 

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5' - 

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5. C 
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105 



106 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTV-THIRI > REGIMENT 




of the men of the One Hundred and Twenty-second New York, 
who had been sentenced to be shot for desertion. When every- 
thing was ready for the execution, Adjutant Boggs stepped to 
the front of the line and read a pardon from President Lincoln. 

Everybody seemed satisfied 
at this termination, and " Old 
Abe " was commended for his 
kindness of heart. 

October ist the Twenty- 
third moved with the Sixth 
Corps to Catletts' Station ; 
here it remained on fatigue 
and picket duty until the 1 2th, 
when all the rolling stock of 
the road, with government 
stores, arrived at Warrenton 
Junction, and Captain Rees, 
with four companies, was 
detailed to guard them. Late 
the same evening it was 
rumored that the enemy was 
advancing, and the Twenty-third and one company of the 
Thirteenth Pennsylvania Cavalrv was sent to re-enforce the 
guard. During the night General Shaler arrived with the 
balance of the brigade, and at daylight the rest of the 
corps arrived and the stores were safe. On the 15th the 
brigade marched to Centreville, where they were formed in 
line of battle, while the Second Corps was in action at Bristow 
Station. At 3 A. M. the regiment marched to Chantilly, where 
it again formed line of battle, but the rebel commander did not 
seem desirious of a conflict and began to retire. 

The Sixth Corps then continued its forward movement, 
and, after considerable skirmishing, reached Warrenton on 
the j 1 si, going into Camp in its old quarters. 

( )n November 7th they marched to Rappahannock Station, 
where the brigade drove the enemy's skirmishers back to their 
line of works, which consisted of a redoubt with four pieces ol 
artillery and entrenchments right and left, covering a pontoon 
bridge, with the Brigades of 1 hikes and I laves holding the pos 
ili'tn The assaulting parly consisted of the Fifth Wisconsin, 
Sixth Maine, Forty-ninth and One hundred and Nineteenth 



I'RKDKKICK HCBEK. 

ist Sergt. Co. F. 

Killed Fair Oaks, May 31, 1S62. 



M\\s\i\ \\|.\ VOLUNTEER IMAM in 



IH7 



Pennsylvania and One Hundred and Twenty-first New York. 
These troops were commanded by General David A. Russell, 
Colonel I '.II maker the brigade, and ( xeneral Upton, the assault- 
ing column numbering thirteen hundred muskets. The move- 
ment resulted in the capture nl the entire position, including 
1600 prisoners, 130 commissioned officers, eight battle Hags, 
tour pieces of artillery and destruction of the pontoon bridge. 



The following congratulatory letter from General Sedg- 
wick, Commander of the Sixth Corps, was read to the Corps : 

" Headquarters of the Right Column, 

November 8th, 1S63. 
( ieneral < ) ruler X< >. 1 . 

The General commanding the right column, congratulates the 

troops of his command on the admirable success which attended the 
operations of yesterday. The enemy was attacked in an entrenched 
position of great strength, in enclosed works defended by artillery and 
infantry, and compelled to surrender, after a sharp conflict, to an 
assaulting column actually inferior in numbers to the forces defending 
the works. Four pieces of artillery, four caissons filled with ammuni- 
tion, the enemy's pontoon bridge, 
eight battle-flags, 2000 stands of 
small arms, 1600 prisoners, includ- 
ing 130 commissioned officers, are 
the fruits of the victory. 

The prompt advance of the 
Fifth Corps to the river from the 
right of its line, simultaneously 
with the troops of the Sixth Corps, 
are worthy of high praise. 

The taking of the heights on 
the right by Neill and Shaler's 
brigades of the Sixth Corps under 
General Howe — to obtain position 
for the batteries — was admirably 
accomplished. 

The assault of the storming 
party, under General Russell, con- 
ducted over rough open -round in full tire of the works, could not be 
surpassed in steadiness and gallantry. 

The brigades of Colonel Ellmaker and Colonel Upton, and the 
tl -oops of the Sixth Corp-,, which participated in the assault, have 




JOSHUA S. GARSED, 
Lieut. Co. B. Killed ai Gettysburg, Julj 



ins 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



nobly earned the admiration and gratitude of their commander and 
commanders. 

The Sixth Maine and Fifth Wisconsin Volunteers, for carrying the 
redoubts ; One Hundred and Twenty-first New York, Fifth Maine, 
Forty-ninth and One Hundred and Nineteenth Pennsylvania Volunteers, 
for taking the line of rifle pits with the bayonet and seizing the 
enemy's bridge, deserve special honor. 

By command of Major-General Sedgwick, 

M. T. McMAHON. 
Chief of Staff and Asst. Adj. -General." 



The next day the regiment was detailed with the Thirtv- 
seventh Massachusetts, Second Rhode Island and Sixty-fifth 
New York, under the command of General Eustis, and 
marched to Kelly's Ford and crossed the river, and assisted 
in destroying the rebel fortifications. One of the forts 
had a checkered history. It was first built by the troops 
under General Pope and faced to the south. When Lee ap- 
proached the right bank of the river it changed its face to the 
north. Upon Meade's advance to Culpepper about face was 
the order, and it again looked to the south. As Lee advanced 

on the retreat of the Army of 
the Potomac to Centerville it 
was elaborately reconstructed 
and was made to again face to 
the north. Now for the fifth 
time the boys were hard at work 
putting it in shape to again face 
the advancing column. On the 
13th the regiment was relieved 
by the 10th Massachusetts, im- 
mediately afterward rejoining 
the brigade in camp near 
Brandy Staiii >n, remaining until 
the -7th, when the Mine Run 
campaign commenced. After 
crossing the Rapidan at Ger 

mania Ford, a hall mile from 
the river, it formed in line where General French's troops hail 
been engaged. I he next day it marched to Robinson's 
Tavern, and moved to the support of the hirst and Second 




M \Ji IR \VM. CLARK. 
< !apt. Co E, 23rd P. \ and Majoi - ''I P. V. 



PENNSYLVANIA V( tLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



li in 



Divisions of the Sixth Corps, charging the enemy at Chancel- 
lorsville Pike and driving them hack to their works at Mine Run. 
On Sunday morning, the 29th, the Twenty-third was 
ordered to the support of Gregg's Cavalry, and on the 30th it 
was assigned to the extreme left of the line with orders to 
prepare for a charge of the enemy's works. The charge was 
never made, as General Warren, then Chief of Staff of Meade's 
Army, reported the works impregnable and the assault was 
abandoned. While lying here, we discerned in our front, what 
at first appeared to be several ambulances, but which subse- 
quently proved to be a masked battery, when suddenly they 
threw off the tarpaulin covers and opened a terrific fire on our 
lines, killing and wounding seven of the Twenty-third. 

Lving exposed to the cold and without fires, on the night of 
December 1st the whole army fell back, our regiment passing 
through Chancellorsville, the Gold Mines, and crossing at Ger- 
mania Ford, finally reaching its old camp ; loss, 1 killed and 7 
wounded. 

On December 6th Colonel Ely resigned on account of 
wounds and sickness, and was succeeded as Colonel by Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel John F. Glenn. 
Major William J. Wallace was 
promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel 
and Captain Henry Reese to 
Major. 

The friends of the Twenty- 
third in Philadelphia gave a 
ball at Sansom Street Hall for 
the benefit of the regiment. 
With the proceeds was pur- 
chased six hundred pairs of 
woolen gloves, and a new stand 
of colors containing a list of the 
battles in which the regiment 
participated inscribed thereon, 
all being received by the regi- 
ment while in the field. A short 
time previously the ladies of Bucks County, friends of Col- 
onel Ely, sent the enlisted men ear comforters, so that the boys 
were fairly protected, through the kindess of friends, from the 
chillv blasts of the severe winter. 




AMES TATE. 
Drummer. Co. E. 



110 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 




While in camp at this place one hundred medals were 
struck off by Colonel Ely for such of the enlisted men as were 
designated by the company officers as most deserving of 
merit for gallantry in the charge at Marye's Heights. The 

distribution of these medals 
caused considerable dissatis- 
faction throughout the regiment. 
On December 30th two 
hundred of the command re- 
enlisted as veteran volunteers, 
and proceeded to Philadelphia 
under command of Colonel 
Glenn, on veteran furlough, the 
balance of the regiment remain- 
ing in camp at Brandy Station, 
under Lieut.-Colonel Wallace, 
the camp being situated on a 
hill to the right of the sta- 
tion near Meade's headquarters. 
Here winter quarters were es- 
tablished, many of the men build- 
ing elegant log houses, which contained all the comforts pos- 
sible. The usual winter work of picket duty, diversified with 
occasional expeditions in search of Mosby's men in that 
locality, constituted our duties, until January 6th when, 
with the brigade, the regiment was ordered to intercept a 
movement of the Confederates threatening Washington, this 
turned out to be false, and while lying in the streets of Wash- 
ington enjoying a snow storm waiting orders, the brigade 
was ordered to Johnson's Island, Sandusky Bay, in Lake 
Erie, opposite Sandusky, Ohio, to guard rebel prisoners; 
it being rumored at the time that rebel sympathizers were 
organizing in Canada to cross the ice and liberate the 
4200 officers confined there ; the object of this move, as 
stated, being to send these officers to the West where they 
were to gather about them those who were in sympathy 
with the Confederate cause, perfect them in the tactics, and 
afterward seize arsenals and stores, destroy bridges and in 
every way assisl the Confederate Government. At this time the 
prison was guarded by "Home Guards" and "one hundred 

days' men." The winter had been so severe that the bay 



JAMES HENRY, 
Co. F. 



1'hNNSYIA ANIA VolANTKKk INFANTRY 



111 



\\;i> Frozen from shore to shore, and the Island could readily be 
reached by that means. The arrival of the brigade prevented 
the consummation of this contemplated movement. The regi- 
ment started for Johnson's Island from the front over the Balti- 
more & Ohio Railroad in cattle cars — the kind in use in those 
days — in mid-winter. Nevertheless, the boys enjoyed this 
detail because it was considered " a snap" — comfortable quar- 
ters, plenty of rations, camp fires every night in the barracks 
and passes when off duty to visit Sandusky, which was a 
very interesting city. 

< >ne of the pleasant diversions while on this detail was a 
ball given by the officers — at which, by the way, someone was 
unkind enough to liberally sprinkle the floor with snuff — 
causing consternation for a time. If the sprinkler had been 
found, it would have been hard to have saved him from going 
to the Dry Tortugas. 

The "Johnnies" seemed to appreciate and enjoy the 
change of custodians, having tired of the " Home Guards," 
because, when they caught sight of the Greek Cross as the 
right of our brigade neared the stockade, up went the rebel yell 
in greeting. Thus the change, 
so far as our brigade and the 
prisoners were concerned, was 
agreeable to Johnnie and Yank. 

The "pleasantness" of this 
tour of dutv was not, however, 
monopolized by the enlisted 
men, for on occasions of special 
exchange the officers of our 
brigade were all anxious to be 
detailed to accompany the Con- 
federates to the destination 
named in the order. Officers 
and men alike were fully aware 
that this condition could not 
last, as when the campaign 
opened, back to the front we 
would go, and all were disposed to enjoy the opportunity of 
this snap to the fullest extent. On Februarv nth. Colonel 
Glenn, accompanied by the veterans whose furloughs had 
expired and a number of new recruits rejoined the regiment. 




Wll 1. 1AM EVERHARD 
Co. C 



Ill' 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



When the campaign opened in the spring General Shaler, 
with the Sixty-fifth, Sixty-seventh and One Hundred and 
Twenty-second New York, left for the front and arrived in time 
to participate in the opening of the Wilderness campaign, 

where the General was cap- 
tured in trying to hold the ex- 
treme right flank with his little 
skeleton command. This was 
the end of his term of service 
with his old brigade. He was 
held prisoner of war a long 
time, and was one of the offi- 
cers placed under the fire of our 
guns at Charleston. When re- 
leased he was assigned to the 
command of the ist Division, 
7th Corps, at DuVall's Bluff, 
Arkansas, being made Brevet 
Major-General for long and 
faithful services. Here he re- 
mained until the close of the 
war. General Shaler was a strict disciplinarian, a good soldier, 
and was well liked, both by officers and men. 

On May 9th the Twenty-third and Eighty-second Penn- 
sylvania were relieved from duty at the prison camp and 
ordered to the front, the Wilderness campaign having 
opened. Arriving at Belle Plain, where several thousand 
prist mers from the recent actions were gathered we found the 1 >ld 
brigade commander, General Abercrombie, in command of the 
post. Colonel Isaac C. Bassett, of the Eighty-sea >nd, was placed 
in command of both regiments, while Colonel Glenn was made 
Commissary of Prisoners. After shipping the latter to Fort 
Delaware, Point Lookout, etc., the regiment marched to 
Fredericksburg, and was detailed to guard a wagon train of 
five hundred wagons destined for the front. 




J. \(i )1! H. YOCUM, 
Co. G. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 113 

1 [eadquarters Sixth Corps. 

May i Mh, [864. 
Brigadier General S. W11.1 tAMS, 

Assistant Adjutant General. 

Geni ral : — Understanding that two regiments of this corps, the 
Eighty-second and Twenty-third Pennsylvania, recently returned From 
dutj al Sandusky, ( Ihio, are retained Eor guard duty at Belle Plain, I 
respectfully request that they may be ordered at once to the corps. 
I would respectfully suggest that it would be for the interest of the ser- 
vice to assign new regiments to depot duty and send the veteran regi- 
ment-- tn the front. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

H. G. WRIGHT, 
M.iji >]•-( General, Commanding. 



Headquarters. 

Belle Plain, Va., May rg, [864. 
Brig.-< ini. J. A. Rawlins, 

Chief of Staff. 
General : — The Twenty-third and Eighty-second Pennsylvania 
Volunteers, arrived at this post just as we were in receipt of over 7500 
prisoners. It was indispensably necessary that the provost guard, 
Army of the Potomac, who brought them, should be relieved and 
sent to the front. The two Pennsylvania regiments ( which had been on 
duty at Johnson's Island over prisoners) were substituted in the 
emergency. The last of the rebels left here yesterday, and the 
Twenty-third and Eighty-second have been ordered forward. 
By order of Brigadier-General J. J. Abercrombie. 
I am, General, etc. , 

R. L. ORR, 
Captain and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General. 



14 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



After delivering the train safely at Bowling Green, they 
passed through Milford Station and crossed the North Anna 
river, joining their former associates who had become the Fourth 
Brigade (Colonel Nelson Cross), First Division (General David 
A. Russell), Sixth Corps, (General H. G. Wright), the old Third 
Division having been broken up during their absence and the 
troops from the Valley, under General Ricketts were consti- 
tuted the Third Division, while those of the former Third were 
distributed between the First and Second Divisions. 

On the 24th the regiment moved to the right and front, 
along the Virginia Central Railroad, which it assisted in de- 
stroving. The division having been detached from the Corps, 

the Twenty-third recrossed the 
North Anna at Jericho Bridge, 
escorting the wagon train to 
Chesterfield station. After a 
forced march by night to Ham- 
ilton, they crossed the Pam- 
unkey river about noon on the 
27th, where they joined Sher- 
idan's cavalry. In this vicinity 
was a village of the Pamunkey 
Indians, the male members of 
which were used by both sides 
as guides through the slash- 
ings. In this part of the coun- 
trv, beyond the Wilderness, 
was a splendid agricultural 
district, dotted here and there 
On the 28th they moved for- 




ALEX POWELL, 

1st Sergt., Co. F. 



with old colonial mansions 
ward about three miles and were stationed in the rear of the 
front line as reserves. On the 29th, they started with the divi- 
sion on a reconnoissance to Hanover Court House. Theregi- 
ment being on the skirmish line, remained out all night, 
entrenching as they marched, loosing several men wounded. 
( )n the night of the 31st, they started for Cold Harbor, where 
they arrived about noon of June 1st. The regiment was formed 
on the left of the Richmond and Gaines' Mills cross-roads. 
The Twenty-third was selected to storm the enemy's works in 
front, with the Eighty-second Pennsylvania supporting it, and, 
alter diiving the enemy's skirmishers through a strip oi woods 



PENNSYLVANIA Yc >l.l"N TKHK INI- WIRY 



115 



— which they set fire to as they fell back — the line emerged 
into the open field. About 500 yards away, on a little hill, 
were the enemy's works. Preparations were at once made for 
the final charge, the Ninety-fifth Pennsylvania being on the 
ritjlit, but the left of the regiment was unprotected by either 
infantry or artillery. About 5 P. M. orders to advance were 
given and as soon as they were communicated, the line swept 
forward on the double quick, confronting a severe artillery 
and infantry fire. Dashing forward on the run, however, the 
thin line crossed the enemy's works, the left of the line being 
subjected to a flanking fire of grape and canister, but having 
only a handful of men, they were soon driven out. The 
Eighty-second, however, came 
up bravely to its support, but 
after fighting for twenty-five 
minutes without reinforcements, 
they were obliged to retire. 
With spoons, knives and bayo- 
nets in lieu of spades and picks, 
the troops erected temporarv 
breastworks about five hundred 
yards from the enemy's line. 
Aided by the balance of the 
Sixth Corps, which advanced 
along the right, and by the Sec- 
ond Corps, which came up on 
the left, by dint of hard fight- 
ing the position was held and 
more firmly entrenched. Here 
the regiment remained until relieved. The Sixth Corps main- 
tained this line during the entire twelve days that the posi- 
tion was assailed. 

During the charge across the open field, under the terrific 
artillery and infantry fire of the enemy, and the close fighting 
before the enemy's works, without reenforcements, the regi- 
ment lost eight officers and one hundred and eighty-one enlisted 
men, killed and wounded, and five men captured. Captain 
Henry Marchant, Lieutenants James Johnson, John Bovd and 
James G. Williamson and seventy men were killed, and 
Captain James M. Craig, Lieutenants Richard A. Griffiths, 




LEWIS J. SPEAKMAN. 
Co. A. 



116 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 




|( i|I\ R. JOHNS li IN, 
Lieutenant Co. C. 



Frank Taylor and Frank A. Lynch and one hundred and 
twentv men were wounded. 

While the army lay here for twelve days in the entrenched 
lines, the men had to hug the works, as the fire was close and 

active. On the 3d, Lt -Col. 
Wallace and ten men were 
wounded, and three were killed. 
That evening one company 
was detailed to advance about 
ten yards and dig rifle pits ; 
this was done under a severe 
fire, the company successfully 
throwing up a safe cover where 
the)' remained until the morn- 
ing of the 5th, when relieved. 

At three o'clock that morn- 
ing the regiment was recalled 
from the frontline and ordered 
to a position on the second 
line, being continually under a 
brisk fire until 8. P. M., when 
ordered back to the third line, where the men, for the first time 
in five davs, had a chance to cook supper and get a good 
night's rest. On the 7th the Twenty-third was detailed to dig 
a covered way to the front, and on the 8th it again went into 
the trenches on the front line, where it remained under a heavy 
fire until the night of the 9th, when sent back to the second 
line. On the night of the 12th, the attempt to break through 
the enemy's line having been abandoned, the army withdrew. 
The loss in the trenches was 20 killed and wounded. Losses 
at Cold Harbor — Union, killed, wounded and missing, 10,088. 
Confederates' loss unknown, probably 5,000. 

Marching and counter-marching, holding line oi battle by 
day and entrenching by night, the regiment finally reached the 
James River. On the 16th, halting on the farm of ex-Presidenl 
Tyler, they embarked on the Transport "Cauliflower" for Ber- 
muda Hundred, and immediately proceeded to the right of 
Gen. Butler's Headquarters, and were immediately ordered to 
the battle line. Crossing the Appomattox on the 19th, the 
regimenl was marched and funned in front oi Petersburg 
under a heavy artillery lire. 



PENNSYLVANIA Y< ILUNTEER INFANTRY 



in 



Tliis old Virginia town was destined to remain under siege 
From then until its fall, on April 2, 1865. A line of old breast- 
works that the British had thrown up during the Revolutionary 
War was found ; above the mouth of the Appomattox was 
once the home of Powhattan. This we did not get a chance to 
see, as "Johnny Reb " blocked the way. In the afternoon an 
attempt was made to advance the lines in the face of a severe 
fire ; loss, fifteen men wounded. The regiment next went on 
the skirmish line, right resting on the Appomattox, where it 
remained until the night of the 20th. Loss, one killed and 
seven wounded. 

On the 2 1st the Sixth Corps was relieved bv the Eigh- 
teenth Corps and moved to the extreme left of the line, about 
four miles southeast of Petersburg, where it formed on the left 
of the Second Corps, advancing about four hundred yards in 
the face of a hard skirmishing fire. They halted and threw up 
breastw t irks, and on the next day pushed through the woods and 
thick underbush, meeting with strong resistance. Again they 
threw up breastworks, front and rear, making the position secure. 

On the 29th the regiment marched out the Jerusalem 
Plank Road and was placed 
on picket near Reams' Station, 
on the YYeklon Railroad. The 
next dav they drove in the 
enemy's skirmishers through 
the woods, returning to their 
place in the brigade, the Third 
Brigade, First Division, Col- 
onel Oliver Edwards, com- 
manding, and were employed 
on July 1st in destroying the 
railroad and throwing up 
breastworks. On the 2nd they 
left bivouac, on the Jerusalem 
Plank Road, and returned 
with the brigade to their old 
position on the left of the 
armv, in front of Petersburg. Loss, thirteen men wounded. 
These advances by the left were giving Lee considerable trouble 
and anxietv, and to divert attention from that direction, and, if 
possible, compel Grant to relinquish his hold along the lines 




GEORGE P. MITCHELL, 
Sergt. Co. D. and Lieut. 82d P. V. 



118 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



at Petersburg and Richmond and change the campaign nearer 
to the front at Washington, General Jubal Early's Corps was 
detached from Lee's Army, and, with additional troops and 
cavalry under Rosser, threatened the Capitol at Washington. 
This had been the tactics of the commander of the Army of 
Northern Virginia in 1862, and again in 1863, having for its 
object the two-fold purpose of gathering the rich harvest in 
the Shenandoah Valley and the withdrawal of the Army of the 
Potomac from in front of Richmond to the vicinity of Washing- 
ton. This resulted in 1862 in the Battles of South Mountain and 
Antietam, and in 1 863 in that of Gettysburg ; but General Grant 
was now in command of the army, and the authorities at Wash- 
ington would not allow him to 
be interfered with, so when he 
learned from his scouts that 
the movement down the valley 
which threatened Washington 
and the invasion of the North 
was by Early's Corps, he de- 
tached the Sixth Corps, now 
under General Horatio G. Wright 
— its old commander, General 
John Sedgwick, having been 
killed in the Wilderness — to meet 
the threatened attack. The regi- 
ment marched with the corps to 
City Point, taking the transport 
" Eastern States." After a pleas- 
ant sail down the James, passing 
many of the old colonial estates, up the Chesapeake Hay, and 
thence along the Potomac to Washington, the troops disem- 
barked at the Arsenal wharf about noon of July 12th, and 
marched immediately to Fort Stevens. The corps arrived just 
in the nick of time. 

The Third Division, under General Ricketts, which had 
preceded the other two divisions of the corps, arrived in Haiti- 
more a few days before, and, embarking on cars, was run oul 
to the Monocacy, where, with troops under General Lew Wal- 
lace, in all numbering 8000 men, they held General Jubal 
Early up for a day by a most determined resistance, thus giving 
an opportunity for the other divisions oi the corps to reach 




LIEUT.-COL. CHARLES WII.IIKLM. 



II NNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



II!) 



Washington before Early arrived there. This determined 
action of General Wallace no doubt was the means of so 
crippling Early that he was unable to reach the vicinity of 
Washington before the arrival of troops destined for its 

defence. 

The Second Division, in command of General George 
W. Getty; the First Brigade, General Frank Wheaton, and 
the Third Brigade, Colonel Daniel I). Bidwell, disembarked at 
Washington at noon of the nth, and was marching under 
instructions out Pennsylvania avenue in the direction of the 
Chain Bridge when they were met by Colonel Tavlor, Chief i if 
Staff, Department of Washington, with the information that 
the enemy was driving in our 
picket line and seriously threat- 
ening Fort Stevens, on the 
Seventh Street Road. The 
march was directed up 
Eleventh street to Fort Stev- 
ens, meeting en route General 
H. G. Wright, the corps com- 
mander, who gave verbal in- 
structions to mass the column 
near Crystal Springs, where 
they arrived at 4 P. M. One 
hour afterwards the forces out- 
side of Fort Stevens, con- 
sisting of the Veteran Reserve 
( 1 irps.War Department Clerks 
and citizen volunteers were 
driven in toward the fort by 

a portion of Early's forces. The Ninety-eighth, One Hundred 
and Second and One Hundred and Thirty-ninth Pennsylvania 
were deployed as skirmishers, and soon drove the enemy back 
to his main line. Skirmishing continued during the night and 
the following day. The next day, July 12th, the First and 
Second Divisions of the corps arrived on the field, and about 
6 P. M. the lines were charged by the First and Third Brigades 
of the Second Division — under command of General Wheaton 
during the temporary absence of General Getty — composed of 
the Ninety-eighth, the One Hundred and Second, the Ninety- 
third, Sixty-first Pennsylvania; the Seventh Maine; the Forty- 




WM. R. LITTLE, 
Sergeant Co. C 



L20 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 




third, Forty-ninth, Sixty-second, Seventy-seventh, and One 
Hundred and Twenty-second New York, and some eighty of 
the Vermont Brigade on the skirmish line. Early was driven 
from his advanced position on two strong wooded hills, which 

our troops occupied during the 
night. The dawn of the next 
morning revealed the fact that 
he had fallen back. Thus ended 
the attempt to capture Wash- 
ington, and Early started on his 
way back home. Prior to this 
charge the Twenty-third, with 
the balance of the brigade, upon 
arriving at the front, was de- 
tailed, with the Thirty-seventh 
Massachusetts, to support the 
skirmish line engaging Early. 
During this short campaign 
they were again following the 
roads they had tramped over in 
the beginning of our service, 
in 1S61, but were not afforded a chance to visit any of the old 
camps or the forts for the construction of which they were prom- 
ised twenty-five cents additional per day. This extra remune- 
ration, however, failed to materialize. On the march along 
Four and a Half and Seventh streets, the citizens heartily 
cheered the troops, feeling very much rejoiced that the 
Sixth Corps had arrived, and many expressed themselves as 
assured that Washington was sale. While the people were 
cheering on the troops, the flankers were kept busy taking in 
all kinds of forage. The corps followed Early without any 
decided results, our brigade being rearguard to the wagon 
trains. Our regiment camped at Offut's Cross Roads ; passing 
through Poolsville, they forded the Potomac at White's Ford, 
and, after a skirmish, were ordered on the picket line a few 
miles from Leesburg, where they remained until the 8th, rejoin- 
ing the division at Clark's Gap, from whence they crossed the 
mountains, via Snicker's Gap, taking position near the Shenan- 
doah River, where they found the enemy encamped on the op- 
posite banks. The Twent v-third was on picket with the 
brigade from the iXth to the 20th, when, with the corps, it 



JOHN' BARCLAY FASSITT, 
I laptain Co. F. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



121 



Forded the Shenandoah River, and pushed out to the Win- 

i hotel' Pike, near Berryville. Loss was several men 
« ounded. 

At this juncture the corps was ordered back to the lines 
at Petersburg', under the supposition that Early was trying to 
rejoin Lee at Richmond. The return to Washington began on 
the 20th, and on the 21st they camped at Goose Creek, then 
proceeded through Peach Grove and Drainsville, recrossing 
the Potomac at Chain Bridge, bivouacking nearTennlytown, in 
the rear of Fort Gaines, and awaited transports to Petersburg. 
Notwithstanding the fact that the "Johnnies" failed to capture 
Washington, the Sixth Corps literally performed that service 
when the boys were paid off, causing the provost guard to 
\\-( irk overtime that night. Next day, orders were issued to 
change headquarters to Rockville, so the Corps was marched 
away from the eitv. 

General Early, who remained in the Yallev, soon turned 
upon General Crook, who had been left in command of a 
small force, and drove him precipitately into Maryland, and the 
Sixth Corps was immediately ordered again to push forward 
and meet Early. On the 28th 
the regiment passing through 
Rockville, Hyattstown, and Jef- 
ferson, forded the Monocacy 
and arrived at Harpers Ferry 
on the 29th, the same day upon 
which the rebel cavalry under 
General McCausland destroyed 
Chambersburg. Here the forces 
under Crook and Hunter, who 
had been driven over the moun- 
tains by a long detour, were 
joined together. The regiment 
crossed the Potomac on the pon- 
toon bridge and marched to 




SEPH H WHITE 

Sergeant Co. C 



Halltown ; and on the following 

day they recrossed the river and 

proceeded to Petersville, continuing the march to Frederick, 

memorable as the place where tradition and Boker's poem 

located " Barbara Fritchie," who, when Stonewall Jackson's 

troops marched through the town on the Antietam Campaign, 



- 



THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 




- redited with waving- the American flag iY"m out her win- 
v. and defying the rebel- - : her. 
Dunn. - Iy campaign the corps had marched . 
mil ~-henandoah Valley several of the men 

volunteered and were detached 
and assigned to what was 
known as Blasers Scouts, and 
• - rds --ported 
ing very proficient in that 
line of work. 

On August 7th the Twenty- 
third, with the civision again 
rossed I tomac. passing 

through Halltown. Berryville 
and Winchester. The posses- 
. and control of this latter 
n alternated sixty-two times 
between the North and South 
during the progress of the war. 
- -ral sharp engagerr. - 
being fought within its streets and surroundings ; it was a 
colonial settlement on the National Pike — one of the stopping 
places in the earlv davs of the country for travellers coming 
uth : being originally settled by the Scotch and 
Quakers from Pennsylvania. 

Ge - -v.eridan was now in command of the troops in 
the Shenandoah Valley, and soon was to be fought the last 
test at Winchester — - nown as the battle of Ope- 

quan. This engagement finally eliminated the Confeder 
m the quaint 
T: v-third took up the ; : march through 

Ke- Middletown and Cedar Creek, at which latter p! 

it remained until the 17th. in the meantime skirmishing with 
the »r throwing up bre: On that date another 

-ment beg-an. which continued until they reached 
Chariest n, memorable as the place in which John Brown 

■ttempt to 
prior to the outbreak of the Civil u 

At- 5 1 the picket lim and driven in 

Iy th<- lii 
and th< maintained. While in 1: 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



123 



the Eighth Corps, between Halltownand Harper's Ferry, the 
regiment was relieved from the front and marched to Bolivar, 
their term of service having expired. The men were drawn up in 
two columns, one composing those whose term of service had 
expired, and the other, the veterans and recruits who were to 
complete their enlistments. After a farewell speech by Colonel 
Glenn and good-byes from their comrades with whom thev had 
tramped the roads for three years, and with an exchange of hear- 
ty cheers, they embarked on the cars for home. Subsequently 
the veterans and recruits were consolidated into three companies 
and attached to the One Hundred and Nineteenth Pennsyl- 
vania as a battalion, under the command of Major William 
Clark, with which command they remained until September S, 
when consolidated with the Eighty-second Pennsylvania attach- 
ed to our old brigade, continuing in this capacitv until Appo- 
mattox, previous to which they participated in the action at 
Opequan (or Winchester), September 19, 1S64 ; Dabney's 
Mills, Fort Fisher, near Petersburg; the breaking of the lines at 
Petersburg on April 2, 1865, 
Sailors' Creek and Appomattox 
Court House. 

After the surrender of Lee 
they were detailed with the Sixth 
Corps to Danville, to help do up 
Johnson. General Sherman had, 
m e a n w h i 1 e, performed this 
service, and by easy stages were 
marched to Washington, too 
late, however, to take part in the 
grand review. Nevertheless, the 
Sixth Corps had a review to 
themselves, and was hnallv 
mustered out July 13, 1865. 

Being ordered home for 
muster out the regiment pro- 
ceeded to Philadelphia, and on 
its arrival was met at Broad and Prime streets (now Washing- 
ton avenue) by a committee and escorted to the Cooper Shop 
Refreshment Rooms, Prime street (now Washington avenue) 
and Otsego streets, an institution supported by voluntary 
contributions of the citizens of Philadelphia, who cared for all 




JOHN BOYD, 
Co. D. 



124 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REC.IMENT 



troops passing to and from the front through the city during 
the continuance of the war. On the arrival of the regiment at 
the Cooper Shop it was entertained by the good ladies in 
charge, and afforded a substantial meal. This institution and 
the Volunteer Refreshment Saloon, which adjoined the Cooper 
Shop, all Philadelphians should be proud of, as the hospitality 
here dispensed gave to the city a national reputation for 
patriotism and devotion to the cause. 

As the boys were anxious to get to their homes they were 
dismissed until 2 P. M., with the injunction from Colonel Glenn 
that he desired everv man to report promptly at that hour, as 
the volunteer firemen of the city (from whose ranks the Twenty- 
third was originally recruited), 
had arranged for a reception 
and street parade. 

At that time the regiment 
assembled, and, escorted by 
the Henry Guards, composed 
of city policemen and fourteen 
of the volunteer fire cora- 
I ) a 11 i e s (Delaware Engine, 
Good Will Hose, Western 
Hose, Perseverance Hose, As- 
sistance Engine, Washington 
Hose, Hope Engine, Moya- 
mensing Hose, Independence 
Engine and Shiftier Hose) and 
three ambulances of the de- 
partment belonging respec- 
tively to the Good Will Engine, the Franklin Hose and the 
Assistance Engine, proceeded along the line of march, during 
which they received the plaudits of their fellow-citizens, who 
thus evinced their appreciation of the gallant and enviable 
record the Twenty-third had gained during its long term of 

service. 

This ambulance system was another of the benefactions in 
the interests of the soldiers, as it was originally projected for 
the purpose of assisting in the relief of sick and wounded 
soldiers arriving in the city and removing them. This service 
was performed all through the war, voluntarily, and was 
greatly appreciated. 




LIEUT. FRANK LYNCH, Co. < . 

CAI'T. FRANK TAYLOR, Co. I. 



Pennsylvania volunteer infantry. 



125 



The procession was marshaled by Chief Engineer David 
M. Lvle, and proceeded over the following route : Along 
Washington avenue to Third, to South, to Twentieth, to Callow- 
hill, tu Sixteenth, to Chestnut, to Fifth, to Vine, to Ninth, to 
Race, tu National Guard's Hall, below Sixth street. All along 
the route at the street corners connected with the various com- 
panies hose carriages were stationed, and as the Twenty-third 
passed they sprung their bells as the citizens applauded. 
Afterwards the regiment was tendered a reception by City 
Councils. 

The Twenty-third was then dismissed, under orders to 
report at the City Armory, Race street, below Broad, on Sep- 
tember 8, 1864, at which date it was finally mustered out of 
service. 




126 HISTORY OF [TIE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 

Reminiscences in tKe Life of tHe 
TwentytHird Pennsylvania Volunteers 



CAMPS GRAHAM and BIRNE1Y — 1861-1862 

WHILE in Camps Graham and Birney the Twenty-third 
Regiment had a band of thirty-six pieces and drum 
corps of forty five. The favorite air of the Regiment was 
" Rory C Moore," and no matter how long the band played, 
the demand for their favorite air would continue until it was 
given. Both leader Herman and Drum Major Landenberg 
were favorites with the men. My, what a contract the drum 
major had in controlling his boys ! 

Nearly his entire time was occupied in looking after them. 
They were the most mischievous lot of youngsters possible to 
get together, and when the order for the reduction of the 
bands was issued in 1862, the band of the Twenty-third was 
mustered out. While connected with the regiment, the band 
was not only useful in parade and entertaining in camp, but 
was also of great service in caring for the wounded on the 
field. 

William H. Albertson, Company A, had the honor of 
wearing the first Zouave uniform of the Twenty-third regi- 
ment. He was given an order to call at Second and Dock 
streets and was soon fitted, the tailor telling him it was the first 
(or sample) suit made. After donning it lie, in company with 
one of the vivandieres of the regiment, full of pride, passed up 
Chestnut street on the way to the recruiting station at Ninth 
and Arch streets. 

The first arms issued to the regiment was the Harper's 
Ferrv muskets, which had been altered into ,-i rifle. They were 
most miserable weapons, were in bad condition, and proved 
to be the hardest kind of kickers. Ii was the best the govern- 
ment could do ; all the West -nils were in the hands oi the 
rebels, because before the war broke out all munitions ol war 
had been shipped to Southern arsenals, so thai " Uncle Sam " 

had to lake what was left. However, I iy purchasing amis 

abroad and inducing factories to work night and day, the army 



'ENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



127 



was s i equipped with the most improved arms. The Twenty- 
third exchanged the Harper's Ferry implements for the Aus- 
trian rifles, which were issued to us in the rough. With a 



were put in good condition. 




I \\i: S M \SLAND, 
Sergeant Co. F. 



little filing, however, they 
Like all pieces at that time, 
they were muzzle loaders, but 
were most efficient firearms. 
The writer fired out of his 
■ at Malvern Hill over 
sixty rounds without the least 
trouble. 

The pay of the private 
soldier in 1 86 1 was eleven dol- 
lars per month. This was paid 
in specie, but as the war pro 
gressed and the premium on 
gold rose higher, the pay was 
raised to thirteen dollars, and 
later to sixteen dollars per 
month, in greenbacks. The 
writer remembers that his first pay was nineteen dollars and 
some cents. When he had counted his money he found that 
he was two dollars and forty-nine cents short, and it was some 
time before he could account for the deficiency. Finally he 
found the paymaster had given him one of the new issue of 
pennies instead of a two-and-a-half dollar gold piece. The 
paymaster's attention was called to the error ; but, of course, 
as he never made mistakes, it had to go at that. 

Joseph McKinney, who had two brothers in the service 
consented to stay home and help the old folks. A few days 
after the Twenty-third went to Washington, he took a run 
down to see the boys. One of the members of Company E 
being home-sick, the boys got at Joe to take his place. This, 
he thought, was an opportunity to get into the service, as he 
felt that his father, when he learned the circumstances, would 
commend him for it. So Wilson, the invalid, was discharged, 
Joe was mustered in, and then given two weeks' leaye. On 
arriving home and explaining how he came to enlist, he received 
his father's blessings for doing such an honorable act. 



L28 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



PENINSULA CAMPAIGN 



Warwich Court House — YorKtown — "Williams- 
burg — Fair OaKs — Seven Days' Fig'Kt — 1862 

William H. Albertson, Company A, 23d Pennsylvania, 
and Regimental Quartermaster Sergeant, mentions that one 
of the bravest acts he witnessed during the service, was that 
of Albert B. Barry, Company A. When the lines were entering 
the fortifications at Yorktown, Sergeant Caldwell, who was 
marching ahead of Barry, stepped on a buried shell, and imme- 
diately the fuse began to emit smoke Barry, as cool as if in 
no danger, grabbed his canteen, which was full of water, and 
emptied it over the shell, putting it out, at the same time call- 
ing to his comrades, "Men, look out; it's a torpedo!" 
Albertson also recalls that on the day in June, 1862, 
when the Twenty-third Pennsylvania was supporting a 
brigade of the Second Corps on the picket line in front of 
Richmond, during the skirmish a lieutenant of one of the regi- 
ments came tottering in with his hand on his chest and fell ex- 
hausted at his feet. Upon passing his hand under him, 
Albertson found the lieutenant's hand full of silver, and em- 
bedded in the silver was a flattened rifle ball. The only in j un- 
done him was a torn vest pocket and a large red spot caused 
by the force of the blow. When the lieutenant recovered from 
the shock he explained that a few days before he had gone to a 
nearby farmhouse for a square meal and tendered a ten-dollar 
greenback in payment, receiving his change in silver. He 
placed the latter in his vest pocket, which lucky circumstance 
was probablv the means of saving his life. Another incident re- 
lated by the Quartermaster Sergeant is as follows : One night 
while on picket at Warwick, a Confederate officer came down 
near the creek swinging a lantern right and left, thus affording 
a good target. One of the men, John McGraw, was about to 
shoot, when Albertson grasped his rifle barrel, and at the same 
time whispered: "Don't fire, Jack ; it looks like murder to 
shoot him." No doubt the "Johnnie " owes his life to this act. 

When the Twenty-third Pennsylvania was on duty at 
Warwick Court House, Bill Hemphill, Mike Kennedy and 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



1 29 



Johnnie Kelly were on safety guard at a little farmhouse in the 
vicinity. After assuring the people at the house that their | >< is- 
sessions were perfectly safe — rations being very scarce at this 
time — they began figuring how to have a chicken stew with- 
out being guilty of taking the chicken. While they were de- 
liberating, Andy White, one of the fifers of Company F, 
came out to the post, so they took Andy around the place and 
showed him the fowls, meanwhile instructing him how to run 
the guards. While trying to explain these details they were 
surprised bv the old lady of the place putting in an appearance 
and accusing Andy of having been there the day before, and 
declared that he then cut off the head of her favorite rooster. 
Of course, that settled the 
little ruse. The guards drove 
" Whitey " off the place, and 
no chicken tickled the palates 
of the squad that day — all < in 
account of the "stuffy little 
drummer," as the old lady 
called Andy. 



In the action at Fair Oaks, 
when the men of the Twenty- 
third were ordered back from 
the first charge to reform line, 
on the wagon road that ran 
through the woods, one of the 
boys, seeing the colors lying 
on the ground brought them 




GEORGE Wool i 
Captain Co. E. 



safely into the line, carrying his gun in one hand and the flag 
in the other. As he reached the line he turned the colors over 
to one of the sergeants. Lieutenant Marchant, who commanded 
his company, and who witnessed the delivery of the colors to 
the sergeant inquired why he had clone so. " Well, you 
taught me to hold onto my gun under all circumstances, 
and as I could not carry both, I gave the colors to the ser- 
geant." The lieutenant replied, somewhat sternly, " Darn the 
gun! why didn't you throw it away ? You saved the colors 
and should have had all the honors." 



130 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



One night while on picket in the woods at Warwick 
Creek, the grand rounds found one of the men, Johnnie Con- 
nelly of F Company, Twenty-third Pennsylvania, missing from 
his post. All during the night there could be heard a faint 
call, which appeared to come from the woods, but no one 

knew exactly where to locate 
it. At daylight search was 
made for the missing picket, 
when it was found that he had 
fallen into an abandoned well. 
Having no ropes at hand, it 
was found quite a job to get 
him out, but with the aid of a 
twisted blanket and a number 
of suspenders, be was finally 
reached and hoisted to terra 
firma. When Dr. Roller ex- 
amined him, he found Con- 
nelly to be uninjured except 
from shock, and he continued 
joseph stokley, in the service until the mus- 

ter out. 




Co. G. 



The second night after the battle of Fair Oaks, Johnnie 
Kellv and Jake Lewis, of F Company, passed over our 
picket line and got into the camp outside of our line, reach- 
ing the line of tents of the field and staff. Kelly appropriated 
an officer's overcoat, blanket and haversack, and Lewis pos- 
sessed himself of a well-loaded haversack. Together they 
quietly crawled back through the line. When Kelly reached the 
company street he donned the officer's coat and then began 
strutting around, affecting all the airs possible. Suddenly, on 
making a search of the coat pockets, a sash and small red 
cap were discovered. Kellv then for the first time realized that 
he had possession of " Bucky " Will's coat. How to restore 
it without being detected and punished for venturing outside 
the linos was a questii >n. I5ut, as he desired the old man to get 
his coat, the night being somewhat chilly, Kelly determined 
to face the music. Accordingly he approached the colonel, 
saluted, and handed him the coat. The colonel asked Kelly 
how he got the coat, and when he told the circumstances he 



PENNSYLVANIA Y< ILUNTEER INFANTRY 



v.u 



gave Kellv all that w;is coming to him for his dereliction in 
going beyond the picket line. The colonel then turned on his 
heel and walked away. Kelly, feeling keenly the call-down, 
was on his way back to where a squad of the boys were en- 
joying his discomforture, when " Bucky" called out " F come 
back!" Then, [lulling out his manifold, he wrote something 
on a piece of paper, handed it to Kelly, and told him never to 
have occasion to be reprimanded again. Kelly, upon reading 
the missive by the light at the fire, found it was an order for a 
canteen of "commissary." This put the " judge " again in 
his element and the laugh was on the boys. Such was 
Bucky's way. 



The first year of the war was very trying to the men of 
the Twenty-third regiment as it took more than the regular 
clothing allowance to pay for their uniforms. Within a year 
they were compelled to purchase three distinct suits. The 
first was a Zouave uniform, 
which wore out in six months ; 
next a dark blue uniform, with 
dress coat, dog collar and epau- 
lettes, and finally blouse and 
blue pants. So at the end of 
the year from $8 to $15 were 
deducted from the accounts of 
those who had overdrawn their 
clothing allowance. One of the 
company's books was lost in 
action, and, a few days after the 
fight, while Lieutenant Mar- 
chant was having the pay rolls 
made out, a "coffee-cooler" 
who could never be got under 
fire, appeared with the book 
under his arm. He claimed that while prowling over the 
battlefield he found it. The boys therefore had to go short on 
that month's pay, as it was the settlement for the year, and 
the " Coffee Cooler " in consequence did police duty for a 
long time. 




HENRY G FRITS 
Captain Co. B. 



132 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



Twenty- third Pennsylvania at Fair OaKs 



By Jimmy SmitK, Co. H., 23d P. V. 

You soldiers all, both great and small, you heroes and you braves, 

Artillerymen and cavalry, likewise all you Zouaves ; 

I pray your attention, and hear what I do say, 

And you'll hear how the Twenty-third behaved on the 31st of May. 

About noon on Saturday the rebels hove in sight, 

Their courage raised by whiskey, they thought to show us fight, 

They thought by superior numbers to make us run away, 

But you'll hear how they were mistaken on the 31st of May. 

They first drove in our pickets and thought it a great feat, 

Saying now the day's our own, we've got the Yankees beat ; 

But they soon found out that fighting was a game that two could play 

And the rebels did the running on the 31st of May. 

They drove back Casey's division and thought the day their own, 

But the Twenty-third was ahead of them just like a wall of stone ; 

They tried very hard to drive us, but had to let us stay, 

For we would not yield, nor leave the field, on the Thirty-first of May. 

The Twenty-third was drawn up in line and ready for the strife, 

Each man for his country — would freely give his life ; 

The first volley that they gave us, our flag was shot away, 

Then fell the gallant Bolton on the Thirty-first of May. 

We gave them plenty Union pills, when our gallant Colonel Neill, 

Said: "Forward now my hearts of oak, and give them the cold steel : " 

The Twenty-third dashed boldly in — the rebels ran away, 

And in that charge brave Ely fell, on the Thirty-first of May. 

Vollev after volley our brave boys did on them pour, 

Then, Captains Wallace and Palmer fell bleeding in their gore ; 

The gallant young Lieutenant Wood, fell at his post that day, 

As many did in the Twenty-third on the 31st of May. 

The rebels thought to draw us on, showing a flag of truce, 

But Colonel Wilhclm was to sharp, he soon found out the ruse : 

We made another charge on them, they lied in wild dismay, 

Then gallant BoggS fell, cheering us, on the 31st of May. 

Many a good man in the ranks was made to Kite the dust, 

But soon we tilled their places, for we knew our cause was just ; 

When the rebels met the Twenty-third, their general he did say : 

" We have got too far from Richmond on the 31st of May." 

Here is long life and prosperity to our gallant Colonel Neill, 

Likewise to all our officers, their hearts are true' as steel ; 

And health to every private, that stood by us that day, 

And nobly fought for his country's ila>^ on the 31st of May. 



PENNSYLVANIA Y< (LUNTEER INFANTRY. 



133 



George Peiper of B Company, Twenty-third Pennsylvania, 
states that one day while on picket along Warwick Creek, 
" California foe," of Berdan's sharpshooters came to the 
reserve picket and wanted to know if they needed hisservices. 
The lieutenant took him out to the line and located one of 
the "Johnnies " who had been very troublesome, he having 
wounded several of the men. In a few minutes Joe fired and 
brought down the Reb. On his way back, one of the members 
of Company C was induced to hang his cap three hundred 
vards away in a tree in order to test the accuracy of Joe's aim. 
When the cap was brought in, it was found that the bullet had 
struck the letter " C " squarely in the centre. Joe was a most 
wonderful shot and whenever 
he was around the "Johnnies" 
kept well under cover. 

When Colonel Birney was 
promoted to brigadier general 
— the War Department, having 
fixed the maximum at iooo 
for infantry regiments — four 
companies of the Twenty-third 
Pennsylvania Volunteers, L, < >, 
P, and R were transferred to 
the Sixty-first Pennsylvania In- 
fantry. Company M was dis- 
banded and the men transferred 
to various companies of the 
Twenty-third. Not knowing 
that this was in compliance with orders from the War Depart- 
ment the men were very indignant, and the first time General 
Birney visited the camp to pay his respects to Colonel Neill — 
we were then bivouacked beyond the village of Hampton — 
instead of cheers he was jeered and accused of having sold 
the regiment. General Birney was about to leave the camp 
when Colonel Neill made his appearance, and the boys 
soon scattered. Shortly after this when the men learned of the 
action of the War Department, they were anxious to atone 
for their disrespect to General Birney, and in some measure 
also repay the debt of gratitude due him for his kindness 
when the regiment came out of the fight at Fair Oaks in 




XEAL McFADDEN, 
Co. C. 



134 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD RECIMENT 



giving the men rations from his commissary. The opportunity 
came on the third day after the action, while the regiment was 
moving up on the banks of the railroad. General Birney and 
his staff came riding down on the opposite side. As soon 

as the men saw him, they began 
cheering, and wheeling to the 
front, he stood with his hat off, 
and as each company passed 
they gave him rousing cheers. 
No doubt he was pleased to 
again enjoy the good will of his 
old command. Ever afterwards 
when he visited the camp Gen- 
eral Birney was given an ova- 
tion by the boys. He was a 
kind and considerate com- 
mander, a most distinguished 
and brave soldier, and one of 
the two civilian soldiers that 
rose to the command of an 
army corps. He always main- 
tained his love and pride for his first command — the Twenty- 
third Pennsylvania Volunteers. 




JAMES C0LW1 I I 
Lieutenant t'o. A. 



Fred. Huber, First Sergeant Company F, was killed at 
Fair Oaks, and was buried where he fell. A few weeks after 
the fight his father, Dr. Huber, of Gettysburg, came down to 
take his remains home. Volunteers went out and disinterred 
the body, carrying it to Savage Station, where it was shipped 
North and buried in Evergreen Cemetery at Gettysburg 
where a tombstone was placed over his grave. During the 
battle of Gettysburg, General Hunt, in charge of the 
artillery, in stationing the batteries in the Cemetery ordered 
the tombstones to be laid down. As a young sapling grew in 
front of Huber's resting place, his tombstone was left standing 
and it was the only tombstone that was damaged during the 
artillery duel. The family, when they brought his body to 
Gettysburg, never thought a battle would wage all round 
that then quiet section, but such is War! 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER [NFANTKY. 



135 



During the Seven Days' Fight Sher Smith, of H Com- 
pany, was on picket at the Crossing of White Oak Swamp. 
While Porter's siege trains were passing to the rear, the head 
of the wagon train, loaded with (|uartermaster's supplies, had 
reached Smith's post and, being headed for Richmond, he halted 
it and reported the matter to Captain Craig, in charge of the 
picket The latter sent Smith to Colonel Neill, then in charge 
of the brigade, for instructions. While standing at arms-a-port 
delivering his message, the quartermaster of the train came 
bustling up and wanted to know the name and regiment of 
the officer that halted his train, saying that he always took a 
memorandum of just such smart officers. The colonel ordered 
Smith to come to order arms and answer the quartermaster. 
He replied that the officer's name was Lieutenant James M. 
Craig, of H Company, Twenty-third Pennsylvania. When 
"Bucky" heard the Twenty-third mentioned, he thundered 
out, in his well-known manner : " That's my regiment, sir ! 
and these men were doing their duty. Go back to your train, 
pull it off the road, and park it, until I can ascertain from Gen- 
eral Couch, across the swamp, 
what he wants done." Smith 
returned to his picket post, 
and when the quartermaster 
passed him, on the way back 
to the wagon train, the latter 
wanted to know the name of 
the general, saying that he 
never before had found a man 
so full of bristles. When told 
that he was Colonel of the 
Twenty-third regiment, and 
acting brigadier general, the 
quartermaster volunteered the 
remark that " he certainly knew 
how to stand up for his own 

r JACOB H.EYER, 

Command." Captain Co. A. 




The Twenty-third Pennsylvania had a fire-dog called 
"Dash"; he seemed to know all the boys and was in his 
element when under fire. At Fair Oaks he and the chap- 
lain were captured, but during the night both got back to 



136 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



the lines. " Dash " becoming too fat to keep up on the 
march, the boys took turns at carrying him. He was 
\\( »unded, honorably discharged, and shipped to the Delaware 
Engine House, where he belonged. He never reached there, 

however, as he was lost on the 
way up from the front. 

The Twenty-third, after its 
night march to reach Malvern 
Hill, was bivouacked at the 
edge of the woods, awaiting 
the coming up of the division. 
Soon the men were down and 
asleep. The road was filled 
with debris from the battle of 
Charles City Cross-Roads, es- 
pecially broken down artillery 
and stragglers. The latter 
passed along the edge of 
the woods to keep out of the 
dust of the road, and a guard 
was stationed on each flank to drive them back to the road, so 
that the}- would not disturb the men who were asleep. This 
kept the guards busy ; a lieutenant colonel was among those 
halted and ordered out to the road. He at once asserted his 
authority of rank and tried to push forward. " Bucky," who 
had kept awake, witnessed the occurrence, and thundered out 
in a quick succession of sentences : " Who are you ? where is 
your regiment, sir? What are you doing here? Sentry, put 
him out on the road!" And as the sentry jabbed at the 
lieutenant colonel's horse, the latter suddenly backed out 
into the road. Colonel Neill then ordered the sentry to call 
the corporal of the guard. The corporal reported to the colo- 
nel, but soon came back with orders to take off the guards and 
give the sentries a chance to sleep. Such was the consideration 
of dear old " Bucky " Neill for the welfare of his troops. 




WM. W. MILFORD, 
Co. H. 



At Malvern Hill just before the last charge of the "John- 
nies," Charles \V. Hess, drummer of H Company, Twenty-third 
Pennsylvania, assisted one of the wounded of the regiment 
from the field to the hospital, and on the way back to the 



PENNSYLVANIA V< ILUNTEER INFANTRY. 



137 



lines with a comrade from another regiment, it became so dark 
that thev could not locate their respective regiments. Finally, 
thev laid down among the dead and wounded, and at daylight 
were awakened by one of the cavalry going through the dead 
men. When he discovered 
thev were alive, he informed 
them that the army had pulled 
out for Harrison's Landing, 
and that the Reb's skirmishers 
were even then coming out of 
the woods — a quarter of a mile 
away. Hess' companion was 
so completely played out and 
broken in spirit when he found 
the army had departed, that no 
amount of coaxing could in- 
duce him to follow, so at last 
Hess suggested that they play 
a game of " seven up " to de- 
cide what course they should 
take ; if he won, they were to 
push on and overtake the army ; if he lost, he could stav and 
be captured. Hess won, so they " hiked out " and caught the 
army that night at Harrison's Landing. 




ARCHIBALD SMITH, 
Co. E. 



At Harrison's Landing one afternoon, on dress parade, 
the officers were called to the front and, in a few endearing 
words, Colonel Neill presented to Second Lieutenant James M. 
Craig a beautiful sword, which the members of his company 
had procured for him at Philadelphia. This brave, modest 
and unassuming soldier was quite embarrassed, but he 
managed to return his thanks. It was, indeed, a pleasure to 
all the regiment to see this mark of esteem bestowed upon 
him, as he was well-liked by everybody. 



138 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 

SEVEN DAYS' FIGHT. 

By Jimmy Smith, Co. H, 23d P. V. 

Away down in old Virginia not many months ago, 
McClellan made a movement, and he made it very slow. 
The rebels they soon found it out and pitched into our rear, 
They got the very deuce, for they found old Kearney there. 

Chorus. — In the old Virginia lowlands, lowlands, lowlands, 
In the old Virginia lowlands, low. 
Again at Savage Station we met the rebel foe, 
That General Sumner whipped them, their list of killed will show. 
Then righting Josey Hooker, he came up with his train, 
He met them on the third day, and walloped them again. 

Chorus. 

The rebels they still followed us, their numbers two to one, 

But " Little Mac," he let them see that Yankees would not run; 

For every place they attacked us, we dearly made them pay, 

And when the shades of night fell 'round us, we coolly walked away. 

Chorus. 

Again they tried to surround us and attack us in the rear, 
But every place they showed themselves they found the Yankees there. 
" Mac" thought that he would stop the fun and bring it to an end; 
Tin- only way to do that was for Couch's men to send. 

Choris. 

When we heard that Mac had sent for us with joy our hearts did fill, 

And we were quickly ready on the top of Malvern Mill. 

The rebels they advanced on us but we were not dismayed, 

They might as well have met the devil as Abercrombie and his Brigade. 

Chorus. 

Tin- rebels they commenced the light by throwing shot and shell, 
That was a game theysoon found oul that Couch's men could them 

exi el. 
We fought them from morning dawn until the setting sun, 
Among the killed ami wounded, why, they had three to one. 

Chori s. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 139 



The Twenty-third, the Eighty-second, were early on the ground, 
The Sixty-first and the New York Chasseurs, soon showed themselves 

around. 
Then came the First Long Island, we all did our work quite well, 
As many a wounded rebel from experience can tell. 

Chorus. 

When we came to James River the boys began to cheer, 
When they saw the little Monitor up the river she did steer. 
The rebel General got scared and unto his men did say, 
" Here comes a Yankee earthquake, we had better get away." 

Chorus. 

Now all you politicians a word I have for you, 
Let our Little Mac alone for he is tried and true. 
And you have found out lately that he is our only hope, 
For he saved the Capitol, likewise McDowell and Pope. 

Chorus. 

Now I think I will finish and bring this to an end, 
With three cheers for Little Mac — he's everv soldier's friend. 
1 would like all agitators and politicians to understand, 
If inie can save the Union, why Little Mac's the man. 

Chori s. 




14(1 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 

Bull Run and .Antietam Campaign 
1862 

DURING the Bull Run campaign the Twenty-third Penn- 
sylvania came up from the peninsula and disembarked 
from the transports at Alexandria, and while waiting 
for the balance of the brigade, the regiment stacked arms in 
front of a grocery store, the men seating themselves on the 
curbstone Around the awning of the store was hung brand 
new quart tin cups — the kind the soldiers did most of their 
cooking in. Soon the store was filled with the boys, who pre- 
tended to buy. Suddenly someone cut the string to which the 
cups were attached, and down they came. Such scrambling! 
In the midst of all this excitement one man ran out of the 
store carrying a whole cheese. As he turned the corner of the 
house into a vacant lot the cheese fell out of his arms and 
rolled down the hill to a fence with the crowd scrambling 
around it. One of the boys thinking to steal a march, climbed 
the fence and with his knife burrowed a hole under the fence 
and was soon cutting slices of the cheese and stuffing it into 
his buttoned blouse when all of a sudden the fence came down 
nearly squeezing the life out of him. When he was pulled out 
of the wreck he was smeared all over with cheese and as he 
came back to his chum, who inquired what he got, replied — 
" Got nearly squashed to death, nevermind old boy there goes 
inspection ; 1 have half of a ham hid under that door step." 
After inspection nothing being found, as the rain was pouring 
in torrents, the regiment was moved to some open govern- 
ment carpenter shops to await the arrival of the division and 
soon most everybody was engaged in cooking eggs, frying 
ham, etc. It is hoped that the quartermaster settled with the 
grocer. 

As we were pushing lor the front in the direction oi Bull 
Run, we found stragglers and collce coolers Iron) McDowell's 
and Pope's commands, on both sides oi the road. A regular 
army officer, who knew Colonel Will, commenting upon the 
Straggling, wagered a bottle of wine, that several men in die 
held were members of his old regiment. The bet was accepted 



PENNSYIA VNIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



1 11 



and away they went to determine it. Upon reaching the men, 
sure enough the figures on the caps, were 23d. The colonel 
in hi-, peremptory way, wanted to know what regiment they 
belonged to, one of them replying, Twenty-third New Jersey. 
Alter reprimanding them for 
being away from their com- 
mand, ordered them back to 
the road and as they pulled 
out, "Bucky," with his bland 
smile, claimed to have won the 
bet. That night, as the men 
were in bivouac, cooking their 
supper, the colonel came 
among them and tapping one 
of the boys, Johnnie Carri- 
gan, on the shoulder, ex- 
claimed, " That's right, my 
man, whenever you straggle 
don't belong to the Twenty- 
third Pennsylvania. " 




J.U'i IB li iw, 
Co. G. 



After the Antietam campaign, a detail of the Twenty- 
third was placed on headquarters' guard. On the march down 
into Virginia, rations were short, the country having been 
gone over by both armies, but little was left when the com- 
mand reached Little Baltimore. The headquarters' wagon com- 
ing up, the general's tent was put up. One of the detail 
found in the general's wagon about one-half bushel of potatoes 
and soon the guard was frying and stewing the " Murphies," 
when who should turn up but "Bucky" Neill's cook. It was then 
learned that " Bucky'' was in command of the brigade and that 
the guard had cleaned him out of rations. What was left was 
hastily gathered up and quietly slipped back into the wagon. 
Soon the guard was drawn up in front of his quarters, repri- 
manded upon foraging, especially upon the commissary of the 
general, and was relieved by a squad of the Sixty-fifth New York 
(Chasseurs) and sent to the regiment. This was one of the 
times they made a mistake, as nothing was too good for 
"Bucky." Had they known he was at headquarters, they 
would have gone to sleep hungry. 



142 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 

FredericKsburg' — Marye's Heig'Hts and Salem 

Church Campaigns. 

1862—1863. 

AT Marye's Heights, when the skirmishers of the Twenty- 
third Pennsylvania advanced through the fog, to feel the 
enemy, the orders were upon receiving fire, to fall back a short 
distance to a slight depression in the ground, lay down and 
await the orders to charge. The Rebs opened a se- 
vere fire as they neared the stone wall and one of 
the men wounded was Charley Smallwood, of Company 
G. To get out of range of the fire, he crawled over 
to a house that stood on the edge of the road, it being occu- 
pied by Confederate sharpshooters, he was taken prisoner and 
turned over to the trenches in the sunken road, the Mississip- 
pians telling him how they would annihilate the Yanks when 
they came on the charge. Here he was left until the assault, 
and as our line swept into the sunken road, the Johnnies broke 
and he found he was among his own people. Com- 
pany G was rejoiced to know that Charley was recap- 
tured. After recovering from his wound he came back and 
remained until the end of the war. 

The men of the Twenty-third Pennsylvania had been lying 
in support of a battery at Fredericksburg, until they be- 
came somewhat cramped and finally one and then the other got 
up to stretch his legs, until there was too many of them standing 
up, which drew the fire of the enemy's guns, as well as his 
sharpshooters. Of course we were under orders, close under fire, 
could not fire a shot, as our batters' in front was doing the 
work, 'in the call ot one of the officers to lie down, all went 
down close to the ground, except Dan Donnelly, or old man 
Donnelly as we called him. At last the captain peremptorily 
ordered him down not wanting to have him exposed need 
lesslv. "Well, captain, 1 must obey your orders, but do you 
call this fighting? Give me 50 men and I will take the battery 
on von hill, so with such kids as wait until it cools oil, we will 
buy a little battery lor you." Dan laid down. Bui all the 
same we knew that Donnelly meant just what he said, as he 
had been well tested I ief( ire 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 143 



•-*«*; 



His son was wounded in the charge at Fair Oaks by 
being- struck on the belt plate and doubled up — he could 
scarcely walk. The old man, after examining him, finding no 
blood, pushed him forward until he was again hit, this time 
in the ankle. Old Dan, think- 
ing to save his life, cut the 
ball out with his razor. Dan 
was sent to the hospital and 
wrote the boys he was going 
in the Navy, as the old man 
was too much for him. 

While the old man could 
never be taught to keep step, 
he was a most excellent, 
brave, obedient and fearless 
soldier ; tough as nails, 
standing the campaign until 
the end with the best of us. 




When the Twentv third 



I>K. G. W. , > El (MANS, 



Pennsylvania went into Asst. surgeon, 

camp near White Oaks Church in November, 1862, the wagon 
trains were away back, so the regiment went on picket duty 
without rations. This part of the country had been for- 
aged by both armies, so there was little left ; but some of 
the boys on the picket reserve found a cache of potatoes and 
divided them as far as they would go. While they were roasting 
them, an ex-Confederate who had lost his leg in one of the 
battles on the Peninsula, loomed up on his wooden leg and 
told the boys that he was living in a log house back in the 
woods and when he went to the cache for some potatoes, 
found that some one had cleaned him out. Of course they did 
not know that they had cleaned out an old Johnnie Reb, so the 
reserve picket invited him to share with them the meal of roasted 
potatoes. When they got back to camp the wagons were up, 
rations were distributed and a cracker box loaded with sup- 
plies was carried out to the old Yet. Before leaving here, 
two more box loads were taken out to his log house, so 
Johnnie was bridged over for that winter. 



144 



HISTORY (il THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT] 



Dr. William C. Roller, Surgeon of the Twenty-third 
Pennsylvania, says the most singular wound he was called 
upon to attend while in the service was that of Major 
Healy, of the Chasseurs, Sixty-fifth New York, in the 
early morning of the day that Marye's Heights was assaulted, 
after the Sixty-fifth New York had charged and cleared the 
way at Hazel Run, the Twenty-third took the advance into 
Fredericksburg. When the regiment got into the town, he told 
Stiney, who carried the medicine chest, to find a house with a 
piano and saw the legs off so it could be used as an operating 
table. Stein soon reported and Roller was arranging mat- 
ters to transact business when the first one to be bought in was 

Major Healy. They were old 
time friends and upon examin- 
ing him found he had been 
wounded in the abdomen. Not 
being able to find the place 
where the ball had passed out, 
he concluded he was mortally 
wounded, and cheering the 
Major up, told him he would 
send him across the river ami 
home to his parents in New 
York City, which was done. 
Si line time that winter the doc- 
tor was writing a letter when a 
rap came on the tent pole and 
calling out "Come in", who 
should appear but Major Healy ; he was more than agreeably 
surprised to find him alive. "Whv, Major, old boy, how did you 
manage to survive ? " Haley remarked " it wasn't such a bad 
wound after all When I got home and was carried to bed, the 
old family doctor was called iii, and of course started to exam- 
ine me, but 1 was so sore and swelled up that I kicked about 
being turned over, I nit he would have his own way ami 
turning me over he Eound dial the hall had passed entirely 
around me, coming out at the point of entrance, it could be 
plainly traced by the line of inflammation." Dr. Roller was a 
most noted surgeon in the field during the entire war. He died 
in iooo, at Mollidavsburg, Pennsylvania. Major Healyserved 

the war out ami resides in Washington. 




ARCHIB \l 1 1 M IKILL, 

Co. I). 



PENNSYLVANIA V( (LUNTEER INFANTRY. 



145 



One of the boys of the Twenty-third Pennsylvania, tells 
this story oi Pat Hickey of Company F. They were chums 
at home, and when under lire Pa1 always covered him in die 
ranks. At Fredericksburg they were both wounded, no doubt 
bv the same hall, one in the head, the other in the left arm. 
On the way back to the rear, assisted by Billy Craig, they 
struck a double ambulance. Putting the other fellow into it, 
Craig bid them good-bye and craw led back to his place in the 
company, as the enemy was at this time sweeping the ground 
with his batteries. Just then a shell passing near the ambu- 
lance, frightened the driver, and jumping off, away went the 
team Hickey with his one arm tried to check them and find- 
ing it was no use, got out on the step and catching his chum's 
waist-band jumped off and out he came, sock on the ground 
completely knocking him out. Just then one of the wounded 
I lassing, helped him back to the rear, where he fell into the hands 
of Surgeon Roller of the Twenty-third. After doing what was 
possible to stop the flow of blood, he told Hickev to stick to 
him. This he did, remaining with him until the army re- 
crossed the river, although, during Sunday and Monday, he 
had the chance like all others 
who were able to travel to go 
Ni >rth. Hick got a $5 bill from 
one of the officers and walked 
six miles to the train and 
bought a can of beef tea. It 
was eleven days before they 
reached the hospital at Wash- 
ington, he caring for his chum 
during that time. When they 
came up before the surgeon for 
examination for furlough, 
given according to the disa- 
bility, not exceeding sixty 
days, Hickey got thirty and 
his chum sixty, his chum asked 
that his be reduced to thirty. 
This surprised the surgeon and when told how faithful 
Pat had been, gave him sixty days. As they passed down 
Pennsylvania Avenue on the way to take the train, they 
ran across Dr. Roller who had taken a run up for a few days 




Ji IHN M« ill II I . 
Co. F. 



146 



HISTORY OK THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



from the front. He had just drawn his pay, was glad to meet 
the boys, found them dead broke and gave each a $5 bill. 
These facts are a sample of the Twenty-third, they always 
stuck to each other. 




**'," 









fcftdi 






,^;, fl J 



■ 



AL< »NG THE CHICK. MM IMINY. 



General Alexander Shaler, the brigade commander, in 
responding to the toasl of Marye's Heights, at the Twenty- 
third's banquet, Fairmounl Park, Philadelphia, in [886, stated 
he was glad thai Chaplain Shinn had so ably gone over the 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNT] I R INFANTRY, 



w; 



ground in his vivid description of the events of that engage- 
ment, that he could but add that he had the honor to be there, 
audit was his fortune to have command of the supporting 
column on the right, composed of the Eighty-second Pennsyl- 
vania and Sixty-seventh New York. The charging column, 
Sixty-firsl Pennsylvania and Forty-third New York, was under 
the command of that brave and efficient officer Colonel Spear, 
who was killed while leading the charge across the causeway. 
These regiments were prepared for the charge in the 
streets of Fredericksburg under shelter of the houses, and the 
long wait before we had orders to move, was a most severe 
strain on the officers and men. We all realized what was to be 
done and anxiously awaited the order to advance ; messages 
were hastily written home, and when the order came it seemed 
a relief. As the column moving by fours passed to the outer 
edge of the town, the enemy opened a most destructive fire 
of artillery and musketry from the Heights, rifle pits and from 
the famous stone wall at its base, and for a moment the head 
of the column staggered and wavered. Spear fell, the ranks 
were closed, and the rush made 
but only to be again checked. 
Perceiving this, I pushed up the 
supports and in a solid mass 
the column rushed onward over 
the wall and up the Heights. 
We knew that after passing the 
stone wall we had turned their 
flank. Hastening up the 
Heights mv first thoughts were 
to get the men into some forma- 
tion and this required no little 
effort, as they were wild with 
enthusiasm and filled with 
ecstasv over the important cap- 
ture. Looking around, I saw 
my two gallant aides — Lieuten- 
ants Armstrong and Johnson 
of the Twenty-third Pennsylvania — at mv side and gave them 
orders to have the regimental flags stationed in line and to 
instruct in speedily forming line of battle without regard to 
companies or regiments, as one thousand resolute men that 




JOHN YOUNG, 
Co. E. 




1 1- 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



149 



might possibly lie rallied behind the hill, would have swept us 
back from the heights. Our lines were soon formed upon the 
colors of the Sixty-first and Eighty-second Pennsylvania within 
the works. 

1 remember in looking off towards the left to see our 
lines of battle which plainly told the whole position had been 
taken. 

Before moving, out on the charge, I remember seeing the 
Twenty-third Pennsylvania lying in front of the stone wall or 
sunken road where I had placed them, holding that position un- 
der a severe fire, and I want to say to the Twenty-third, that they 
are entitled to great praise, not only for the patient manner in 
which they uncomplainingly held so exposed a position six long 
hours, but for volunteering to join the charge on the Heights as 
they were not of the charging column. Seeing troops over at a 
redoubt, near the little brick-walled cemetery on the apex of 
the Heights, I sent Lieutenant Johnson over to learn what 
troops they were, and upon reporting to me learned it was the 
Twenty-third ; they had gone in with the Sixth Maine and Fifth 
Wisconsin, under Colonel 
Johns, crossing the sunken road 
and scaling the Heights. 

Your Chaplain mentions in 
his oration, that I was the first 
mounted officer inside the 
enemy's works. Well, reallv, 1 
won't say as to that, but if I was, 
Lieutenant Armstrong of my 
staff was a good second. Poor 
fellow, he was a brave, gentle- 
manly officer, and now lies 
sleeping in a heroe's grave. 
Lieutenant Johnson, also of my 
staff, had his horse injured in the 
charge as we approached the 
base of the hill, but he crawled 
up with the rest of the column and reported to me — dis- 
mounted, and was there almost as soon as I. Before closing, 
I want to add my endorsement of Chaplain Shinn's description 
of the fight, and particularly that part in the vicinity of Marye's 
Heights as being a most truthful story, much more accurate 




DANIEL I i i\\ . 
Co. E. 



150 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 

than any I have read. The advance to Salem Church, you 
will remember, did not begin until late in the afternoon, the 
delay being caused by the First Division under General Brooks 
being ordered from this position, three miles below, to take the 
advance. Many things might have been done, but it is not my 
place to criticise superior officers then, and no good can come 
from doing so now. One thing is certain, we should not have 
allowed Wilcox's Brigade, who were at Bank's Ford to escape. 
The whole country to the left was open, giving a splendid 
opportunity to move in deployed lines and so encompass 
the fugitives in the woods to the right and capture them 
all. It was a brilliant feat of arms to take the Heights and 
was another laurel added to the coronet of the Old Sixth 
Corps. 

The part taken by the Twenty-third Pennsylvania, you 
may well be proud of, and I congratulate you that in this, as 
in all the battles of the Grand Old Army of the Potomac, the 
gallantry of the regiment was conspicuous. 




NON-Ci IMMISSION] I' STAFF. 
\\M. II \i beb i son, Q M Sergt. 
Ik \ Wl BS it R, Sei ^:i Majoi 
Oliver T. Eckekt, Com.-Sergt. 
i \ \i ■ , Hospital Steward 



PENNSYLVANIA V< >Ll'NTEE R INFANTRY. 151 



Gettysburg Campaign 
1863 

At Gettysburg a ball hit |<>lm Quinn of E Company, 
Twenty-third Pennsylvania, <>n the lieel of his shoe, glancing 
off, striking Henry Dougherty on the breast. When examined 
it was found the ball had struck a daguerreotype of his best 
girl, thus saving his life, while he had a very painful breast for 
some time; he lived to serve his time out and married the girl. 

Chaplain Shinn, of the Twenty-third Pennsylvania, took 
the pains while in service to ascertain the average age of the 
men of the regiment at enlistment, and found it to be nineteen 
years. After the dedication of the monument at Gettysburg, 
the writer, in company with Sergeant James Spence, visited 
the field, and upon reaching the Twenty-third monument, 
Spence after having inspected it and reading the inscription, ex- 
pressed himself as being very much pleased with it, with the 
exception of the statue surmounting it, which he thought was 
too youthful a figure. " Why, what age do you think that 
figure represents?" "I should say it was a bo}' of nineteen years 
of age." "Spence, when were you born?" "In July, 1844." 
" Well add nineteen to that and you will find vou were nine- 
teen years old when you laid over there in the line on July 2d 
and 3rd, 1863." 



One of tKe Boys of the 23d in Hospital at Yorh, 

Pa., Abounded, Tells of Gordon's Advance 

Upon That Place and Wrig'Ktsville 

On Lee's invasion of Pennsylvania in 1863, we were in 
hospital at York, Pa., recovering from wounds received at 
Fredericksburg. When the Governor of Pennsylvania sent a 
request to the hospital for volunteers, the surgeon in charge 
assembled the boys on dress parade, and after reading Governor 
Curtin's telegram he requested all those who desired to volun- 
teer for field service, in the State, to step one pace to the front, 
when 187 of the boys responded, it being left to their decision 
to choose their officers to command the battalion. Canvassing 



152 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 




VV. J. BAKER, 
Corporal Co. E. 



was commenced and after casting ballot, a sergeant of the 
Second Wisconsin was elected our captain, and if my memory 
serves me right, a one-armed Philadelphia boy was selected 
first lieutenant, and a New York high private our second 

lieutenant. Of the 187 it was 
said 185 were wounded men, 
the balance of the hospital 
boys looked upon the whole 
affair as a huge joke or I might 
say scare of the Governor's. 
After organizing we were dis- 
missed with orders to be ready 
at any moment. The first 
night we were placed on 
picket to try how the old thing 
worked, as the Johnnies at 
that time were probably near 
South Mountain, some fifty 
miles or more away. After 
several days of lounging 
around the hospital during 
the dav and picketing at night, one of our scouts, for we 
had selected a sergeant of the First Maine Cavalry and 
another Philadelphia cavalryman, who had been off on scout 
duty since our entree into the new service, rode into the hos- 
pital grounds, and after a hurried consultation with the sur- 
geons, preparations were at once made for the removal of the 
hospital inmates and property to Columbia, ten miles in rear 
on the north bank of the Susquehanna, and before the next 
morning, about the only ones left was the battalion. About 
4 P. M. we marched out the pike towards Gettysburg. When 
four miles out we returned hurriedly and took the last 
train lor Wrights ville, none too soon, fur the mounted infantry 
of Early's Corps appeared on all the hills and formed a 
cordon around the town. After an exchange of shots at very 
long range, we arrived at Wrightsville, opposite Columbia, 
where some militia were entrenched, and about daylight we 
were thrown out on picket skirmish line. Some time about 
noon the Rebs began feeling their way in by shelling, the 
Inst shell passing over to the entrenchments. A cloud 
of dust then going towards the river, indicated that the 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



153 



militia were being withdrawn across the bridge and the bat- 
talion left to get all the glory. We hadn't long to wait as 
skirmishers soon appeared and we had it quite lively for some 
time. 

Our captain thought it about time to end the fun, or 
else we might have become boarders at Libbv, Andersonville, 
etc., and word was passed along the line to rally on the centie, 
which was in an open field, in full view of the Johns. As soon 
as all were in, he gave the command left face, and we marched 
steadily by the flank, until we reached a deep road along the 
river, from where it was everyone for himself, to reach the 
bridge. We found it barricaded with heavy timbers. The 
bridge was a covered one, one and a quarter miles long, with 
a foot walk on the east side. One of the boys took the foot 
walk, and alter running one-quarter mile, discovered his retreat 
cut off, as the bridge on that side had been cut and not know- 
ing how to swim, he took his chance of going back to the 
mouth of the bridge. Fortunately, he found a window, crawled 
through and landed across the dead line. The bridge was 
not only sawed in two a quarter of a mile from the mouth, but 
was saturated with oil and 
combustible matter. Soon the 
rebs came dashing into the 
bridge and we had a soft thing 
on them, firing from behind 
the uprights of the bridge — but 
orders must be obeyed and the 
bridge was fired. We lounged 
around, until the smoke and 
flames made it a race for life to 
reach the other end, a mile 
away, and when we got there, 
found that the artillery boys 
from the hospital had two 
twelve pounders planted to 
sweep the bridge and by that 
confounded order didn't get a 
chance to fire a shot. The impression of the old soldiers 
was then, and belief now is, that the bridge should not 
have been fired, but the commander thought differently 
and- another one and a half millions of debt, was the 




JOB T. HICKMAN, 
Lieutenant Co. H. 



154 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 




result. The battalion was the guest of the town and the good 

people of Columbia made our forced visit a most pleasant one. 

The next morning it was discovered that the enemy was 

leaving. Twenty of the battalion volunteered to cross the river, 

so securing a boat and rope, 
soon established a ferry. Find- 
ing Gordon's brigade had with- 
drawn, the battalion was 
ordered over, and by easy 
stages, marched back to York, 
picking up on the way many 
reb stragglers. The people of 
York were not of the Union 
loving kind before the rebs 
came, and the levies that were 
made upon them by the Con- 
federates, was rather a severe 
lesson to a sympathizer. If they 
did not relish the blue before, 
they did now, and we were 
heartily welcomed. After sev- 
eral days of duty, scouring the country, bringing in reb strag- 
glers, we disbanded and took our station at our Ward Beds. We 
had a mother's and father's likeness, tied up in a silk pocket 
American flag, under the head of our bed, and when we looked 
for it, it wasn't there. If the ex-Confederate who may have it 
in his possession, will send his address to the Secretary of the 
Twenty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, he will be pleased to 
correspond. 

Our scouts did some valuable services during this cam- 
paign and related many an exciting incident of the times they 
had among the rebs to the boys around the hospital camp fire. 

William Milford of Company H, Twenty-third Pennsyl- 
vania, while lying in the breastworks at "Culp's Hill, on the 
morning of July 3d, picked up the head of a penny which some 
one had cut out, probably to make a stickpin. Some months 
afterwards while on reserve picket under Lieutenant Vodges 
of F Company, talking over campaigns, told of a relic he 
found at Gettysburg, and pulling ii out showed it to the lieu- 
tenant. 



GEORGK W. PALMER, 
Corporal Co. H. 



PENNSYLVANIA V( (LUNTEER INFANTRY 



155 



" Why, Milford, you are the man I have been looking 
for," and pulling out of his pocket a ring or rim of a penny, it 
was found the two pieces fitted together. The lieutenant 
statetl that he had found the ring when the regiment went over 
from Culp's Hill to the left of 
Meade's headquarters, on the 
afternoon of July 3d. He gave 
the relic to Milford. and when 
the regiment erected its monu- 
ment at Culp's Hill, Gettys- 
burg, in 1886, Milford had the 
relic go in with others that are 
now in the box sunken in the 
lower base of the monument. 

The Twenty-third Penn- 
sylvania was on its way over 
from Little Round Top in the 
early morning of July 3d, to the 
support of Geary's Division at 
Culp's Hill; as they crossed the 
Baltimore Pike at the Spangler House, a shell knocked some 
bricks out of the chimney of the farmhouse. Three country- 
men or citizens, perhaps belonging at the house, were com- 
menting on the destruction of the battle, and wanted to know 
why the troops could not keep on the roads to do their fight- 
ing and not come tramping down the crops. It was quite 
amusing to the boys from their point of view. 

When they reached the position they were cheered by the 
troops, as re-enforcements were very much needed in that part 
of the field that had been so hotlv contested. 




HENRY CREASE, 
1st Sergeant Co. B. 



156 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



RappahannocK Station — Mine Run — Brandy 

Station — Johnson's Island 

1863—1864 

THE Twenty-third Pennsylvania in the mid-winter of 1864 
on their way out to Johnson Island, in passing through 
one of the stations of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad in 
West Virginia, saw several barrels of chickens and turkeys on 
the platform, ready for shipment. Soon the boys were lighting 
fires and having a good time roasting fowls.to the discomfiture 
of the station master. Quartermaster Chandler was hunted 
up and of course gave him full allowance in due bills to 
cover the losses. 

Johnnie Kelly of the Twenty-third Pennsylvania says that 
while laying at Brandy Station, Harry Barnholt of Company 
F got a canteen of commissary and in order that the boys 
could not get away with it, sat upon it, while he was playing 
a game of poker. Every time he would raise up to take in the 
pot, he would pull up the canteen and take one for luck. Finally 
the boys got a canteen full of water and when he rose up to 
take in the next pot, slipped his canteen out, replacing it with 
the one with water and feeling good over his win, Harry 
pulled the canteen up to take another smile, and when he 
found it was water, it broke him and the game up. 

While at Johnson's Island, the boys of the Twenty- third 
Pennsylvania who did not re-enlist decided to give the veter- 
ans a reception upon their rejoining the regiment from fur- 
lough. As there were lots of wild geese on the lake, Sergeant 
Bill Green and Johnnie Kelly started out with a pocket full of 
slugs to the feeding grounds while Trotter Boyle and Davy 
Colville and others made preparations to have a good roast. 
When the hunters returned without the fowl, it was explained 
that when Green started up the birds, they came with such a 
sudden whirl directly over them that it kept Green busy to 
keep his feet on the slippery ice, while Kelly with the gun 
loaded, slipped and fell and lying on his back, blazed away. 
How he ever missed them was a puzzler. Some of the boys 



i,.!.,.'^, aw 




MS* 



15S HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 

charged Green with loading the gun with beans in place of 
slugs; perhaps the geese flew too high before Kelly could get 
a shot at them; however there were other things to provide 
and one of the best evenings in edibles and enjoyment was 
had at the reception of the boys who had re-enlisted for three 
more years. 

George Blank, Company B and William Thomas, Com- 
pany C both drummer boys of the Twenty-third were 
captured near Stone House Mountain in September, 1863, by 
Mosby, while outside the lines foraging ; thev were sent to 
various rebel prisons and finally reached Danville. At this 
place a hole was cut in the stockade and Thomas, with Har- 
lan S. Howard, Third Wisconsin Battery, and Samuel Street, 
Fifteenth U. S. Infantry, started for the North. Thev were 
about a month getting into our lines, coming in at Favette- 
ville, West Virginia ; they had changed clothes with the 
contrabands, so they looked like Johnnies. Our troops took 
good care of them. Thomas reached Philadelphia in time 
to go back with the veterans who had re enlisted, joining his 
company at Johnson's Island. 

Among the snaps while at Johnson's Island, were bunks 
to sleep in, Jimmy and Pete Henry slept in the upper berth 
and as was the custom, had built a shelf to hold a piece 
of candle, bottle of ink, paper, etc One night after lights 
out, a scuffle was heard with screams of " murder ; get a light, 
lie cut my throat." The boys scrambled out of their bunks to 
where the trouble was and when a light was struck, found 
Pete standing with hands around his neck saying that Jimmy 
had cut his throat, but upon close examination it was found 
he was covered with ink, the sequel being that Jimmy, who 
was given to walking in his sleep, had dreamed he was 
captured and in his struggle to gel away, lie had grabbed 
Pete and securing a bottle of ink began to cut his throat. 
Pete awaking and with the lluid splashing around his neck 
and lace and the gurgling as it (lowed out of the bottle, 
thought his time had come and in his struggle to save his 
life fell off the bunk, thinking his throat was cut. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 159 



NortK Anna and Cold Harbor Campaign. 

CAPTAIN MARCH ANT, Twenty-third Pennsylvania, in 
1861, gave the men of his company special instructions 
as to the use of the turnaque in case of a wound to stop 
the flow of blood until given aid by the surgeon. He was 
killed at Cold Harbor, and when found, he had first been 
wounded in the thigh and had applied the turnaque with his 
twisted pocket handkerchief, but was afterwards riddled with 
balls. He was a most gallant soldier and a true gentleman, 
highly respected by all. 

While lying in the trenches, at Cold Harbor, a shell ex- 
ploded and killed two men of the Twenty-third Pennsylvania. 
A piece of the same shell struck John Patton of Company A 
in the sole of his foot, stinging him severely, not even breaking 
the leather ; he limped around for a while and on a long march 
would go lame. After the war he complained of severe pain 
in the sole of the foot, and in 189S, to save his life, his leg was 
amputated. 

William B. Chadwick, of G Company, Twenty-third Penn- 
sylvania, was badly wounded at Cold Harbor and lay until the 
night of the 3d, the fire being so incessant, as to make it a dan- 
gerous undertaking to attempt to bring him in. Finally, 
Gerald McHenry, of D Company, one of the pickets volun- 
teered, and crawling out placed him on his back, and carried 
him into the line, thus saving Chadwick's life. McHenry had 
won a medal of honor, but the poor fellow was shot the next 
day and died of his wounds July 5, HS64. 

John Moore, Company E, Twenty-third Pennsylvania, 
had the crown of his cap shot away in the action at Fair Oaks, 
doing him no injury. While at Dovvnsville, Maryland, he was 
detailed to the Eighth New York Battery, rejoining his com- 
pany and regiment in May, 1864, and was killed at Cold 
Harbor. 



160 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



In the Field Hospital at Cold Harbor, Dan Williams, one 
of the drummers of K Company, Twenty third Pennsylvania, 
who was assisting Doctor Roller in the care of the wounded, 
saved the leg of James Donnelly of his company. When he 

was brought in, after examina- 
tion by one of the surgeons, a 
green ribbon was tied to the 
buttonhole of his blouse ; this 
meant amputation of the leg. 
Watching his chance Dan took 
the ribbon off and Donnelly 
was passed by. Williams took 
special care of him to prevent 
blood poisoning. In a few days 
he was sent North, and recov- 
ering rejoined his regiment 
and was mustered out at the 
end of the war. As Dan 
says, Donnelly had been good 
and kind to him when he 
joined the company— - he was one of the Twenty-third — and if 
he could save his leg he was going to take the chances. 




FRANK MAGUIGAN, 

Sergeant-Major. 



Frank Worth, color sergeant of the Twenty-third, was 
wounded in the head and both legs in the charge at Cold 
Harbor. Notwithstanding his severe wounds he was solicitous 
for the safetv of the colors, and finally they were taken by one 
of the boys. He lay between the lines close to the Confederate 
breastworks until night, when a squad of Johnnies came out 
and carried him into their line, going through him for every- 
thing he had. One of them tried to kill him with his bayonet, 
but a lieutenant interfered and saved his life. He was entirely 
helpless, or else the Johnnie who tried to kill him would have 
had quite a contract on his hands. 



Aleck Powell, the First Sergeant of F Company, Twenty- 
third Pennsylvania, when the roll was called after the charge 
at Cold Harbor, was among the missing. During the truce to 
bury the dead, John Carrigan of the company, one of the detail, 
came in with a first sergeant's sash and pocket knife and it 
was supposed to be Powell's. He was marked killed, and his 



PENNSYLVANIA \'< >LUNTEER INFANTRY 



Mil 



father and mother were notified at Philadelphia. They held 
a mock funeral at the little church in Germantown, his father 
afterwards collecting his pay accounts to date of death. The 
following' July the Sixth Corps was ordered into the Shenan- 
doah Valley. Carrigan who supposed he had buried Powell 
was on wagon guard, which was corralled by Mosby and was 
held as a prisoner of war until all were released at Ander- 
sonville. Passing around among' the prisoners, he came across 
Powell, to whom he explained how he had buried him and 
his people had mourned him for dead. Powell told how he had 
crossed the works and was shot, falling into the rebel trenches, 
where he was captured. On reaching home, his identity was 
established and he was discharged on April 27, 1865, to date 
from September 8, 1S64, the expiration of his term of service. 

When the armv crossed the James, the regiment was put 
aboard the transport Cauliflower. On the upper deck was a 
skylight. Looking down through it, they found a contraband 
c< >( iking some ham for the offi- 
cers' mess. Being short of 
rations they conceived a plan to 
get the ham ; they tried to get 
the cook to open the door but 
he was instructed to keep it 
closed. They then unscrewed 
the skylight and had one of the 
drummer boys, with two caps, 
ready to be lowered down by 
the feet, to grab the ham. One 
of the boys began pounding 
on the door exciting the cook, 
who turned round with the 
words, "Go away, dah, stop 
you nosin." Quickly the sky- 
light was opened, and the 
drummer lowered down by the heels grabbed the pan, and was 
soon up on deck. When the cook turned around he found the 
pan missing, and rushing out of the room, met one of the offi- 
cers who asked what was the matter. " 'Fore God, boss, I was 
frying dat ham, the boys was pesterin' me, and when I turned 
round to tend to de ham, the ham and pan clean done gone." 




H. M. DAVENPORT, 
Co. A. 



162 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD RECIMENT 



Petersburg — Fort Stevens and Shenandoah 

Valley Campaign 

1864 

AFTER the affair at Fort Stevens the Sixth Corps followed 
Earlv up the Shenandoah Valley and as he was on his 
way back to Richmond, the corps came back to Washington. 
While awaiting transports to Petersburg the corps was paid 
off, everybody going into the city. One of the adventures of 
the visitation to Washington after being paid off, was that of a 
lieutenant and eight men of the Twenty-third Pennsylvania 
making up a pass for a sergeant and men. Buying a long 
nankeen duster, to cover up the officer's uniform, they struck 
for the town, being hailed several times by the provost guard, 
who examined the pass and found it correct. About 4 P. M. one 
of the officers of the provost advised them, that if they wanted 
to stay in the city after sun-down, they had better have the pass 
countersigned by the Provost Marshal. Selecting Joe Atkinson 
to face the music, they started for the Marshal's office, where 
thev all sat down on the curb-stone opposite, while Atkinson 
got in line with the natty sergeants from the fortifications, who 
were having the passes countersigned for their commands. He 
soon came out shaking the pass stating that when it came his 
turn the Marshal questioned him very closely and suggested it 
was strange that he should be sent to have a pass countersigned. 
Joe, in his bland way, explained to the satisfaction of the Pro- 
vost, that the corps had orders to move at daylight the next 
day, and the seal was affixed. This made it good for all 
hours of the night, so the boys took in the Louisiana Varieties 
and other places of amusement. Time and time again, wast lie 
pass examined and found " O. K." About daylight they struck 
for cam]), in time to go along with the corps. 

Joe Smith, of Company A, Twenty-third Pennsylvania, 
was shaving Sergeant-Major Frank Maguigan, one day in the 
Shenandoah Valley, when the Rebs suddenly charged and 
drove the pickets in. The boys, in rall\ ing, stole Sniithey's 
razor and for ten days Maguigan had to go around with one 
side of his face shaved, as nobody could find a razor, and there 
wasn't a barber shop within 50 miles. 



164 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



After the fight at Fort Stevens, Jubal Early retreated up 
the Shenandoah Valley, followed by the Sixth Corps until 
thev were recalled to go back to Petersburg. Early finding 
the Sixth Corps was on its way to rejoin the Army of the 

Potomac, turned and drove 
Crook out of the valley. Gen- 
eral Grant then decided to 
clean the valley out, and pre- 
vent further attempts of in- 
vasion of the North, so he sent 
Sheridan with his cavalry to 




WM. GREEN, 
Serireant Co. F. 



take charge of all the troops, 
consisting of the Cavalry 
Corps, Sixth Corps under 
General Wright ; the Eight 
Corps, under General Crook, 
and the Nineteenth Corps 
under General Emroy, he con- 
centrating them at Charles 
town.Va., General Jubal Early 
commanding the Confederate forces concentrating his troops 
at Winchester, Va. 

Both armies were about evenly matched, each having 
about 36,000 infantry, cavalry and artillery. There was march- 
ing and countermarching, advance and counter advance, then a 
demonstration and fall back from Winchester to Harper's 
Ferry. These movements were received with great discontent at 
the North. The campaign for the Presidential election being 
near at hand, gold rising higher and higher, President Lincoln 
became uneasy and wrote Grant one of his wisest letters. 
These mutterings caused Grant to visit Sheridan at Charles- 
town, with the intention of giving him a plan of battle, but 
he found Sheridan so ready to move that he gave no plan or 
order whatever, except the authority to " Go in." 

Sheridan, had been feeling the enemy to demonstrate 
what forces he was about to contend with, as conflicting 
reports were coming in from his scouts, such as divisions 1 ic- 
ing sent back to Lee ; that Longstreet's Corps was on its way 
to Early, asked General Crook, Commander of the Eighth 
Corps, who had campaigned in the Shenandoah Valley 
and knew most all its people, il there \\;is not someone in 



Pennsylvania \'( ilunteer infantry. 



Hi.", 



Winchester from whom they could get reliable information. 
Crook suggested Miss Rebecca 1. Wright a young Ouaker 
lady residing in Winchester. She was ;i staunch I'nion 
woman and will ever be known as the Loyal (ml of Winches- 
ter. She was then teaching a 
very small school at their home, 
where she resided with her 
mother and sister, who was a 
most intense sympathizer of 
the Confederacy, her old father, 
having died while a prisoner of 
war in Confederate hands. 

The chief of scouts who 
was sent by General Sheridan 
to find some one to deliver a let- 
ter to Becky Wright, brought 
a colored man to Sheridan's 
headquarters, who after ques- 
tioning him as to how he was 
to get into the town, gave him 
the following letter : 

September 15, 1864. 

I learn from Major-General Crook that you are a loyal lady and 
still love the flag. 

Can you inform me of the position of Early's forces, the number 
of divisions in his army, and the strength of all or any of them, and 
his probable or reported intentions. Have any more troops arrived 
from Richmond or are any more coming, or reported to be coming ? 
I am very repectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

P. H. Sheridan, 
.Major-General Commanding. 
You can trust the bearer. 




LOYAL GIRL OF WINCHESTER, 
Rebecca Wright, now Bonsall. 



She states that about noon of September 16th, as her 
four scholars were dismissed, her mother answering a knock 
at the door found a colored man, who asked for Miss Wright. 
As there were two Misses Wright, she wanted to know which 
one and he replied, "Miss Becky." As he passed into the front 
room, where she was and which was used as her schoolroom, 



L66 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



he locked the door and holding up his hand, said "don't be 
alarmed Miss Becky, I have a dispatch from General Sheridan," 
and pulling it out of his mouth, wrapped in tin foil handed it 
to her with the remark that he knew she would answer it and 
he would call for the answer at 3 o'clock and be sure to wrap 
it in the tin foil again so he could carry it in his mouth. When he 
was gone, she was so surprised and alarmed, she did not know 
how to act, thinking perhaps it was some trick of the Con- 
federates to get her into trouble, as she had been held under 
a cloud for three years being in sympathy with the Union 
cause. 

After reading the letter she went to consult her mother, 

what best to do, who wanting 
to know if she had the informa- 
tion, and being told yes, re- 
marked, " Well, no doubt, you 
can trust the colored man." 

It so happened that there 
was a Confederate officer, 
wounded and convalescent, 
boarding with one of her neigh- 
bors, and two evenings before 
had made a call at the house. 
The}-, of course, entertained 
him, and during the evening 
here the conversation turned 
upon the war, and more espec- 
ially the state of affairs directly 
around them. He described 
the situation from his standpoint, how many troops they had 
and what they most relied upon, she asking questions without 
any purpose except to keep up the conversation and he answer- 
ing freely, so that when the colored man returned, she gave 
him the information, number of troops, their situations and the 
fact that some had been called oil for services elsewhere, in 
fact, just what Sheridan wanted to know and expressed regrets 
that she could not give more information, but would try to 
gather more for him, if he would send the messenger hack in 
a day or two. 

Tin; colored man placed the note wrapped in tin foil in 
his month and left the house, all dav Saturdav and Sundav 




GEORGE CRAWF' 
Co. D. 



P] WSVI.VAMA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



L67 



she wondered what had become of the messenger and what 
would be the result of her note. 

When on Monday, the 19th, she was awakened at dav- 
light by the booming of cannon, her first thought was whether 
her note had anything to do with it. It was a terrible battle 
all day long, they taking refuge in the cellar. As the rumbling 
of the battle grew fainter and fainter, she went to the first 
floor, could see nothing but the wounded and stragglers pass- 
ing along the streets, nothing from the second floor, but from 
the garret window, she saw the old American Flag coming into 
the town. She dropped on her knees and offered a most 
fervent prayer, and running down stairs, calling out the 
Yankees are coming. Soon 
was heard clattering of sabres 
on the doorstep and as she 
opened the door in the 
twilight, she saw two officers, 
one of whom she recognized 
as General Crook, who intro- 
duced her to the other, Gen- 
eral Sheridan. He warmly 
shook her by the hand, ask- 
ing her if she was Becky 
Wright, telling her it was 
upon her information that he 
fought the battle, thanking 
her earnestly, saying he 
would never forget her cour- 
age and patriotism. She 
begged of him never to speak of it as her life would be in 
danger when the Union troops went away. Sheridan replied, 
that the Confederates would never come back, and passing into 
the school room, wrote on her desk the following despatch to 
Secretary Stanton : 

"We have just sent the rebels whirling through Win- 
chester, and are after them to-morrow." The country was 
electrified, gold took a tumble. As Grant said : Sheridan 
was entitled to all the credit for his great victory. It es- 
tablished him in the confidence of the President and Secretary 
of War, as a commander to be trusted in the management of 
troops under him. Before that, while they highly appreciated 




JOSEPH \nd WM. McKINNEY, 
Co. E. 



168 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



him as a commander to execute, they felt a little nervous about 
giving him too much discretion. His army fought the battles 
of Opequan or Winchester, Fisher Hill and Cedar Creek, de- 
stroying Early's army, and ever after closing the Shenandoah 
Valley as a highway to the invasion of the North. 

Miss Wright continued 
to live quietly in Winchester, 
until 1867. No one suspected 
her; they knew nothing of the 
matter, until she received the 
following letter from General 
Sheridan. 

"Headquarters 
Department of Gulf, 

"New Orleans, 
January 7, 1867. 
" My dear Miss Wright : 

"You are probably not aware 
of the service you rendered the 
Union cause by the information 
you sent me by the colored man a 
few days before the Opequan on 
September 19, 1864. It was on 
this information the battle was fought and probably won. The col- 
ored man gave the note rolled up in tin foil to the scout, who 
awaited him at Millwood. 

"The colored man had carried it in his mouth to that point, and 
delivered it to the scout, who brought it to me. By this note I be- 
came aware of the true condition of affairs, inside of the enemy's lines, 
and gave directions for the attack. 

"I will always remember this courageous and patriotic action of 
yours with gratitude, and beg you to accept the watch and chain 
which I send you by General J. Forsythe as a memento of September 
19, 1864." 




WILLIAM L. UBKK, 
Co. II. 



This letter getting into the Valley papers, most of the 
community were wild with indignation, but the war was over, 
and they could do her no injury, but they showed their dis- 
like in many ways. Finally in 1869 General Grant had her 
appointed to a position in the Treasury Department at 
Washington. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



L69 



Up to the year [891, the colored man that carried the 
despatch, had not been found, although every effort had been 
made to find him. That year the survivors of theSixth Corps, 
dedicated a monumentat Winchester to General David A. Rus- 
sell, who was killed in that action and while there, started a 
search to find the missing colored man. He was found and 
proved to be Tom Laws of Berryville, who in 1864 belonged 
to a Mr. Clarke who resided in Winchester and who was 
privileged to go into the town twice a week with produce 
from his master's farm. He was brought 1 m t< > Washington and 
was finally identified by Mrs. Bonsall (Miss Wright) who took 
him to the War Department and took affidavit of identity 
which is now on file. At this time the faithful messenger was 78 
years of age, never had lived in a city, and while a position 
was offered him for the balance of his life, he refused, as he 
was then living with his grandchildren and doing well and 
contented. 



When the Twenty-third was on its way home for muster- 
out, many of the boys were riding on top of the freight cars. 
As they neared Philadelphia 
below Gray's Ferry Bridge, 
James McGinnis of Company 
G was accidentally killed by 
being struck on the head as the 
train passed under a bridge. 
What a sad home-coming it 
was to his people who awaited 
him at the depot ! 

The citizens of Philadelphia 
who had been supplying the 
troops en route to Washington 
in order to provide for their 
better entertainment organized 
May 26, 1 86 1. The Cooper 
Shop Volunteer Refreshment 
Committee, opened a saloon in 
the cooper shop of the Cooper Brothers, Prime street (now 
Washington Avenue) below Front street, and a similar organi- 
zation, the Union Volunteer Refreshment Saloon, was opened 
on May 27, 1 86 1 in a boat shop and riggers' office S. W. Cor. 




RICHARD A. GRIFFITH, 
Lieutenant Co. D. 



170 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



Prime (now Washington Avenue) and Swanson streets. These 
places of entertainment could provide 2,500 at one setting and 
had facilities to ration 30,000 daily. This generous hospitality 
was maintained during the four years of the war. At all hours 

of the day and night the fire 
bells of the neighborhood 
would bring the people to 
these saloons to care for the 
soldiers passing through the 
city. Formal expressions of 
thanks were extended by the 
President of the United States, 
Governors of the States of 
Maine, New Hampshire, Ver- 
mont, Connecticut, Massachus- 
etts, Rhode Island, New York, 
New Jersey and Pennsylvania 
for their liberal hospitality. 
This volunteer work, the free 
gift of its citizens, gave to 
Philadelphia a national reputation for patriotism and hospi- 
tality. 




AM IRE W J. ALBANY. 
Corporals, C 



The following members of the Twenty-third Pennsylvania 
were honored by promotion in other commands: Colonel 
David B. Bimey was promoted to Brigadier General and died 
October, 1S64, while Major General commanding the Tenth 
Army Corps; Colonel Thomas H. Neill promoted to Brigadier 
General commanding a brigade in Sixth Army Corps; Colonel 
John Ely promoted to Brigadier General United States Vol- 
unteers, commanding brigade in Veteran Reserve Corps; Major 
George C. Spear was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel Sixty-first 
Pennsylvania and was killed while Colonel commanding same 
regiment at Marye's Heights, May 3, 1S63; Lieutenant John 
W. Crosby Company A was promoted to Captain in Sixty-first 
Pennsylvania, wounded at Fort Stevens and killed while Lieu- 
tenant Colonel commanding the Sixty-first Pennsylvania at the 
assault of lines at Petersburg, April 2, 1865; Arthur F. Keene, 
Lieutenant Company B was promoted to First Lieutenant 
Company I Eighty-second Pennsylvania; Captain Geo. 
\Y. Mindil was promoted to Colonel of the Thirty third New 



PENNSYLVANIA V< >LUNTEER INFANTRY. 



171 



Jersey and Brevet Major General United States Volunteers; 
Captain Win. ("lark Company E was promoted Major of 
the Eighty-second Pennsylvania; Sergeant Stephen Palmore 
Company H promoted to Captain Company I Eighty- 
second Pennsylvania; Sergeant Casper Miller, Company F 
promoted to First Lieutenant Company E Eighty-second 
Pennsylvania, Lieutenant Henry G. Fritsch was promoted to 
Captain Company F Eighty-second Pennsylvania; Captain 
James Gwyn Company F, commissioned Lieutenant Colo- 
nel One Hundred and Eighteenth Pennsylvania promoted to 
Colonel, wounded at Wilderness and discharged at close of 
war Brevet Brigadier General and Brevet Major General United 
States Volunteers; First Sergeant William R. Peddle Company 
B was commissioned Lieutenant One Hundred and Fifty- 
seventh Pennsylvania promoted to Captain, wounded at Peb- 
ble's Farm 1864; Sergeant Charles M. Young Company F com- 
missioned Second Lieutenant One Hundred and Eighteenth 
Pennsylvania, promoted to Captain, killed at Chapin Farm 
1864; Private Albert Walters, Companv B commissioned 
Second Lieutenant Companv K One Hundred and Eigh- 
teenth Pennsylvania, discharged as Brevet Major; Sergeant 
John Reen Company G pro- 
moted Captain Companv K 
Eighty-second Pennsylvania ; 
Second Lieutenant Frank 
Taylor Company G promoted 
to Captain Company H 
Eighty- second Pennsylvania, 
wounded Sailor's Creek; Lieu- 
tenant James H. House, Com- 
pany G promoted to First 
Lieutenant Company H 
Eighty-second Pennsylvania; 
Sergeant George P. Mitchell, 
Company D promoted Sec- 
ond Lieutenant Company H 
Eighty-second Pennsylvania; 
Sergeant Wm. H. Myers, Company I promoted First Lieu- 
tenant Company K Eighty-second Pennsylvania, killed at 
Sailor's Creek, April 6, 1865; First Sergeant Russell P. How- 
ard, Company I promoted Second Lieutenant Company K 




DAVID COLVILLE, 
Sergeant Co. F. 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



Eighty-second Pennsylvania ; Corporal John McKernon Com- 
pany A promoted Second Lieutenant Company F Eighty-sec- 
ond Pennsylvania, died April iS, 1865, of wounds received at 
Petersburg, April 2, 1865. 

One of the most patriotic bodies who rallied to the sup- 
port of the government during the Civil War was the Philadel- 
phia Fire Department, nearly all its members, or adherents of 
its companies enlisted in the army or navy, they being repre- 
sented in every regiment that was recruited in the city, as well 
as bv marines and sailors on board vessels that were fitted out 
at the old navy yard, at the foot of Federal street. 

The Hibernia Engine Company that stood on Evelina 

street, (now Locust street) 
below Third, seeing the neces- 
sity for service at the Capitol, 
in the protection of the arch- 
ives of the government, vol- 
untarily extended their ser- 
vice, which was accepted and 
with men and apparatus, was 
stationed in Washington dur- 
ing the entire war ; those who 
remained at home, inaugu- 
rated a volunteer ambulance 
service and were very active 
in conveying the sick and 
wounded soldiers from the 
depots to the hospitals. These 
ambulances were large and 
comfortable, being works of art as to construction and finish. 
Each fire company, with that proverbial pride, vied with each 
other to have the finest. They were built, manned, equipped 
and operated without charge, being backed up by the volunteer 
contributions of the friends and ladies in their respective neigh- 
borhoods. The following companies housed these ambu- 
lances : 

ENGINE COMPANIES. 

Delaware, Southwark, Washington, Weccacoe, Diligent, 
Philadelphia (2), Assistance, America, Fairmount, Northern 
Liberty, United States, Vigilant, Good Intent, Globe, Mechanic, 




JAMES McGINNIS, 
Co. E. Regimental Marker. 



PENNSYLVANIA V< ILUNTEER INFANTRY. 



ITS 



Decatur, Fellowship (2), Monroe, Good Will 12), West Phila- 
delphia. 

Hi >SE COMPANIES. 

Franklin, Hope, Southwark, Western, Philadelphia, Good 
Will, Neptune, Cohocksink, Kensington, Independence, North- 
ern Liberty, West Philadelphia. 

In 1864, during the great Sanitary Fair, held at Logan 
Square, 18th and Race streets, for the benefit of the Sanitary 
Commission, a patriotic body, that looked after the welfare of 
the sick and wounded soldiers, in which over a million of dol- 
lars was realized, the firemen took quite an interest. Among 
the manv ventures was a contest for a fire horn, manv of the 




AMBULANCE. 
Good Will Engine Co. 

boys in the service sending home their mite, for votes of their 
favorite company, the winner being the Good Will Engine 
Company, Race street, below Broad street. 

Upon the return of the regiments at the close of the war, 
nearly all were received and welcomed home by a parade of 
the fire companies and it was generally quite a long route, as 
they wanted to take their guests through each neighborhood, 
so they could spring their bells and have their ladies — God 



174 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 




ROBERT BOYD, 

Co. I. 



bless them — who worked so hard while the boys were away, join 
in the welcome as " Johnnie Came Marching Home." We are 
pleased to note that nearly all the ninety-seven volunteer fire 
companies of Philadelphia had representatives in the field and 

staff and rank and file of the 
Twenty-third Pennsylvania. 

The Twenty-third Pennsyl- 
vania had the honor to serve 
in the following commands dur- 
ing its three months' service : 
General George H. 
Thomas' Brigade, General 
George Cachvallader's Divi- 
sion, General Robert Patter- 
son's Army, General YYinfield 
Scott, Commander-in-Chief. It 
was present at Falling Waters, 
participating in the campaigns 
of that army, and during its 
three years' service in the Army 
of the Potomac was in General L. Pike Graham's Brigade, Gen- 
eral Don Carlos Buell's Division and upon the formation of the 
Army Corps, it was assigned to General Abercrombie's Brig- 
ade, General Darius N. Couch Division, General Erastmus 
I). Keyes, Fourth Corps, Army of the Potomac, General 
George B. McClellan, commanding. When this Corps was 
divided, its division, Couch's, continued with the Army of the 
Potomac. When the Sixth Corps was organized it became 
part of the hirst Brigade, General John Cochrane, Third Div- 
ision, General John Newton, Sixth Corps, General Win, F. 
Smith, thence First Brigade, General Alexander Shaler, Third 
Division, General Henry D. Terry, Sixth Corps, General John 
Sedgwick, thence Fourth Brigade, Colonel Nelson Cross, First 
Division, General David A. Russell, Sixth Corps, General 
Horatio ( ',. Wright. 

The Fourth Corps, while the Twenty-third served in it, 
was composed of Couch's, Smith's and Casey's Divisions. 
On May i8, [862, General Smith's Division was detached and 
assigned to the Sixth Corps, then being organized. The 
regiment participated while in this Corps on the Peninsula 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER IMAM RY. 



i;:> 



campaign, in the actions of Warwick Court House or York- 
town, Williamsburg, Fair Oaks, While Oak Swamp, Charles 
City Cross Roads, Turkey Bend and Malvern Hill and was 
present at second Malvern Hill. When the army abandoned the 
Peninsula, the Fourth Corps was divided, Couch's Division 
continuing with the Army of the Potomac as an independent 
division and was present at Chantilly. While the division 
was present at the action of South Mountain and Antietam 
the regiment was on detached duty guarding the fords at the 
mouth of the Monocacy, where Lee had crossed the Potomac. 
Alter the Antietam campaign, Couch's Division entire was 
assigned to the Sixth Corps, becoming the Third Division, 
General John Newton, commanding, General Couch being 
promoted to the command of the Second Corps, General 
Franklin being promoted to command of the Left Grand 
Division, composed of the Sixth Corps and hirst Corps, and 
General Win. M. Smith (Baldy) promoted to the command of 
die Sixth Corps. The regiment participated with the Corps 
at Fredericksburg, Marye's Heights, Salem Church, Gettys- 
burg, Funkstown, Rappahan- 
nock Station and Mine Run. 
Alter the Gettysburg cam 
paign the division was com- 
manded by General Henry 
D. Terry. 

In March, 1864, the old 
Third Divison was broken up, 
the brigade now commanded 
by General Shaler was trans- 
ferred to the First Division, 
General Horatio G. Wright ; 
the other two brigades were 
assigned to the Second Divi- 
sion, while the Third Division 
of the Third Corps, which was 
broken up, took its place as 
the Third Division, General 
Ricketts, of the Sixth Corps. The regiment was on detached 
duty from January to May, 1864, when it rejoined the armv, 
participating with the Fourth Brigade ; Colonel Nelson Cross, 
First Division ; General David B. Russell, Sixth Corps ; 




CHARLES F. HUBEK, 
Corporal Co. A. 



L76 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 




General Horatio G. Wright, in the actions at North Anna, Han- 
overtown, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, until July 9, 1864, Fort 
Stevens, D. C, and Shenandoah Valley campaign until Aug- 
ust, 1864, when ordered home for muster out. 

The original Fourth Corps, during the short period of its 

existence, made a most gallant 
record, its two divisions, 
Casey's and Couch's, bore the 
brunt of the righting at Fair 
Oaks, while its Couch's Divi- 
sion was the left centre of that 
hard fought battle at Malvern 
Hill, where it withstood the re- 
peated assaults of some of the 
best divisions in the Army of 
Northern Virginia. 

The record of the Sixth 
Corps was a most brilliant one. 
It took Crampton's Pass in the 
South Mountain fight, swept 
the heights at Marye's, took 
everything in sight at Rappa- 
hannock Station, was in the deadly fighting in the Wilderness, 
crossed the works to the enemy's second line at Spottsylvania, 
saved the national capital at Fort Stevens, assisted in clearing 
the Shenandoah Valley out in the actions at Opequan or 
Winchester, Fisher Hill and Cedar Creek, crossed the works 
at Petersburg, April 2, 1 865, sweeping right and left within 
the lines, with Sheridan's Cavalry crushed Lee's rear at Sailor's 
Creek, April 7, 1865, capturing 7000 of the enemy. After the 
surrender of Lee, it was detached from the army and sent to help 
do up Johnson. When they reached Danville, found that 
Sherman had completed that work, and were ordered to Wash- 
ington for the grand review, arriving too late to take part in that 
grand event, so thev had a special review of their own. General 
Walker, the historian of the Second Corps, calls the wearers of 
the Greek Cross, the old Guard of the Army, while Colonel 
Win. I ; . Fox, who sewed in the Twelfth Corps, historian of 
regimental 1< isses, Civil War, has this ti 1 say: " The history ol the 
Sixth Corps, more than any other is replete with fascinating 
interest. Its record is invested with more of the romance and 



DAVID n. i in: k . 

Co. H. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



brilliancy of war, while its veteran legions wrought deeds 
which linked the badge of the Corps, the Greek Cross, with an 
unfading glory and renown." 

All survivors of the old Sixth Corps, no doubt, would if 
they had the opportunity, take off their hats for their kind 
tributes. 

The Army of the Potomac, of which the regiment was 
part, was commanded by General George B. McClellan from 
its organization until November, 1862, then by General Am- 
brose E. Burnside to 1863 ; then by General Joseph Hooker until 
June, 1863 ; then by General George G. Meade until its 
muster out in 1865. The Commander-in-Chief of the United 
States armies during that period was General Winfield Scott 
in 1 86 1, General Hallack to May, 1864, and General U. S. Grant 
to the close of the war. 

The original brigade in which the Twentv-third Penn- 
sylvania served was composed of the Sixty-first Pennsylvania, 
Eighty-second (or Thirty-first Pennsylvania), Sixty-fifth (The 
Chasseurs), Sixty-seventh (First Long Island) — September, 
1862, — the One Hundred and 
Twenty-second New York was 
added while the brigade was 
bivouacked at Ofutt's Cross 
Roads on the Maryland Cam- 
paign. Upon the reorganiza- 
tion of the army under General 
Hooker in 1863, the Sixty-first 
Pennsylvania was detached as 
part of the Light Brigade, and 
ever afterwards remained in 
the Third Brigade of the Sec- 
ond Division, Sixth Corps. 
Upon the reorganization of 
the army in 1864 the One 
Hundred and Twenty-second 
New York was transferred to 
the Third Brigade of the Second Division, Sixth Corps, where 
they remained until muster out. Upon the reorganization of 
the army in 1865, the Sixty-fifth New York was transferred 
to the Second Brigade, First Division, Sixth Corps, so on the 
final campaign the old brigade regiments were separated, the 




CHARLES HOGG, 
Co. D. 



17s 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



Eighty-second Pennsylvania being assigned to the Third 
Brigade, Sixth Corps. 

In the early davs of the brigade there was more or less 
trouble until the field service began, when they became the 

best of friends. When the 
original term of service ex- 
pired, the veterans and re- 
cruits of the Twenty-third 
Pennsylvania were trans- 
ferred to the Eighty-second 
Pennsylvania, while those of 
the Sixty-seventh New York 
were transferred to the Sixty- 
fifth New York. It is said 
that the Sixty-fifth New York 
(The Chasseurs) had the 
honor of being the last regi- 
ment of volunteers to be mus- 
tered out. While the other 
regiments of the brigade 
served in two divisions of the 
Corps, the One Hundred and Twenty-second New York had 
the honor to wear the three colors of the Greek Cross, having 
served in all three divisions of the Sixth Corps, the Sixty-first 
being entitled to wear the colors of the Third Division, Light 
Division, and Second Division, blue, green, and white. 

The brigade as an organization came together but once 
since the close of the war, the occasion being the dedication of 
their monuments at Culp's Hill, Gettysburg, in 1888. The re- 
union was a most pleasant one. 




PATRICK HICKEY, WM. J. WRAV, 
Co. F. Blanket mates, wounded by same hall. 




*fe 



FIELD AND STAFF AT MUSTER OUT. 

MAJ. HENRY REESE, Jr. 



LIEUT.-COL. W.J. WALLACE QMR. J. D. CHANDLER. 

COL. JOHN F. GLENN. 
ADJ. THOS. K. BOGGS. SURGEON \VM. C. ROLLER 



CHAP. REV. J. G. SHINN. 
179 



180 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



ROLL OF THOSE WHO DIED IN SERVICE 

FIELD AND STAFF 



Maj. General 

Major . . . 

Surgeon . . 
Serg't Major 
Band. . . . 



David B. Birney. Died Dec. 13, 186.4, while in command of 

10th Army Corps. 
George C. Spear. Killed at Marye's Heights May 3, 1S63, 

while Colonel 61st Pa. Infantry. 
Owen Stille. Died June 22, 1862. 
Ira Webster. Killed at Cold Harbor June 1, 1S64. 
Benjamin Walton. Died August 10, 1862. 



COMPANY A 

Lieutenant . . John W. Crosby. Killed at Petersburg April 2, 1865, while 

Colonel 61st Pa. Infantry. 
Sergeant . . . Theo. Bisbing. Died December, 1861. 
Corporal. . . Sol. Forebaugh. Killed at Fair Oaks May 31, 1862. 

John McKernon. Killed at Petersburg April 2, 1865, while 2d 
Lieutenant Co. F, S2d Pa. Infantry. 

Caleb Brickman. Died at Washington, D. C, Nov. 30, 1861. 
Private. . . . Edward C. Andrews. Died at Johnson's Island February, 1S64. 

Peter Born. Killed at Cold Harbor, June 1, 1864. 

William Boyd. Killed at Cold Harbor June 1, 1864. 

John Degroot. Died at Washington, D. C, Dec 24, 1861. 

Harry P. Endress. Killed at Fair Oaks May 31, 1S62. 

James Kilpatrick. Killed at Cold Harbor June 1, 1N64. 

Frederick Knocke. Died at Washington, D. C, Dec. 19, 1861. 

J. C. McLawlin. Died August 20, 1862, of wounds received at 
Fair Oaks May 31, 1862. 

Edward McDonough. Died of wounds received at Fair Oaks 
May 31, 1S62. 

John Newcamp. Killed at Cold Harbor June 1, 1864. 

Wm. F. Wills. Killed at Cold Harbor June 1, 1864. 



COMPANY B 

Lieutenant. . Joshua S. Garsed. Killed at Gettysburg July 3, 1863. 

Corporal . . . Max Lakemeyer. Killed at Cold Harbor, June 1, 1864. 

" ... Thomas Habbermaker. Killed at Winchester Sept. 19, 1S64. 

Private .... David Boyd. Killed at Fair < >.iks May 31, 1862. 

" .... Michael Divine. Died September 9, 1862. 

" .... Robert P. Can. Killed at Cold Harbor June I, 1S64. 

" .... Thomas J. Graham. Died while prisoner of war at Harrison- 
burg, Va., September, 1862. 

" .... Byron E. Keyser. Accidentally killed at Washington, D. C. , 
February, 1862. 
.... Wm. J. Kilpatrick. Killed at Cold Harbor June 1, [864. 



PENNSYLVANIA \ < 'I.I 1NTEER INFANTRY 



isl 



Private. . . . Andrew Lang. Died York Hospital, Pa., November. 1864. 
Philip Moltzie. Killed Mine Run November 31, 1863. 
Thomas II McCann. Killed Fair Oaks May 31. 1S62. 
John McConnell. Died at Washington. D. C, October, 1861. 
Henry Rnoff. Died at Falmouth, Y.i.. February 15, 1863. 

..<■ W. Smith. Died at Washington. D. C, Dec, 1861. 
John F. Weber. Killed Fair Oaks June 1, 1862. 
Henry Weber. Died Washington, D. C, December, 1861. 



COMPANY C 

Sergeant. . . John C. Ames. Died June 18, 1864, of wounds received at Cold 
Harbor; buried at Alexandria, Va. ; grave2i72. 
John Don Carlisle. Died at Portsmouth June 26, 1S62. 
Corporal . . . John E. Little. Killed at Cold Harbor June 1, 1864. 
John Matherson. Killed at Cold Harbor June 1, 1S64. 
Albert G. Russell. Killed at Cold Harbor June 1, 1S64. 
Private.. . . Edward Baxter. Killed at Marye's Heights May 3, 1863. 
Levi Campbell. Killed Cold Harbor June 1, 1S64. 
Thomas Earner. Died at Washington, D. C, Jan., 1862. 
James Garrigan. Killed at Cold Harbor, June 1, 1*64. 
Thomas Gallagher. Killed at Cold Harbor June 1, 1864. 
James Henry. Died while prisoner of war at Salisbury, N. C, 

1864. 
Charles E. Hayes. Died at Camp Graham January, 1S62. 
Jacob Keith. Killed Cold Harbor June 1, 1S64. 
James Mullen. Killed Cold Harbor June 1, 1864. 
U'ni. Maguire. Died at Eibby Prison of wounds received at 

Cold Harbor June 1, 1864. 
Thomas McCoughel. Died June 9, 1S62 ; buried Cypress 
Cemetery, Long Island, N. Y. 

Died Alexandria, Va., December 15, 1862. 
Died at Andersonville, Ga., April 28, 1S64 ; 



John McCusker. 
R. McDonald, 
grave 773. 
James Pringle. 
Jacob Urban. 



Killed Marye's Heights May 3, 1862. 
Died Washington, D. C, November 14, 1861 



buried Military Asylum Cemetery. 



COMPANY D 

Lieutenant . . Benj. S. Thomas. Died at Washington, D. C, Feb. 9, 1S62. 

. . John G. Boyd. Killed Cold Harbor June 1, 1S64. 

Corporal . . . Wm. G. Grow. Killed Fair Oaks May 31, 1862. 

. . Wm. Montgomery. Killed Cold Harbor June 1, 1864. 

Private .... Wm. J. Allender. Died Johnson Island, January iS, 1S64. 

... Robert Allison. Killed Fair Oaks May 31, 1862. 

" ... Chas. F. Burnett. Died January 3, 1863 ; buried at Military 

Asylum Cemetery, D. C. 

... Edward Donahue. Killed Fair Oaks May 31, 1862. 

" ... Charles Gallagher. Killed Cold Harbor June 1, 1S64. 

" ... Andrew Keim. Killed Cold Harbor June 1, 1S64. 

" ... Samuel McClane. Killed Fair Oaks May 31, 1862. 



182 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



Private . Gerald McHenry. Died July 6, 1864, of wounds received at 

Cold Harbor ; buried National Cemetery, Arlington, Va. 
. . . Wm. Noble. Killed Fair Oaks, May 31, 1S62. 
. . . Geo. Stephenson. Died at Yorktown, \"a., May 18, 1S62. 
. . . Anthony Winn. Killed Fair Oaks May 31, 1S62. 



Lieutenant 
Sergeant 

Corporal 



Private . 



COMPANY E 

James Johnson. Killed Cold Harbor, June 1, 1S64. 
Robert Gordon. Died Philadelphia, Pa., Januarys, 1862. 
John McNeill. Killed Cold Harbor June 1, 1864. 
John Miller. Died Washington, D. C, Dec. 27, 1861. 
James McClung. Died Washington, D. C, Dec. 25, 1S61. 
Wm. Miller. Died August 16, 1S62, of wounds received at 

Malvern Mill July 1, 1862. 
John Dougherty. Killed Fair Oaks May 31, 1862. 
Wm. S. Davis. Killed Cold Harbor June 1, 1864. 
Jonah Bendle. Died Washington, D. C, February 23, 1862. 
Thomas Brown. Died Bottom Bridge, Ya., May 30, 1S62. 
John A. Burk. Killed Cold Harbor, June 1, 1864. 
George Clark. Killed Fair Oaks, May 31, 1S62. 
John Carroll. Killed Cold Harbor June 1, 1864. 
Robt. Donahue. Died June 8, 1S64, of wounds received at 

Cold Harbor, June 1, 1864. 
Robert Hamilton. Killed front of Petersburg June, 1864. 
John Humes. Killed Cold Harbor, June 1, 1864. 
Wm. Johnson. Killed Cold Harbor June r, 1864. 
George Long. Killed Cold Harbor June 1, 1864. 
John Mone. Killed Cold Harbor June 1, 1864. 
John McGinnis. Killed Fair Oaks May 31, 1862. 
John McYey. Killed Fair Oaks May 31, 1862. 
James Sweeney. Killed Cold Harbor June 1. 1864. 
James Scrowl. Died December 3,1861; buried Military Asylum 

Cemetery, D. C. 
James Scholas. Died December 3, 1861, Washington, D. C. 
John Shelladay. Killed Cold Harbor June 1, 1864. 
Win. Shea. Killed Cold Harbor June 1, 1S64. 
Henry Tate. Died June, 1S62, of wounds received at Fair 

Oaks, May 31, 1S62. 



1 st Sergeant 
Sergeant . 
Private . . 



COMPANY F 

Chas. W. Anderson. I lied February 7, 1S62. 

Frederick Huber. Killed Fair < >aks May 31, (862. 

Charles M. Young. Killed Peebles Farm September 31, 1N64, 

while Captain nNtli Penna. Infantry. 
Wm. S. Bristler. Killed Cold Harbor June 1, [864. 
Samuel Fee. Died October 16, [862; buried Mount Olivet 

Cemetery, Ferderick, Maryland. 
Daniel Graham. Died January 25, [864. 
James Hamilton. Died (from wound received at Cold Harbor 

June 1, 1S64) August 21, 1S64. 



PENNSYLVANIA YOLUNTE1 



INFANTRY. 



L83 



Private . 



William Kilpatrick. Killed P'air i >aks Maj ;,i, 1S62. 

Michael Kennedy. Killed Fair Oaks May 31, 1862. 

Jacob Lewis. Died February 23, [863. 

James McFadden. Killed Sailors' Creek April 6, 1S65, while in 

Company K, N2d Pa. Infantry. 
Thomas McCorkle. Killed Fair c >aks May 31, 1S62. 
John McKissick. Died Andersonville April iS, 1864; grave 605. 
Thomas Koney. Killed Fair Oaks May 31, 1862. 
Zachariah Shaw. Killed Cold Harbor June 1, 1S64. 
E. Thomas. Captured and died at Andersonville August 30, 

1864, of wounds received at Cold Harbor June 1, 1864; 

grave 7250. 
Elias Young. Died F)ecember i, 1861. 



COMPANY G 



Lieutenant 

Sergeant 

Corporal 

Private 



Thomas J. Armstrong. Died January 2, 1864. 

Benton H. Karnes. Killed Cold Harbor June i, 1S64. 

David Applegate. Killed Cold Harbor June 1, 1S64. 

John Hays. Died February, 1S62. 

Win. Muschert. Killed Fair Oaks, May 31. 1S62. 

Samuel Artman. Killed Fair Oaks May 31, 1S62. 

Henry W. Bantom. Died Johnson's Island, January 27, 1S64. 

James Black. Died June 26, 1862. 

James Cuskaden. Died wounds received Malvern Hill July 

1, 1862. 
Wm. H. Clair. Killed Fair Oaks May 31, 1S62. 
James Davenport. Died August 1, 1S62. 
Henry Ernst. Killed Cold Harbor June 1, 1S64. 
George W. Ewell. Killed Cold Harbor June 1, 1864. 
William Graham. Died of wounds received at Cold Harbor. 
Patrick Havey. Killed Winchester September 19, 1864. 
Mathew Hazlett. Killed Fair Oaks May 31, 1S62. 
James McGinnis. Accidentally killed August 25, 1864. 
Harry Stevens. Died January 20, 1862. 
Frederick Summers. Died November 3, 1S61. 
John H. Spencer. Killed Marye's Heights May 3, 1863. 
John T. Wilson. Killed Marye's Heights May 3, 1S63. 
John Yeager. Killed Cold Harbor June 1, 1S64. 



COMPANY H 



Captain . . . James M. Craig. F)ied Feb. 2, '99, of wounds received at 

Cold Harbor, June 1, 1S64. 
Color Serg't . Samuel F. Bolton. Killed Fair ( )aks May 31, 1862. 
Corporal. . . Anthony Schaffer. Died of wounds received at Cold Harbor. 

John Boyle. Killed Malvern Hill July 1, 1S62. 
Private . . . John Cronin. Killed accidentally October 20, 1862. 
Patrick Haley. Killed Fair Oaks May 31, 1862. 
John Landis. Died December iS, 1S64, of wounds received at 
Cold Harbor June 1, 1864 ; buried Hampton, Ya. 



184 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



Private 



Wm. Linton. Killed Fair < )aks May 31, 1862. 

Cornelius Mundy. Died August 19, 1862, of wounds received 

at Fair Oaks May 31, 1.S62. 
Thomas Myers. Killed Cold Harbor June 1, 1S64. 
De Witt C. Palmer. Died December 6, 1S64, of wounds 

received at Winchester September 19, 1864. 
Howell Reeves. Died Washington, D. C, February 4, 1862; 

buried Military Asylum Cemetery, D. C. 
Adam Schenck. Killed Cold Harbor June 1, 1S64. 
Wm. H. Smith. Died June 28, 1864, of wounds received Cold 

Harbor June 1, 1864. 
Wm. Umstead. Died July, 1862, of wounds received at Fair 

Oaks, May 31. 1862. 



Captain . 
Sergeant 



Corporal . 
Private . 



COMPANY I 

Henry A. Marchant. Killed Cold Harbor June 1, 1864. 

Wm. II. Myers. Killed Sailors' Creek April 6, 1865, while 

Lieutenant K, 82d Pa. Infantry. 
John B. Bowers. Killed Cold Harbor June 1, 1S64. 
Henry Zimmerman. Killed Cold Harbor June 1, 1S64. 
John E. Brown. Killed Cold Harbor June 1, 1864. 
Wm. P. Blair. Killed Fair Oaks May 31, 1862. 
Edwin C. Brown. Killed Cold Harbor June 1, 1864. 
Wm. Carpenter. Died February 21, 1865, wounds received at 

Cold Harbor June 1, 1864 ; buried 1st Division General 

Hospital Cemetery, Annapolis, Md. 
John Childs. Killed Malvern Hill July 1, 1862. 
John Goodwin. Died in service ; date unknown. 
George H. Kline Died January 1, 1863; buried in Alexandria; 

grave 653. 
George E. L.Morrison. Killed Cold Harbor June 1, 1S64. 
Abner H. Reed. Killed Cold Harbor, June 1, 1864. 
Beneville S. Ruth. Died Andersonville November 16, 1864, 

of wounds received at Cold Harbor ; grave 12048. 
Geo. H. Seifred. Died of wounds received at Cold Harbor 

June 1, 1864. 
John Staub. Drowned August 18, 1861. 



COMPANY tl 

Lieutenant. . James G. Williamson. Killed Cold Harborjune 1, 1H64. 
Sergeant. . . John C. McLaughlin. Died August 6, 1862. 
Corporal . . . Alonzo Engleman. Died May, 1863. 

" ... John F. Hild. Died August 1, 1864, of wounds received front 

of Petersburg. 
" ... John Zaun. Killed Cold Harbor June I, 1864. 
Private. . . . John Allen. Died March 10, 1862; buried Military Asylum 
Cemetery, D. C. 
" .... George Bower. Died November 21, [861. 
" .... Thos. C. Beardsmore. Died June 6, 1864, from wounds 
received at Cold I larbor, June 1, 1864. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOU'NTKER INFANTRY. 



185 



Private. . . . Charles II. P.ryon. Killed Cold Harbor, June i. 1S64. 

Jacob Barger. 1 tied of wounds received at Petersburg April 

27, 1865 ; buried at Portsmouth drove, R. I. 
|. unes G. Cooney. Died June 2, 1862, of wounds received 

Fair ( taks May 31, 1862. 
Andrew Caldwell. Killed Fair Oaks, May 31, 1S62. 
John Donaghy. Killed Winchester September 19, 1N64. 
Edward Eisenbarth. Killed Cold Harbor June r, 1864. 
Ceo. F. Fox. Died January 25, 1S62. 
Wilson Hamilton. Killed Fair Oaks May 31, 1S62. 
Jacob Harp. Killed Cold Harbor June 1, 1S64. 
Richard Inson. Hied June 15, 1862, of wounds received at 

Fair ( >aks May 31, 1862. 
Daniel Mason. Killed Cold Harbor June 1, i-Sh4. 
Wm. McCleaiy. 1 >ied October 6, 1864, of wounds received at 

Cold Harbor June 1, 1S64. 
Gustavus Oscheger. Died February 1, 1862. 
Reading Rodgers. Died October 6, 1862, of wounds received 

at Malvern Hill. 
Jacob F. Simon. Killed Sailors' Creek April 6, 1S65. 
Charles SchmiU. Killed Cold Harbor June 1, 1864. 
Sidney B. Stull. Died April, 1S62. 
Thomas Umstead. Killed Fair Oaks May 31, 1S62. 
Aaron Van Fleet. Killed Cold Harbor June 1, 1864. 
Alexander Williamson. Killed Cold Harbor June 1, 1S64. 




186 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



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•ENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



1S7 



List of battles in which was incurred the killed and 
wounded while serving in the Twenty-third Pennsylvania 
Volunteer Infantry under head of original enlistments and 
recruits : 



BATTLES or ACTIONS 



Warwick Creek 

Williamsburg 

Fair ( )aks 

White Oak Swamp. . . . 
Charles City Cross Roads 

Turkey Bend 

Malvern Hill 

Fredericksburg . . . 

Marye's Heights 

Salem Church ..... 

( Gettysburg • . 

Kunkstown . . 

Mine Run 

Cold Harbor 

Petersburg 

Picket and Skirmish . . 



Totals . 



ORIGINAL 

ENLISTMENT 



37 



58 

3 



3 

7 
3 
3 

50 
2 

59 
3 

27 

3 

2 

108 



98 414 



RECRUITS 



I 
17 



18 




c 
2 
D 
M 

a 



5 
6 

3 
1 
2 

16 
2 
1 



37 



1 

75 

3 



126 



o 
c 
z 

a 

M 

a 



3 
1 
140 
7 
3 
3 

SO 
2 

64 
9 

3° 
4 
4 

124 
2 
6 



452 



Present also at Falling Waters, second battle of Mal- 
vern Hill. Chantilly, Rappahannock Station, North Anna, 
Hanovertown. Fort Stevens, D. C, Shenandoah Valley cam- 
paign to August 23, 1864, when veterans and recruits were 
transferred to Eighty-second Pennsylvania, the regiment being 
ordered home for muster out. 



TOTAL CASUALTIES 

Killed 126 

Wounded 45 2 

Died of disease, accidentally killed or drowned .... 59 

Total 637 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



The following is the list of killed and wounded of those 
that were transferred from the Twenty-third Pennsylvania to 
the Eighty-second Pennsylvania, or received commissions in 
other commands : 

KILLED OR 
DIED OF WOUNDS WOUNDED 

Marye's Heights i i 

Gettysburg i 

Wilderness 2 

Front of Petersburg, July 7, 1S64 . . 1 

Fort Stevens 1 

Winchester, Sept. 19, 1S64 ... 4 2 

Cedar Creek 1 

Pebbles' Farm 1 

Petersburg, April 2, 1N65 3 2 

Sailors' Creek 3 6 




PENNSYLVANIA V( iLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



189 



23D PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEERS 

three: years- service 

** ^ *' 

FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS 



R>\k 



Dati > 

03 MUSTEl 



Rem \kks 



David I!. Birnev . Colonel . Aug. 2, '6i 



Thomas H. Xeill 


Feb. 17. '62 


John Ely .... 


Oct. 7. '61 



John F. Glenn . . 



Charles Wilhelm . Lt.-Col. . 
George C. Spear . Major 

William J. Wallace " 



John E. Collins Adjutant. 

John B. Fassett 



Thomas K. Boggs. 



J. D. Chandler . . Q. M. 



C. F. H. Campbell Surgeon. 
A. Owen Stille . . 



John McGrath . . 
G. B. Fundenburg. 
William C. Roller. 



Aug. 4, '61 3 



Aug. 

Aug. 



•61 
'6i 



Aug. 14, '61 



Aug. 

Aug. 



Aug. 



Sept. 



Oct. 
Aug 



Nov. 
Jan. 
Aug. 



29. 
3- 



'6i 
'61 



'61 



'61 



'61 
'61 



'61 
'62 
'61 



Br. to Brig. -Gen. Feb. 17, '62 — 
to Maj.-Gen. May 23, 1863 — 
died Dec. 13, 1864, while in 
com. of 10th Army Corps. 

Pr. to Brig. -Gen. Dec. 13, 1S62 
— wd. Fair Oaks May 31, '62. 

Pr. from Major to Lt.-Col. July 
20, 1862 — Col. Dec. 13, i86:< 
— resigned Dec. 6, 1863 — Bv. 
Brig.-Gen. April 15, 1865 — 
wd. Fair Oaks May 31, 1862. 

Pr. from Capt., Co. A, to Major, 
July 20, 1862 — to Lieut. -Col. 
Dec. 13, '62 — to Col. Jan. 19, 
1S64— wd. Fair Oaks May 31, 
1862— mus. out with regiment 
September 8, 1864. 

Resigned July 20, 1S62 — reason, 
physical disability. 

Killed at Marye's Heights May 
3. 1863, while Col. command- 
ing 61st P. Y. 

Pr. from Capt., Co. E, Dec. 13, 
1862 — pr. Lt.-Col. Dec. 7,' 63 
— mus. out with reg. Sept. 8, 
'64 — wd. Fair Oaks May 31, 
1S62, and Cold Harbor June 
1, 1864. 

Tr. to Co. H, Sept., 1S61. 

Pr. from Co. F to Adj. Sept. 
25, 1S61 — tr. to Co. C as 1st 
Lieut. March 1, 1862. 

Pr. from 1st Lieut. Co. C Mar. 
1, 1S62 — mus. out with reg. 
Sept. S, 1864 — wd. Fair Oaks 
May 31, 1862. 

Pr. from 2d Lieut., Oct. 26, '61 
— mustered out with regiment 
September, S, 1864. 

Resigned November 14, 1S61. 

Disch. by order War Dept. 
Nov. 1, 1861 — re-appointed 
March 25, 1862 — died in ser- 
vice June 22, 1862. 

Discharged January 11, 1862. 

Discharged March 20, 1862. 

Pr. fr. Asst. Surg. June 24, '62 — 
mus out with reg. Sept. 8, '64. 



190 



HISTORY OF THE TWKNTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



I >A I I- 

Rank <h. Muster 

[Mi: Service 



Robert Tustine 



George Yeonians 



As. Surg. Aug. 4, '62 



Aug. 30, '62 



Rem \ b ks 



Anson T. Clark . " May 

Rev. ]as. G. Shinn Chaplain. Aug. 

Frank Maguigan . Sg. Maj. Aug. 

Edward B.Wilson " Aug. 



V. P. Donnelly 



Aug. 



14, 63 

31. '61 

8, '61 

2, '61 



'61 



Tobias W. Jones . 


" 


Aug 


s, 


'61 


3 


B. Frank Paris . . 


" 


Aug. 


2, 


'61 


3 


Win. Yodges, Jr. . 


" 


Aug. 


2, 


•61 


3 


Ira Webster . . . 


" 


Aug. 


6, 


'61 


3 


W. II . Albertson . 


Q. M. Sg. 


Sept. 


i, 


•61 


3 


Arthur F. Keene . 




Aug. 


2, 


'61 


3 


Oliver T. Eckert . 


Com. Sg. 


Sept. 


4. 


'61 


3 


Isaac McGrath . . 


" 


Sept. 




'6i 


3 


James Orton . . . 
William R. Jones . 
F. A. Neville . . . 


Hos. Std. 


Aug. 
Aug. 
Sept. 


8, 

8, 
1, 


'6i 
'61 
'61 


3 
3 



Dis. August 2, 1862, by order 
War Dept. for absence with- 
out leave. 

Disch. on Surgeon's certificate 
of disability March iS, 1863. 

Mus. out with reg. Sept. 8, '64. 

Mus. out with reg. Sept. S, '64. 

Mus. out with reg. Sept. 8, '64. 

Pr. from Co. B. to Sgt. Major 
June I, '62 — to 2d Lt. Co. K 
August 31, 1862. 

Tr. to 61st Pa. — wd. Marye's 
Heights May 3, 1863 ; Wilder- 
ness May, 1864, while Cap- 
tain said regiment. 

Pr. fr. Q. M. Sgt. Sept. 3,'6i— tr. 
as Priv. to Co. B, Nov. 3, '61. 

Pr. from Co. B Nov. 3, '61— tr. 
to Co. K May 3, 1S62 — dis- 
charged. 

Pr. to Sgt. Major May 3, 1S62 
— tr. to Co. F. June 1, 1862. 

Pr. from Sgt. Co. K Aug. 31, 
'62— killed Cold Harbor June 
1, 1864. 

Pr. from Co. A, July 12 1862 — 
mus. out with reg. Sept. 8,'64. 

Pr. from Co. F to Q. M. Sgt.— 
pr. to 2d Lieut. Co. B, July 
15. 1862. 

Pr. from Co. B, Mar. 11, 1S62— 
mus. out with reg. Sept. 8, '64. 

1 lischarged on Surgeon's cert. 
March 26, 1862. 

Tr. to Co. O, 61st P. V. 

Promoted 2d Lieut. <>ist 1'. Y. 

Re-enlisted — tr. to Sjd P. Y. — 
mustered out with regiment 
July 13, 1S65— veteran. 



Note. — The following abbreviations are used in the preparation of remarks : 



Ab. absent. 
Asst. assistant. 
Adj. Adjutant. 
Bu, buried. 
Bv. brevet. 
Bd. band 
Capt. Captain. 
Chap. Chaplain. 



Cor. Corporal. 
Com. commissioned 

in 1 ommissary. 
Ceil, certificate. 
Dis. dismissed. 
Dis'j disability. 
11, , dischai ged. 
Exp. expiration. 



Fr. from. 
Furl, furlough. 
Ilii. Hospital. 
Lt. Lieutenant. 
Mns. mustered. 
Mm. musician. 
Mis. missing. 
I'i . promoted 



PI. principal. 

Priv. private. 
Reg. regiment. 
Red. reduced. 
Res. resigned. 
Kem removed. 

51 Ml I II, III 

Serv. service. 



Suil; Surgeon 
Sgt. Sergeant. 
Sub. substitute 
Stew steward. 
Tr. transferrer" 
\ el \ eteran. 
Wd. wounded. 
Wds. wound 



PENNSYLVANIA V> H IN TKI'.k INFANTRY. 



191 



REGIMENTAL BAND 



Nami 



I hei ibald, 1 Ierman 
Asch, Charles . 
Braun, Francis 
Buch, John . . . 
Cobbin, Thomas 
Dausch, Michael 
Farrow, Janus C 
Freeman, John . 
Furness, \Vm. S. 
Grass, William . 
Goeber, Frank . 
Hock, John . . . 
1 [erman, Theo., jr. 
Landenberger, Frs. 



Dati 

01 MUSTE! 
INTO SERVIC1 



I ead 1'. '1 Aug, 31, '61 

Musician. Aug. 31, '61 

Aug. 31, ''. 

May 31, '62 

" Aug. 31, '6 

Aug. 31, '6 

Aug. 31, '6 

Aug. 31, '6] 

Aug. 31, '61 

Aug. 31, '61 

Aug. 31, '6i 

Feb. 4, '6: 

Aug. 31, '6 

Aug. 31, '61 



3 Disch. Gen. Or., Aug. 4, 1862 

3 Disch. Gen. Or., Aug. 4, 1862 

3 Disch. Gen. Or., Aug. 4, 1862 

3 I 

3 Disch. Gen. Or., Aug. 4, iM>: 

3 Disch. Gen. Or., Aug. 4, 1862 

3 Disch. Surg. Cert., May 3 1, '62 

3 Disch. Gen. Or., Aug. 4, 1862 

5 Disch. Gen. Or., Aug. 4, 1862 

3 Disch. Gen. Or., Aug. 4, 1862 

3 

\ Disch. Surg. Cert., May 31, '62 

3 Disch. Gen. Or., Aug. 4, 1862 

3 Disch. Gen. Or., Aug. 4, 1862 



Molyh, Conrad . 
Nicholson, James 
Parker, Henry H. 
Peffeffer, Charles 
Roth, John . . 
Rothenberger, C 
Sharp, Joseph . 
Schmidt, George 
Wagoner, John 
Wiley, Benjamin 
Walton, Benjamin. 
Wright. William H. 



Musician. 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 

Aug. 
Aug. 



31, '61 
31, '61 
31, '6) 

31. '61 
31, '61 
.V, '61 



Aug. 31, '61 
\ug. 31, '61 
Aug. 31, 'in 
Aug. 31, '61 
Aug. 31, '61 
Aug. 31, '61 



Disch. Gen. Or., Aug. 4, 1862 
Disch. Gen. Or., Aug. 4, 1862 

Disch. Gen. Or., Aug. 4, 1862 
Disch. Gen. Or., Aug. 4, 1862 
Tr. as Priv. Co. B, Mar. 11, '62 

Disch. Gen. Or., Aug. 4, 1S62 

Died Aug. 10, 1862. 

Disch. Gen. Or., Aug. 4, 1862 



COMPANY A 

RECRUITED AT PHILADELPHIA 



John F. Glenn . 
1 ri orge Wood . 

Wm. B. Foster . 
Jacob Heyer . . 



Capt 



Aug. 4, '61 3 Promoted to Maj. July 20, '62- 
wounded at Fair Oaks, May 
31, 1862. 

Aug. 21, '61 3 Promoted to Capt. from 1st Lt. 
Co. D., July 22, 1862 — tr. to 
Co. E, March I, '63 — wounded 
at Fair Oaks, May 31, 1862. 

Aug. 8, '61 3 Promoted from 1st Sgt. to 1st 
Lt. July 12, 1862 — to Capt. 
March 1, 1863— wounded at 
Marye's Heights, May 3, '63 — 
disc, on Surg. cert, of dis'y, 
Nov. 22, 1863. 

Aug. 8, '61 3 Promoted from Sgt. to 1 st Sgt.. 
< >ct. 2, '61 — to 2d Lt., July 14, 
'62— to 1st Lt., March 1, '63 — 
to Capt., Nov. 22, '63 — mus. 
out with regt., Sept.S, '64— 
wounded at Cold Harbor, 
June 1, 1S64. 



192 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD RF.G1MENT 



Name 




John W. Crosby . ist Lt 



Fitzhugh Birney 
Henry G. Fritsch 



George W. Nagle. 2d Lt 
Robert McClelland 



Theodore Bisbing . Serg't 
James Colwell . . 



Michael McGraw 



James Collins . . 



Frank Maguigan . 
Charles Schtretter. 



Philip Stengle . 

William Williams 

Wm. H. Albertson Corp 
E. A. Bradender . 



William Cuthbert 
John Dunn . . . . 
John W. I >a\ is 



Sol. Eon-baugh . . 
Charles E. I lubcr . 



Date 

of Mrs 11 R 

into Service 



Aug. S, '61 



Dec. 
Aug. 



Aug. 
Aug. 



Aug. 
Aug. 



Aug. 
Aug. 



Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

A UK- 
Aug. 



Vug 

Aug. 



1, '61 
S, '61 



8, '61 
8, '61 



S, '6i 
8, '6i 



3, '61 



Aug. 

Aug. 8, '6i 



8, '61 
S, '61 



Aug. 8, '61 
Aug. 8. '61 



8. '6i 
8, '6i 

8, '6 1 
8, '61 
8, '61 



s. '(,, 
8, '<,, 



Transferred to 61st P. Y. — 
wounded at Ft. Stevens, D. 
C, July 11, 1864 — killed at 
Petersburg, April 2, '65, while 
Col. commanding 61st 1'. Y. 

Trans, to Sig. Corps, Jan., '62. 

Promoted to 2d Lt., March 1, 
'63 — to 1 st Lt., Nov. 22, '63 — 
to Capt. Co. B, Aug, 8, 186L 

Resigned Oct. 20, 1861. 

Promoted from Sgt. to istSgt., 
March 1, 1863— to 2d Lieut., 
Jan. 1, 1S64 — mustered out 
with Co., Sept. 8, 1N64. 

Died in service, Dec, 1861. 

Promoted to ist Lt., Aug. 25, 
1864— trans, to Co. F, S2d 
P.W — mustered out with Co., 
July 13, 1865 — Yet. — wounded 
atMarye's Heights.May 3/63. 

Promoted from Corp., Nov. 22, 
1S63 — mustered out with Co,, 
Sept. S, 1S64 — wounded at 
Cold Harbor, June 1, 1864. 

Promoted from Corp., Nov. 22, 
1S63 — mustered out with Co., 
Sept. 8, 1864 — wounded at 
Cold Harbor, June 1, 1864. 

Prom, to Sgt-Maj., June 1, 1864. 

Trans, to Co. E, 82d P. V.— 
mustered out with Co., July 
13, 1865 — Yet. — wounded at 
Marye's Heights, May 3, '63. 

Pro. from Corp., Nov. 22, '63 — 
mustered out with Co., Sept. 
S, 1864 — wounded at Gettys- 
burg, July 3, 1863. 

Promoted from Corp.. Nov. 22, 
1863 — mustered out with Co., 
Sept. 8, 1864 — wounded at 
Funkstown, July, (86j. 

Promoted to Q. ML Sgt., of 2}d 
P. Y., July 12, 1862. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks, May .31, 
[862— disc. June 1, 1863, for 
wounds received at Marye's 
Heights, May 3, i86- v 

Transferred to Co. E. 82d P.V. 
— mustered out with Co. as 
Sgt.. July 13, 1865— Yet. 

Promoted to Corp., Nov. 22, 
[863 mustered out with Co., 
Sept. 8, 1864. 

Promoted to Corp., Nov. 22, 
[863 — mustered out with Co., 
Sept. 8, [864 

Killed at Fair Oaks, May 31, '62. 

Transferred to Co. F, 82a P .V. 
— must, out July 13, 1865 — 
Vet. wounded Cola I [arbor, 
June 1. [864. 



PENNSYLVANIA V< (LUNTEER INFANTRY. 



193 







James Martin . . Corp 



Dati 

OF Ml S i i i 

[ \ i m Ser vh 



Aug. 8, '61 



Thomas Meyers . 
John McKernon 


Aug. 
Aug. 


8, 

8, 


'6i 
'6i 


1 [ugh Patterson . 


Aug. 


8, 


'6i 


t ii i irge W. Moore 


Aug. 


8, 


'6i 


John H. Metcalf . 

\\ illiam 1. < )iii"U-v. 


Aug. 

Alicr 


s, 
a 


'6i 

'6? 



Caleb Brickman . Uig 

Chas. H. Wakefield Aug. 

George Lindsay . Muc. . . Aug. 



Lew is Sibley . . Aug. 

Anderson, George Private . Aue. 



Andrews, James \. Aug. 

Andrews. Edw. C. " Aug. 

Beck. H. K. . . . " Aug. 

Burt, Franklin . Aug. 



30, '61 

S, '61 



Bateman, Joseph J. 

Barry, Albert B. . Sept. 

Berg, John O. . . ; " Aug. 

Branigan, Patrick. Aug. 

Brighton, Ephraim " Jan. 



Sept. 1, '61 



1, '61 

8, '61 

8, '61 
17, '63 



Branson, Edw. R. Feb. 8, '64 



8, 


'6i 


.1 


s, 


•61 


3 


s, 


•61 


3 


8, 


'61 


3 


8, 
8, 


•61 
'61 


3 
3 


8, 
11, 


'61 
•63 


3 
3 


8, 


'61 


3 


8, 


'61 


3 



Remarks 



Trans, to Co. F, S 2 d P. V.— 
mustered out with Co. as 1st 
Sgt., July 13, 1865 — Yet. — 
wounded at Marye's Heights, 
May 3, 1S63. 

Trans, to Co. H, Aug. 23, 1861. 

Transf. to Co. F, 82d P. V. as 
1st Sgt. — com. 2d Lieut. — 
killed at Petersburg, April 2, 
1S65 — Yet— wounded at Cold 
Harbor. June 1, 1864. 

Discharged on Surg, certificate, 
March 5, [863. 

Discharged on Surg, certificate, 
.March 27, 1S62. 

Promoted to Corp., Nov. 22, 
1863 — mustered out with Co., 
Sept. 8, 1864 — wounded at 
Gettysburg, July 3, 1S63. 

Promoted to Corp., Nov. 22, 
1863 — mustered out with Co., 
Sept. 8, 1S64 — wounded at 
Gettysburg, July 3, 1863. 

Died in service, at Washington, 
D. C, Nov. 30, 1 86 1. 

Deserted, Oct. iS, 1862. 

Transferred to Co. F, S2d P.Y. — 
mustered out with Co., July 
13, 1865— Yet. 

Deserted January, 1862. 

Drafted — transferred to Co. F., 
82d P. V. — deserted, date un- 
known. 

Transferred to Co. H, 23d P.V., 
Sept. 1 86 1. 

Died in service, at Johnson's 
Island, Feb., 1864 — wounded 
at Funkstown, July, 1S63. 

Mustered out with Co., Sept. 
8, 1864, 

Absent on detached service 
with Sth N. Y. Art.— disc. 
Sept. S, 1864 — wounded at 
Marye's Heights, May 3, 1863. 

Mustered out with Co., Sept. 8, 
1864— wounded and captured 
at Malvern Hill, July 1, 1862. 

Mustered out with Co., Sept. 8, 
1864. 

Transferred to Co. I, 23d P.V., 
Sept. 1, 1S61. 

Transferred to Co., S2d P.V. 

Drafted— transferred to Co. F, 
82d PA'.— mustered out with 
Co., July 13, 1S65. 

Trans, to Co. F. S 2 d P. 1.9, 
discharged by G. O., Ma- \, 
1S55 — wounded Cold Har 
June 1, 1864. 



194 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



Barnes, Reuben . 



Private 



Horn, Peter . 



Hartley, William. 



Boyd, William . 



Bond, Lewis . . . 

Bishop, Samuel S. 
Brown, James . . 
Carney, Wm. ]. 



Carpenter, Jno. C. 
Claflin, Orlando . 



Condon, Richard . 
Conlin, Peter . . . 
Davenport, Robert 



Davis, Elias. . . . 
Dougherty, John 
Dunton, Mich. A. 
Davenport, II. II. 

Degroot, John . 

I lavis, I >aniel . . 
I >avis, Benjamin 
I lawson, William 

I i, . 1 1 ■ ■ 1 1. ■ 1 l\ , \\ in. 
Endress, Harry 1 
Forebaugh, W. \\ 
Foreman, John \Y 
Farley, Edward . 



Fox, William . . 
Fowler, William. 

( larsi m, I. '-wis !■'. 



I'M 1 

. if Muster 

INTO Si KVIl i 


< 
- 

T 


Aug. s, 


'6i 


3 


Aug. 8, 


'6i 


3 


Sept. 22, 


'64 


3 


Aug. 8, 


'6i 


3 



Aug. 8, '6i 



Aug. 6, 
Sept. i, 
Aug. S, 



'6i 

'6i 
'6i 



Sept. i, 
Aug. 8, 
Aug. 8, 

Allg. 12, 

Aug. 8, 

Aug. 8, 
Aug. 8, 
July 2S, 
Aug. 8, 

Aug. 8, 

Sept. 6, 

Aug. 8, 

Ian. 21, 

Aug. 8, 

Aug. 8, 

Aug. 24. 

Aug. 8, 

Aug. s, 

Aug. 1 1 , 

Man li |. 



'6i 



'63 



'61 

'63 

'61 

'61 



'61 3 



'63 
'61 

'61 

'.V 
'63 

•(,1 
'61 
•61 
•61 
'61 



'63 
•62 



Sept. 1 . 1,1 



Transferred to Yt. Res. Corps- 
wounded at Warwick C. H., 
April, 186:, and I- air < >aks, 

May 31, 1862. 
Wounded at Fair t )aks, May 3 1 , 

1862— killed at Cold Harbor, 

June 1, 1864. 
Trans, to Co. C, S2d P. V.— 

discharged as Corp , June 17, 

1S65. 
Wounded at Gettysburg, July, 

1863— killed at Cold Harbor, 

June 3, 1864. 
Deserted June, 1862 — wounded 

at Williamsburg, May 5, '62. 
Transferred to Co. K, 23d P.V. 
Transferred to Co. E, 23d P.V. 
Mustered out with Co., Sept. 

S, 1864 — wounded at Malvern 

Hill, July 1, 1862. 
Mustered out with Co., Sept. S, 

1S64 — wounded at Fair Oaks, 

May 31, 1S62. 
Drafted — transferred to Co. 1-', 

82d P. Y. — mustered out with 

Co., July 13, 1865. 
Deserted August, 1S61. 
Deserted August 16, 1863, 
Wounded at Fair Oaks, Ma) 

31, 1862— disc. Sept. 8, iNhj. 
Mustered out with Co., Sept. 

8, 1S64. 
Transferred to Co. H, 23d P.V., 

Sept., 1861. 
Drafted —transferred to Co. F. 

82d P. Y.— disc. July 13, 1S65. 
Trans, to Co. F, 82d P. V,— 

mustered out with Co., July 
[3, [865— Vet. 
Hied in service, at Washington, 

D. C, Dec. 24, 1 86 1. 
Deserted Jan. 19, 1862. 
Deserted June 3, 1862. 
Deserted April 20, 1863, 
Not on muster-out roll. 
Killed at Fair* >aks. Ma\ 51 ,'62 
Mus. out with Co., Sept. 8, 1864. 
I )isc. on Surg, cert.. Sept r,'62. 

Tr. to Co. F, 82d P. Y. wd. at 
Salem Heights. Max 4, 1863 — 
mustered out with Co., July 
13, t86s— Vet. 

I (rafted- -transferred to 1 o. E, 
82d P. V.— disc. July 13, [865. 

Ir.ins. to Co. I'', 82d P.V.— 
mustered out March 4, 1865, 

expiratii >n of term of service. 
Mustered out with Co., Sept. 8, 

(864 wd. at Cold Harbor. 
June, [864 



PENNSYLVANIA V< tLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



195 




ATI 

01 Mi 

INTO SRRVICI 



Gibbs, John W . . 

Gwynne, I >a\ id . 
( ireen, Philip . . 

I [anion, James 

I lavens, Joseph . 

Hilton. \\ in. F. 
1 [astings, Jacob R 

Hauler. Daniel . 

Harris. James. 

Holmes, Reuben 

Hennessy. Alt'. J. 
Hutton, John . . 
Jump, Henry . . 

Jones, Francis 
Jones, Tobias \Y. 

Johnson, Stephen 

Jacoby, John B. . 
Jones, Thomas 
Kearnes. Patrick 
Kefferlier. Louis . 



Kates, John VV. 



Kasch, Herman . 

Kavanagh, Peter . 
Kresey, William . 
Kilpatrick, James. 



Knocke, Frederick 



Kidney, William J 
Knox, Joseph . . 
Kelly, John . . . 
Kelly, James . . 
Kenny, Martin 
Little,' Noah '. . 
Lawson. William 

Lence, Augustus 



Private . Sept. [3, '62 





" 


Aug. 


8, '6i 




" 


Aug. 


8, '6i 




•• 


Aug. 


S, '6: 




•■ 


Aug. 


1 1, '61 




.. 


Aug. 


8, '6i 






Aug. 


6i 




July 


27, '63 




.. 


Aug. 


1 1, '63 



Aug. 8, 
Aug. S, 
Aug. S, 

Aug. 10, 
Aug. 8, 



Aug. 1 r, '63 



Aug. 8, 

Aug. S, 

Aug. 8, 

Aim. 8, 



Feb. 



Aug. 8, 

Jan. 1, 
Sept. 13, 
Sept. 13, 



Aug. 24, 

Aug. 24, 

Aug. 8, 

Aug. 12, 

Aug. S, 

Aug. 12, 

Aug. 8, 

Aug. 8, 

Aug. 8, 



Aug. S. '6i 3 



61 
61 

61 

'63 
6i 



hi 


3 


63 


3 


6] 


3 


6) 


3 


64 


3 


61 


3 


62 


i 


62 


3 


62 


3 


61 


3 


61 


3 


61 


3 


63 


3 


63 


3 


6.3 


3 


61 


3 


61 


3 


61 


3 



Remarks 



I j i :i harged on Surg, ceriilii at< 
March 27, [864— wounded at 
Mine Run, Nov., 1,863. 

1 (eserted August, 1861. 

Deserted June, 1863 — wounded 
at Malvern Hill, July 1, [862. 

I »is< harged for wounds received 
at Turkey Bend, July. 1862. 

Detached with 1st Pa. Light 
Artillery — disc. August, [864 

Mus. out with Co., Sept. 8, [864. 

Discharged on Surg, certificate, 
April 29. 1863 — wounded at 
Fair Oaks, May 31, 1862. 

Drafted — transferred to Co. 1". 
82d P. V. — mustered out with 
Co.. July 13, 1865. 

I >rafted — transferred to Co. F, 
S2d P. V. — captured at Stone 
House Mount'n, Sept. 16, '63. 

flans, to Co. F, 82d P. V. — 
disc. July 24, 186.S — Vet. 

Deserted August, 1861. 

Deserted August, 1861. 

1 Msrharged Sept.. 1864— wd. at 
Marve's Heights, May 3, '63. 

Trans." to U. S. N. Feb.", 1864. 

Promoted to 1 ». M. Sgt., 23d 
P. V., Sept., 1861. 

T.)rafted — transferred to Co. C, 
82d P. V. 

Deserted Nov., 1861. 

Drafted — Deserted Aug. 16, '63. 

Mus. out with Co., Sept. S, '64. 

Discharged on Surg, certificate 
of disability. Sept. 19, 1862 — 
wounded on picket at War- 
wick C. H., April. 1862. 

Trans, to Co. F, S2d P. V. — 
mustered out with Co., July 

13, 1865. 
Trans, to Co. H, 23d P. V, 

Sept., 1861. 
Transferred to Co., S2d P.V. 
Transferred to Co., 82d P.V. 
Wd. at Mine Run, Nov., 1863 — 

killed at Cold Harbor, June 1, 

1 864. 
Died in service, at Washington, 

D. C, Dec. 19, 1S61. 
Deserted Jan. 19, 1862. 
Deserted Dec. 14, 1S61. 
Drafted — des. Aug. 16, 1863. 
Drafted — des. Aug. 16, 1863. 
Drafted — des. Aug. 16, 1S63. 
Mus. out with Co., Sept. 8, '64. 
Transferred to Co. M, 23d P.Y., 

Aug., 1S61. 
Transferred to Co. H, 23d P. V., 

Sept.. 1861. 



196 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



N A \l E 




Leonard, Henry . Private 
McLanlin, J. C . . ' 



Moore, Thomas . 



Murray, Charles . 
Malone, James M. 

Morgan, Dan'l P. 



Miller, James . . 
McCormick, Mich'l 

McKinley, Henry . 

McDonough, Edw. 

McGraw, John 

McManus, Michael 
McCully, Hugh , . 

Nichols, Filbert W. 
Newcamp, John . . 

Orton, James . . . 
Patton, John . . . 

Patterson, James . 

Powell, C'.eo. H. . 

Phillips, John K. . 
Riley, John .... 
Rodgers, Charles . 
Kittenhouse, M. P. 



Riley, James 
Reeves, Joseph L. 

Kepshare, Jacob . 
Slemmons, Jno. K. 



Schutretter, Win. 



llMI 
OF Ml'STER 

into Service 



Aug. ii, 
Aug. S, 



61 , 



Aug. 8, '6i ' 



Aug. 
Aug. 


8. 

s, 


'6i 

'6i 


Aug. 


8, 


'6i 


Aug. 
Aug. 


12, 

8, 


'63 
'6i 


Aug. 


s, 


'6i 


Aug. 


8, 


'6i 



Aug. 8, '6i 



Aug. 12, 

Aug. 8, 



Aug. S, 
Sept. 4, 



Aug. 8, 

Aug. S, 

Feb. 20, 

Aug. 2.S, 

Aug. j, 

Aug. S, 

Aug. s, 

Aug. s. 



Jan. [3, 
Aug. 1?, 

Aug. 8, 
Aug. 2 |. 



An 'j 



'63 
'61 



61 
62 



61 



61 



62 



3 
62 k 



Remarks 



6) 3 



'63 3 

'6) 3 
•6] 3 



'6. 3 



V.— 
K, July 

Sailors' 



Dratted — deserted Aug. 16, '63. 

Died in service, Aug. 20, 1862, 

from wounds received at Fair 

Oaks, May 31, 1862. 

Mustered out with Co., Sept 8, 

1864 — wounded on picket in 

front of Richmond. 

Mus. out with Co., Sept 8, 1864. 

1 )ischarged on Surg, certificate, 

Feb. 24, 1863. 

Trans, to Co^ F., S 2 d P. V.— 

mustered out with Co., July 

13, 1865 — Vet. — wounded at 

Fair Oaks, May 31, 1862. 

Deser'd Aug. 16, [863 — drafted. 

Mus. out with Co., Sept. 8, '64 — 

wd. at Fair Oaks, May 31, '62. 

Transferred to Co. H., 23d P. 

V., Sept , 1S61. 
Died in service, July 16, 1.S62, 
of wounds received at Fair 
Oaks, May 31, 1862. 
Trans, to Co. F., 82d 
must, out as Sgt. Co. 
13, 1 86 5 — \ ' et . — wd . 
Creek, April 6, 1865. 
Drafted — deserted Aug. 16, '63. 
1 Vserted Jan. 1/64 — returned — 
des. again, April 1, 1864 — wd. 
at Salem Heights, May 3, .'63. 
Trans, to Vet. Res. Corps. 
Wounded at < '.ettvsburg, July 3, 
1S63— killed at 'Cold Harbor, 
June 1, 1864. 
Promoted to Com. Sgt., 23d 

P. Y.. Sept. 1861. 
Mustered out with Co., Sep) 8, 
1864 — wd. at Cold Harbor, 
June 3, 1S64. 
Trans, to Co. F, 82d 

mustered out Feb. 20, 
Trans, to Co. I', 8?d 
1 lisch. June 17, 1865. 
Dratted deserted Aug. n>, '<>3. 
Mus. out with Co., Sept. 8, '64. 
Mus. out with Co., Sept. 8, '64. 
I 1. ins, to ('<'. 1''. 82d P. V. — 

mus. out with Co. as Corp., 
July 3. 1865 — Yet. — wounded 
at Marye's 1 [eights, May 3, '63, 
and at Malvern 1 lill July 1 ,'62. 

Drafted — deserted April 27, 

I Irafted— trans, to Co. 
P. Y. — discharged. 

I leserted Nov., [86i . 

Mus. out with Co., Sept. 8,'64 — 
wounded at Fair < 'aks, May 

31, 1862 — wounded at Marye's 
Heights. May 3, [863. 
Mus. out with Co., Sept 8, '64. 



V.— 
1865. 
V— 



,'63. 

8..,1 



T.XNSYl.V.WIA VOLUNTEER [NFANTRY, 



197 



N \M! 



K 1\K 



Snyder, Theodore Private 

Speakman, Lewis J. 

Saxton, John E. . 
Steel, Paul ... 

Smith, Jos. L. . . 



Sheridan, Peter . . 
Sullivan, Francis . 
Stacy, William . . 

Smith, John 
Turner, William J. 



Tustin, Abraham. 
Tapper. William . 
Thomas, Benj. T. 
Tully, Jos. M. . . 
Tobin. Frank . . . 



Turner, Alexander. 

Thomas, Charles . 
Tustin. Isaac . . . 



YanYalkenb'rgAV. 



Winters, Enos. . 
Wills, Samuel 

Wills. William F. 



I • \ 1 1 

01 Muster 

i m i . Ser vi c i 



Aug. 24, 

Aug. 8, 

Aug. s, 
Jan. 22, 
Aug. 8, 



Aug. ro, 

Aug. 8, 
Aug. 8, 

Aug. 12, 
Aug. 8. 



Aug. 8, 

Aug. 8, 

Aug. S, 

Aug. 8, 

Aug. 8, 



Aug. 8, 

Aug. 11, 
Aug. 8. 



Aug. 8, 



Aug. 8, 
Aug. S, 

Aug. 8, 



Remarks 



61 

61 

61 I 
62 



61 


3 


63 


.1 


6, 


1 


61 


3 


63 


3 


61 


3 


61 


< 


61 


1 


61 


? 


61 




61 


3 


61 


3 


6.3 


3 


61 


3 


61 


3 


61 


3 


61 


3 


61 


3 



Mus. out with Co., Sept. 8, 

1S64 — wounded at White 1 >,ik 

Swamp, June, [862. 
Mustered out with Co., Sept. 8, 

1S64 — wounded at Pair Oaks, 

May 31, 1S62. 
Discharged on Surg, certificate 

of disability, Feb. 24, 1S63. 
Prans. to Co. F, 82d P. V.— 

discharged April 17, 1865. 
'Prans. to Co. F, 82d P. V.— 

mustered out with Co., Julv 

13, [865— Vet. 
Drafted — deserted Aug. 16, '63. 
Deserted Nov. 16, 1861. 
Deserted Jan. 1864 — Yet. — wd. 

at P'air Oaks, May 31, 1S62. 
Drafted — deserted Aug. 16, '63. 
Mus. out with Co., Sept. 8/64 — 

wd. Charles City X Koads, 

June. 1862. 
Mus. out with Co., Sept. 8, '64. 
Mus. out with Co., Sept. 8, '64. 
Trans, to Co., 82d P. V. 
Must, out with Co., Sept. 8, '64. 
Trans, to Co. F, 8 2 d P. V.— 

disch. May 20, 1865 — wound. 

at Cold Harbor, June 1, 1864. 
I Hscharged on Surg. cert, of 

disability, April 1, 1S63. 
Drafted — deserted Aug. 16, '63. 
1 )isch. on Surg, certificate. Jan. 

23, 1863 — wd. at Fair Oaks, 

May 31, 1862. 
Deserted May 9, 1864 — Yet. — 

wounded at Salem Church, 

May 4, 1863. 
Must, out with Co., Sept. S,'64. 
I )ischarged on Surg, certificate 

of disability, March, 1863. 
Killed at Cold Harbor, June 1. 

1S64— Vet. 



COMPANY B 

RECRUITED AT PHILADELPHIA 



Louis Hillebrand . 


Captain . 


Au-. 


2, '61 


3 


Resigned August 1, 1S62. 


Jesse Simcox . . . 




Aug. 


24, '61 


3 


Promoted from 1st Lieut, of Co. 
G Aug. 31, '62 — absent at 
muster out. 


Henry G. Fritsch . 


(< 


Aug. 


2, '61 


3 


l'romoted from 1st Lieut. Co. 
A Aug. 8, '64 — transferred to 
82d P. Y. Sept. 14, 1864— 
discharged July 13, '65. 


George W. Mindil. 


1st Lieut. 


Aug. 


2, '61 


3 


Transferred as Capt. Co. R. 
23d P. V., Oct. 5, '61— de- 
tached as Adj. -Gen. of Gen. 
Kearnev's staff. 



198 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



Name 




Date 

OF MlSTKG 

Si rvice 



Wm. H. Coulston. rst Lieut. Aug 2, '6l 



Joshua S. Garsed 



Arthur F. Keene . 



Arthur E. Clover . 
B. Frank Paris . . 



Chas L. Snively. . 

Joseph B. Shaw . . 
Frank A. Connelly 

I lavid Lewis . . . 



Edward Howell . . Corp 
David Gardner 



Thos. McKnight 
II B. Fraquair . 

Wm. S. Wilkins. 

Max. I.akemeyer 

Geo. F. Peifer. . 



Aus 



Aus 



Edw. VV. Lawrence 1st Sergt. Aug. 
Wm. R. Peddle . . " Aug. 



Henry Crease . . " Aug. 

Wm. Justice. Jr. . Sergeant Aug. 
James M. Stewart. " Aug. 



Aug. 
Aug. 



Aug. 

Aug. 
Aug. 



2. -6i 3 



'6i 



'6i 3 
'61 3 



•61 3 

•61 3 

'61 3 

'61 3 

'61 3 



•61 3 

'61 3 



Aug. 2. '61 3 



Aug. 
Aug. 


2. 
2, 


'6i 

'61 


3 
3 


Any. 
Aug. 


2. 

2. 


•61 
■61 


3 
3 


Aug. 


2. 


•61 


3 


Aug. 


2. 


'61 


3 



Aug. 2. '61 3 



REM \Kks 



Promoted from 2d Lieut. 1 let. 
20. '61 — accidentally wounded 
at Warwick Creek. April, 62 
— resigned July 12. '62. 

Promoted from Corp. to Serg. — 
to 2d Lieut. Oct. 20. '61— to 
1st Lieut. July 12, '62— killtd 
at Gettysburg. July 3, '63. 

Promoted from Om.-Sgt. to ad 
Lt. July 15. '62— to 1st Lt. 
July 3. '63 — transferred to s:d 
P. V., Sept. 14. '64 — dischar'd. 

Reduced to ranks — deserted 
Oct.. [862. 

Promoted from Sergt. to 1st 
Lt., Co. A. 157th P. V. Aug.. 
'62 — promoted to Capt — u 'd 
in action near Petersburg, 
Va . July 7, '64 — dischargi d 
1 >> t . [864. 

Promoted from Sgt. — mustered 
out with Co. Sept. 8, '64. 

Disch'd as private on Surgeon's 
certificate of disab'y, Dec.'6i. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate June. '62. 

Deserted 1 tec., '62. 

Promoted to Corp. -transferred 
to Co. R. toSgt.-Maj. — trans, 
to Co. K — discharged. 

Promoted from ranks — wound. 
at Marye's Heights Mav 3, 
'6} — mustered out with Co. 
Sept. s. '64. 

Promoted from ranks — absent : 
sick at muster-out. 

Pr. from ranks— wd. at Cold 
Harbor June 1, 1S64 — re-en- 
listed ; transfem d to ^2d P. 
Y. — mus. out July 13. [865 

Promoted from the ranks — w'd 
at Fair 1 i.iks May 31, '62 — 
nuis'd out with Co. Sept. s. 'ti.j 

I teserted I tecember, 

\\ ounded Malvern 1 lill July 1 . 
'62 — discharged on Surgeon's 
certificate Nov., '02 

I 1 ■■-.. 1 ted 1 tei . '62. 

Musteredout as Privatewith Co. 
Sept. 8, '64. 

Promot'd to Corporal — desert'd 
Aug., '62. 

Pr. to Corporal -wounded at 
Marye's Heights May 3/63 — 
killed at Cold Harbor June 

1. i s '>4. 

Promoti d to I lorporal— woun'd 
at Cold 1 [arboi [uni i. 64 
mustered out u ith Co., Sept. 
3, '64. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



199 



N \ M I 



Date 

Kink : stir 



RbMARKS 



1 >aniel i iraeber . . " 


Aug. 


2. '6l 


3 


T. Habbermaker . 


Aug. 


2, '6l 


3 


1 [enry McConnell. " . . 


Aut;. 


2, '6l 


3 


Jacob Mayer " 


Aug. 


2. '6| 


3 



Louis Strenner . 



Bernard Simon 



Benj. F. Jenkins . 



Aus;. 2. '6i 3 



Musician Aug. 2, '6i 3 



Aug. 2. '61 3 



Eugene Bentley . . Corp.. Aug. 2. '61 3 Promoted to Corporal— woun'd 

at I'air Oaks May 31, '62 — 

mustered out with Co. Sept. 
8, 64. 
Promi ited t< 1 Corporal — woun'd 

lair 1 »aks May 31, '62 — nms. 
out with Co., Sept. 8, '64. 
Promoted to Corporal — woun'd 

at Cold Harbor June- r, '64 — 
k ' (I at Winchester. Sept. 1 9, '64. 

Promo'd to Corp'l — re-enlisted 
— transferred to82d P.W.Co. 
F — discharged July 13, '65. 

Promo'd to Corp'l— re-enlisted 
— transferred to Co. F, S2d 
P. V. — wounded at Fair Oaks 
May 31, '62, at Malvern Hill 
Jul\ r. '62, and at Marye's 
Heights May 3/63 — discharg. 
July 13. '65. 

Pn mioted to Corporal — wound, 
at Fair ( >aks May 3:, '62 — dis- 
charged on Surgeon's certifi- 
cate April, '63. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
'62, and Turkey Bend June 
30, '62 — mustered out as pri- 
vate with Co. Sept. s. '64. 

Re-enlisted — transferred as pri- 
vate toS2d P. V., Co F — dis- 
charged July 13, '65. 

Transferred to 82d P. V., Co. 
F — discharged Jan. 2S, '65. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certifi- 
cate Aug., '62. 

Captu'd at Stone House Moun- 
tain Sept., '63 — exchanged 
Decemb'r 10/64 — discharged 
March 15, '65. 

Must'd out with Co. Sept. S,'64. 

Dratted — transferred to Co. F, 
82d P.Y.— disch. July 13, '65. 

Drafted — transferred to Co. F, 
82d P. V —disch. July 13, '65. 

Drafted — transferred to Co. , 
82d P. V. 

Wounded at Funkstown. Md.. 

July, 63, transferred to 82d P. 

V., Co. F — dise'd May 17, '65. 

Mar. 31, '64 3 Transferred to S2d P. Y., Co. 

F — discharged July 13, '65. 

Killed at Fair ( laks May 31, '62. 

Deserted March, '62. 

Deserted August, '62. 

Wounded June 1, '62, at Fair 
Oaks — mustered out with Co. 
Sept. 8, '64. 
Sept. 3, '62 3 Wounded at Cold Harbor June 
I, '64 — transferred to 828 P. 
V. — discharged June 17, '65 



Henry McKim . . 


Jan. 


28, 


•62 


3 


Adam Mitchell . . 


Sept. 


I, 


•61 


3 


1 ■ irge VV. Blank . " 


Sept. 


I, 


'61 


3 


Bignall, Attilla G. . Private 
Boyer, Samuel . . " 


Aug. 
Aug. 


2, 
IO, 


'6i 
•63 


3 
3 


Bedford, Thi imas . " 


Aug. 


II, 


'63 


3 


Beiger. John ... 


Aug. 


8, 


•63 


3 


Bohn, John ... 


Sept. 


12, 


•62 


3 



Barbour, James H, 

Boyd, David . . . 
Boov, John . 
Bell," David .... 
Coates. Henrv C. . 



Carty, Henry . 



Aug. 


2, '61 


3 


Aug. 


2, '61 


3 


Aug. 


2, '61 


3 


Sept. 


3, '61 


3 



200 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



Name 



Cohnhoff, Louis 
Castle, James . . 
Drew, Henry G. 



Doherty, James J. 

Dorn, Theodore 

Dickson, Joseph 
Devine, Michael 

Ely, Samuel L. . 
Eckstein, James 

Eckert, Oliver J. 

Fow, Jacob . . . 




Private 



Ferguson, William 

Fisher, Howard Y. 

George, Alexander 
Grouse, Michael . 

Gifford, Edward 

Gamble, Jos. W. 

Gillespie, Janus. . 

Gaw, Robert P. . . 
Graham, Thos. J. . 

Gaw, Charles O. . 
Hampton, W'm. II. 

I lul worth, I ienry . 
I lolzer, Jacob V. . 

Hubbard, Thomas. 
1 lahmon, John . 
I larris, W'm. J. . . 



1 1 A 1 1 

of Muster 
into Service 


< 

> 

1 

- 






f, 


Aug 


2, '6l 


1 


Aug 


2, '6l 


1 


Aug 


2, '6l 


3 


Aug 


2, '6l 


3 


Aug 


2, '6l 


3 



Sept. 


15. 


'6i 


Aug 


2, 


'6i 


Aug. 
Aug. 


2, 

2, 


'6i 

'6i 


Sept. 


4. 


•6i 


Aug. 


2, 


'6i 



Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 
Aug. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Aug. 
Aug 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 



to, '6;, 
2, '6i 
2, '6l 

to. '63 

2, '61 
14, '62 



collision 
Philadel- 



2, 


'61 


3 


2, 


'61 


3 


2, 


'6l 


3 


2, 


'6l 


3 


2, 


•6l 


3 


2, 


'6, 


3 


2, 


•61 


3 


I, 


'61 


3 


O, 


•63 


3 


9. 


•63 


3 



Deserted August, '62. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Wounded at Winchester Sept. 
19, '64 — re-enlisted — transt'd 
to Co. F, S2d P. Y — mustered 
out July 13, '65 — Yet. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
'62, and at Cold Harbor, June 
1, '64 — re-enlisted and trans- 
ferred to Co. F, S2d P. Y. — 
discharged July 13, '65 — Yet. 

Wounded at Bottoms Bridge 
June, '62 — transferred to Co. 
D. nth Yet. Res. Corps- 
discharged Sept. 2, '64. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate Feb., '62. 

Injured by railroad 
Aug., '62 — died at 
phia, Sept. 9, '62. 

Transferred to Co. R, 23d P.Y. 

Discharged on Surgeon'scertifi- 
cate Aug., '62. 

Promoted to Com. -Sergeant, 
23d P. Y. 

Wounded at Marye's Heights 
May 3, '63, and Petersburg 
April 2/65 — re-enlist. — trans- 
ferred to Co. F, S2d P. V.— 
discharged July 13, '65 — Yet. 

Drafted — transferred to Co. F, 
_82d P. Y — disch. July 13/65. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certifi- 
cate Nov., '61. 

Mus'd out with Co. Sept. S,'64. 

Drafted — transferred to Co. F, 
S2d P.Y. — discharged July 13, 

Wounded at White Oak Swamp 
June, '62 - trans, to U. S. X. 

Transferred to Co. F. , S2d 
P. Y. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certifi 
cate March, '62. 

K'd at Cold Harbor June 1 ,'64. 

Captured — died while prisoner 
at Harrisonb'gjVa., Sep., '62. 

I (eserted June. '62. 

Wounded at Cold Harbor — re- 
enlisted — transferred to Co. 
82d P. Y. 

Must'd out with Co. Sept. 8, 

Must'd out with Co.Sept. 8,' 

Drafted — transferred to Co. 
82d P. V. 

I (rafted— transferred to Co. 
s>d P. Y. 

Drafted — transferred to Co. 
S2d P. Y. 



'64. 
•64. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



I'Ol 







Date 




f. 

X 

-- 


\ \ M 1 


Rank 


01 Musi 


:r 


1 






in i.i Service 


X 










f- 


Hibberd, George . 


Private . 


Sept. 15, 


•62 


3 


Hough. Wm. J. . . 


" 


Aug. 2. 


'6l 


3 


Hahn, Frank B. . 


•■ 


Aug. 2, 


•61 


3 


Hillebrand, G. . . 


.. 


Aug. 2, 


'61 


3 


Hart, Mortimer . . 




An-. 2. 


'61 


3 



Hasenack, Peter . 
Hoffman, Chas. A. 
Jones, William E. 
James, William . . 



Johnson, Wm. P. . 

Keyser, Byron E. 
Kilpatrick. Wm. J. 



Key, John C. . 
Kneese, Jacob 
Leibrick, John 

Lang, Andrew 



Leary, John 



Lampter, Louis . 

Mooney, John. . 
Morris, Fritz . . 

Martin, Samuel \\ 
Martin, Crawford 
Moltzie, Philip . 

Monell, Randolf S 
Moltz, George. . 

Miller, George . 
Miller, Gotleib . 
Milton, John . . 
Miller, William . 
Mattice, Leon . . 
Mahern, Petei. . 
Magee, John S. . 
McMillin, Rob't. 



McCann, Thos. H. 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 

Aug. 



Aug. 

Aug. 
Aug. 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



Sept. 



Aus 



61 
61 

61 



•61 



•61 3 
' 6l 3 



'61 7 

61 3 



Feb. 1. '64 



•62 



•61 



Aug 


2, 


'61 


3 


Aug. 


26, 


'6i 


3 


Aug. 


2, 


'61 


3 


Aug. 


2, 


'6i 


3 


Aug. 


7. 


•63 


3 


Aug. 


2, 


'6l 


3 


Aug. 


26, 


'62 


3 


Aim. 


8, 


'63 


3 


Aug. 


7. 


'63 


3 


July 


27, 


•63 


3 


Jan. 


1, 


'62 


3 


Jan. 


18, 


'63 


3 


Aug. 


7. 


'63 


3 


Aug. 


2, 


•61 


3 


Aug. 


2, 


•61 


3 



Aug. 



•61 3 



Transferred to Co. F, 82d P.V. 
— wounded at Cold Flarbor 
June 1, '64 — dis. June 17, '65. 

Re-enlisted — transferred to Co. 
F, S2d P.Y. — discharged July 
13. '65— Vet. 

Wounded at Malvern Hill July 
1, '62 — discharged on Sur- 
geon's certificate Aug., '62. 

Deserted July, 1S62. 

Wounded at Malvern Hill. July 
1, '62 — deserted Sept., '62. 

Deserted Feb., '62. 

Absent, sick, at muster-out. 

Absent, in arrest, at muster-out. 

Wounded at Malvern Hill July 
1, '62 — discharged on Surg, 
certificate Nov., '62. 

Wounded at White Oak Swamp 
June, '62 — discharged on Sur- 
geon's certificate Oct., '62. 

Accidentally killed at Washing- 
ton, I). C, Feb., '62. 

Wounded Malvern Hill July 1, 
'62— killed at Cold Harbor 
June 1, '64. 

Deserted Aug., '62. 

1 )rafted — deserted. 

Wounded at Cold Harbor June, 
'62 — absent at muster-out. 

Transferred to Co. F, 82d P.V. 
—Died at York, Pa., Nov. 

7. '64- 
Wounded at Salem Heights 

May, '63 — transferred to Vet. 

Res. Corps. 
I lischarged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate March, '63. 
Mus'd out with Co. Sept. 8, '64. 
Transferred to Co. F, S2d PA'. 

— discharged June 17, '65. 
Disch. on Surg. cer. Sept., '61. 
Disch. on Surg. cer. July, '62. 
Drafted — killed at Mine Run 

Nov. 31, '63. 
Deserted July, '62. 
Wounded at Gettysburg July, 

'63 — deserted May, '64. 
Drafted — deserted Aug., '63. 
Drafted — deserted Aug., '63. 
Drafted — deserted. 
I (eserted Jan., '64. 
I )raf ted — deserted . 
Drafted — deserted Oct., '63. 
Not on muster-out roll. 
Wounded at Mine Run Nov. 

31, '63 — mustered out with 

Co. Sept. 8, '64. 
Killed at Fair Oaks May 31, '62. 



202 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



McConnel' 



jhn 



McNeal, Sam'l F. 
McDonough, A. 
McGowan, Geo. . 
( )'.\*eil, Dennis. . 
Peacock, Henry C. 



Paul, James . 

Poe, Chas. A. ' 
Ouein, Jacob C. 



Ridgway, Wm. . 

Robinett, Allen M 

Rehn, Edwin J. . 
Ruoflf, Henry . . 

Roessler, Henry 
Sewell, James . 

Snowden, Thos.W 
Sproul, James J. 
Sharp, Joseph. . 

Soov, John A. . 
Smith. Geo. W. 

Smith, John C. . 
Shaw, Charles L. 
Stout, C. M . . . 

Tompkins. John C . 
Thompson, Sam'l. 

Thompson, S. C. 

Taber, Jos. S. C. . 

Thatcher, H. G. . 

Thayer, Alvin E. . 

Thompson, Chas. 

Tudor, John F. . . 
Thalheimer, A. . 



Ulrich, John B. . . 
Von Linden, Ant'n 



Private 



Dati 

01-" Mrs i l R 
into Service 


< 
- 
> 

S 








u 
■— 


Aug. 


2, 


'6l 


3 


Aug. 
Aug. 
Mch. 
Aug. 
Aug. 


2, 
2, 

18, 

10, 
2, 


'6i 
'6i 
'64 
'63 
•61 


3 
3 
3 

3 
3 


Aug. 


2, 


'6i 


3 


April 
Aug. 


12, 
2, 


'64 
'61 


3 
3 


Aug. 


2 


'61 


3 


Sept. 


15. 


'62 


3 


Aug. 
Sept. 


2 

3. 


'61 
•62 


3 
3 


Aug. 
Aug. 


2, 
2, 


'61 
'61 


3 
3 


Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 


2, 
2, 

9. 


'61 
'6i 
'6i 


3 

3 

5 


Aug. 
Aug. 


2, 
2, 


'61 
'61 


3 

3 


Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 


2 
2 
2, 


'61 
'6i 
'61 


3 
3 

3 


Aug. 

Aug. 


2, 
2, 


•61 
•61 


3 
3 


Aug. 


2, 


'6i 


3 


Aug. 


2, 


'61 


3 


Aug. 


2, 


'6i 


3 


Sept. 


3. 


'62 


3 


Aug. 


2, 


'61 


3 


Aug. 
Aug. 


2, 
2, 


'61 
'6i 


3 

3 


Aug. 

July 


2, 
15. 


'61 
•63 


3 

3 1 



D. C, 



'61. 



I )ied at Washington, 

Oct., '61. 
Deserted Feb., '62. 
Disch. on Surg. cert. Oct. 
Deserted April 1, '64. 
1 )rafted — deserted. 
Wounded at Turkey Bend June 

30, '62 — mustered out with 

Co. Sept. 8, '64. 
Wounded at Funkstown July, 

'63 — trans. to Yet. Res. Corps. 
Not on muster out roll. 
Re-enlisted — transferred to Co. 
, 82d P. V. — discharged 

July 13, '65. — Yet. 
Transferred to Provost Guard, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Transferred to Co. F, 82d P. Y. 

— discharged Jan. 10, '65. 
Disch. on Surg. cert. July, ''12. 
Died at Falmouth, Ya., Feb. 

15, '°3- 
Deserted July, '62. 
Wounded Marye's Heights May 

3/63 — mustered out with Co. 

Sept. 8, '64. 
Must'd out with Co. Sept. 8/(14. 
Must'd out with Co. Sept 8,'64_ 
Wounded at Cold Harbor June 

1, '64 — discharged Sept. 4/64. 
Disch. on Surg. cert. Jan., '63. 
Died at Washington, D. 

Dec, '6i. 
Deserted June, '62. 
Disch. on Surg. cert. May, 
Wounded — discharged on Surg. 

certificate June, '62. 
Transferred to Adj. -Gen. office. 
Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 

'62 — trans, to Adj. Gen. office. 
Wounded June 15, '62 — must'd 

out with Co. Sept. 8, '64. 
Re-enlisted — transferred to Co. 

I', 82d P V. — discharged July- 
iS. '65.— Yet. 
Re-enlisted — transferred to Co. 

!•', N2d P. V. — discharged July 

13. '65.— Vet. 
Transferred to Co. P, 82d P. \ . 

— discharged June, '65. 
Discharged by civil authority 

Feb., '63. 
Disch. on Surg. cert. July, '62. 
Wounded and captured at Cold 

Harbor June 1, '64. — disch'd 

June 10, '65. 
Absent — sick at muster-out. 
I >rafted — deserted. 



C. 



'62. 



PENNSYLVANIA V< lU'NTKKk INI AXTKY. 



203 







Dati 


Hi 

< 

- 
> 




Name 


Rank 


of Muster 


1 


Kl MARKS 






INTO 


^1 RV1I I 


_ 




Weber, < Ittir^t' . . 


Private . 


Aug. 


2, '6l 


3 


Wounded at Malvern Hill July 
1/62 — mustered out with Co. 
Sept. 8, '64. 


Wilkins, Alex P. 


" 


Aug. 


2, '6l 


- 


Must' d out with Co. Sept. 3,'64. 


Williams, John . . 




Aug. 


2, '6l 


3 


Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
'62 — absent, sick atmust.-out. 


Wagner, Benj. F. . 


" 


Sept. 


I, '6i 


3 


Transferred to Signal Corps. 


Weaber, John . . 


" 


Aug. 


2, '6l 




Killed at Fair Oaks June 1, '62. 


Weber, Henry . . 


" 


Aug. 


2, '6l 


3 


I'ied at Washington, D. C, 
1 >ec, "6 1. 


Weaver, Charles . 


" 


A tig. 


2, '6l 


2 


Wounded at Malvern Hill July 












1, '62 — deserted Oct., '62. 


Wartenberg, Louis 


" 


Aug. 


ii, '6^; 


3 


Drafted — deserted Aug., '63. 


Williams, K. IS. . 


" 


Aug. 


2, '6l 




I leserted '62. 


Watson, George . 


1 1 


Mar. 


IS, '64 


3 


Deserted April 1, '64. 


Wilson, Edward B. 




Aug. 


2, '6l 


3 


Promoted to Sergeant-Major 
June 1, '62. 


Walters, Albert II. 




Aug. 


2, '61 


3 


Promoted to 1st. Lieut.. Co. I >, 
tiSth Pa. Infantry — dischar'd 
Captain and Bv. Maj , Feb. 










13. ' 5 5- 


Woodward, E, W. 




Aug. 


2, '61 


3 


I )ischarged on Surgeon's cer- 
tificate; date unknown. 


Zimmerman, H. C. 




Sept. 


3, '6j 


3 


Re-enlisted — transferred to Co. 
F, 32d P.V. — discharged July 
13. '65— Vet. 



COMPANY C 

RECRUITED AT PHILADELPHIA 



Adolph F. Cavada Captain . Aug. 1, '61 



John R. Johnson . 1st Lieut. Aug. 2, '61 



Thos. K. Boggs . . Aug. 2, '61 

John B. Fassett . . Aug. 2, '61 

Frank A. Lynch . 2d Lieut. Aug. 2, '61 



Sebastian F'ischler 1st Sgt. . Aug. 2, '61 



Charles Fogle 



Sept. 1, '61 



John C. Ames . . Sergeant Aug. 2, '61 



John Don Carlisle 
James P. Collins . 



Aug. 
Sept. 



2, '61 
i,'6i 



3 Detached, July, 1S62, on Gen. 
Humphrev's Staff — appoint'd 
Bv. Maj. 'and Bv. Lt. Col. 
March ij, 1S65. 

3 Promoted to 1st Lt., July iS, 
1S62 — detached on Gen. Sha- 
ler's Staff. 

3 Promoted to Adjt., March i,'62. 

3 Pr. to Capt. Co. F, Julv 18, '62. 

3 Pr. from 1st Sgt. Co. D, July iS, 
1862 — wd. at Cold Harbor, 
June 1, 1S64 — detached as 
Com. Hosp. Dept., June 7, 
[864 — discharged Sept., 1S64. 

3 Wd. Cold Harbor, June 1/64 — 
re-enlisted — trans, to Cos. F 
and I, 82d P. V. — disch. July 
13, 1865— Vet. 

3 Wd. at Gettysburg, July 3, '63 — 
re-enlisted — trans, to Co. F, 
82d P. V. — disch. July 13, 
1S65— Vet. 

3 Died at Alexandria. \'a., June 
18, 1S64, of wounds received 
at Cold Harbor ; grave, 2172. 

3 Died at Portsmouth, June 26, 
1S62. 

3 1 Promoted to Sgt., Aug. 2/62 — 
mus. out with Co., Sept. S/64. 



:204 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 




Datk 

of Muster 

into Service 



Remarks 



William R. Little . Sergt. . 

Joseph H. White . 

August Wilhelm . 

Nicholas Dorsey . Corporal 

Charles Ellenger 

John E. Little . 

John Lapp .... 



James Lesage . . 

Charles F. Losch . 
John McCabe . . 

Jos. A. Matharson 
Albert G.Russell . 
Gottlieb Staiger . 
Matthew Spence . 

Samuel Weeks . . 



Aug. 2, '61 



Aug. 2, '61 



Aug 



Richard McCabe . 
Ascough, John I!. Private 
Ackley, George B. 
Ayres, Thomas . . 



Sept. 

Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 



Sept. 


i, 


'6i 


3 


Sept. 


i, 


•6i 


3 


Sept. 


i, 


'6i 


3 


Aug. 


2, 


'6i 


3 


Aug. 


2, 


'6i 


3 



2, '6l .5 





Aug. 


2, '6l 


3 


" 


Sept. 


i,'6i 


3 


'■ 


Aug. 


2, '6l 


3 


'• 


Aug. 


2, '6i 


3 


" 


Aug. 


2, '6l 


3 


" 


Aug. 


2, '6l 


3 



Aug. 2, '62 3 



William Thomas . Music, . Sept. i,'6i 



i. '6i 
i, '6] 
i, '6i 

I. '<>! 



Promoted to Sgt., June 18, 1864 
— vvd. at Cold Harbor, June 
i, i 1864 — mustered out with 
Co., Sept. 8, 1864. 

Pr. to Corp., Nov. 1, 1861 — to 
Sgt., Sept. 1, 1862 — wounded 
at Cold Harbor, June 1, '64 — 
mus. out with Co., Sept. 8/64. 

Discharged on Surg, certificate, 
Sept., 1862. 

Re-enlisted — transferred to Co. 
F, 82d P.Y. — discharged July 
13. 1865— Yet. 

Discharged Aug. 20, 1862, for 
wounds received at Malvern 
Hill, July 1, 1862. 

Promoted to Corp. Aug. 8,'6i — 
killed at Cold Harbor, June 
1, 1864. 

Wounded at Malvern Hill, July 
1, '62, at Salem Heights, May 
3, '63, and at Gettysburg, July 
3, 1863 — Promoted to Corp., 
Nov. 1, 1S61 — mus. out with 
Co., Sept. 8, 1864. 

Wd. at Fair Oaks, May 31, 1862 
— promoted to Corp., June iS, 
1864 — mustered out with Co., 
Sept. 8, 1864. 

Discharged on Surg, certificate, 
Jan., 1S63. 

Pr. to Corp., Oct. 8, 1861— wd. 
and captured at Cold Harbor, 
June 1, 1864 — disch.Oct.8,'64. 

Re-enlisted— kill' d at Cold Har- 
bor, June 1, 1864 — Vet. 

Re-enlisted— killed at Cold Har- 
bor, June 1, 1864 — Yet. ! 

Promoted to Corp., June 1, Ve- 
rmis, out with Co., Sept.8,'64. 

Pr. to Corp., June 1, 1864 — ml, 
at 1 lettysburg, July 3, [863, 
and at Cold Harbor, June 1. 
[864 mustered out with Co., 
Sept. 8, [864. 

Wd. at Malvern Hill, July 1, 
1862— Pro. to Corp., Sept, to, 
1863 — mustered out with Co., 
Sept. 8, [86 1, 

Captured at Stone Mi., Sept., 
1863 — escaped from 1 )anville, 
Va. — mustered out with Co., 
Sept. 8, [864. 

Mus. out with Co., Sept, 8, '64. 

Mus. oui with Co., Sept 8, '64 

I (isch. on Surg. cert., [an. , ,o,'62. 

Wd. at Malvern Hill, July 1, 
[862 — disch. on Surg, cert., 
I )ec. 15, [862. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUN" 



INFANTRY. 



205 



N VMI 



Blumb, John F. . 
Brown, John . . . 
B nvers, John . . . 
Brown, Charles H. 



Brooks, Henry . . 
Baxter, Edward. . 

Branan, Michael. . 
Bruner, John H . . 
Bullock, Thos. F. . 

Callahan, John . . 
Chadwick, I. Thos. 
Cassaday, Nicholas 



Craig, Charles . . 
Campbell, Levi . . 



1 'onell, Ezekiel . . 
Dorsey, Thomas. 

Dorsey, William . 

Dubois, Henry. . . 
Dunlevy, Louis. . 
Elliott, Washing'n. 
Elliott, Robert . . 

Everhardt, Wm. . 

Earner, Thomas . 

Eberling, August . 

Elluanger, David. 
Fell, Thomas . . . 
Flood, William . . 



Forbes, William. 
Fouler, Charles 
Ford, William. . 

Garrigan, James 

Gardiner, John . 




Dati 

o] Muster 

into Servici 



Private 



Sept 
Feb. 

Jan. 
Dec. 



Sept. 
Dec. 

Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 



I, '61 


3 


2, '62 


3 


5, '64 


3 


6, '61 


3 


i,'6i 





tS> '"' 3 



I, 


'61 


3 


I, 


•61 


3 


I, 


'61 


3 


I, 


'61 


3 


I, 


'61 


3 


I, 


'61 


3 



Dec. 

Aug. 



Sept. 
Sept. 



15, '62 
2, '61 



1, '61 
1, '61 



Sept. 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Sept. 



Sept. 
Sept. 

Aug. 

Aug. 
Aug. 
Sept. 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Sept. 

I Aug. 

Sept. 



Sept. 1, '62 3 



1, '6r 
2/61 
1. '6i 
1, '6i 



1, '61 

1, '61 
10, '63 

2, '61 
2, '6i 
1, '61 



2, '61 
2, '61 

1, '6i 

2, '61 
I, '61 



Wounded — discharged 011 Surg. 

cert., Nov. 10, 1862. 
Transferred — wounded at Cold 

I larbor, June 1, 1864. 
Trans. — wd. at Petersburg, July 

1, 1864. 
Re-enlisted — transferred to Co. 

I •', 82d P. V. — wd. at Marye's 

Heights, May 3, 1863— disch. 

July 13, 1865— Vet. 
Deserted, Dec, 1861. 
Killed at Marye's Heights, May 

3. 1*63 
Deserted, Dec, 1S61. 
Deserted, Dec, 1S61. 
Disch. on Surg. cert, of dis'y. 
Mus. out with Co., Sept. 8, '64. 
Mus. out with Co., Sept. 8, '64. 
Re-enlisted — trans, to Co. F, 

■S2il P. V. — wounded Marye's 

Heights, May 3, 1863 — disch., 

July 13, 1S65— Yet. 
Transferred 
Wounded at Gettysburg, July 

3, 1863— killed at Cold Har- 
bor, June 1, 1864. 
Mus. out with Co., Sept. 8, '64. 
Re-enlisted — trans, to Co. F, 

S2d P.V. — discharged Julv 1 3, 

1865— Vet. 
Transferred to Co. F, 82d P. V. 

— discharged June 17, 1865. 
Deserted Dec, 1861. 
Deserted Dec, iS6r. 
Mus. out with Co. Sept. 8, 1S64. 
Wounded at Cold Harbor June 

3, 1864 — mustered out with 

Co. Sept. 8, 1S64. 
Wounded at Cold Harbor June 

1, 7864 — discharged Sept., '64. 
Died at Washington, D. C, 

Jan., 1862. 
Drafted — drowned at John- 
son's Island, March, 1864. 
Deserted December, iS6t. 
Mus. out with Co. Sept. 8, 1864. 
Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 

'62 — discharged on surgeon's 

certificate of disability Sept., 

1862. 
Deserted Oct 13, 1862. 
Deserted Dec, 1S61. 
Mustered out with Co. Sept. 8, 

1864. 
Killed at Cold Harbor June 1, 

1864. 
Wounded and captured at Cold 

Harbor June 1, '64— released 

Feb. 26, 1S65 — discharged 

March 30, 1S65. 



200 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



Dati 

of Muster 
into Servii I 



Remarks 



Gallagher, Thos. . Private 

Gampwell, John . 
Galloway, Geo.W. 

Gallagher, James . 
Gilbert, Thomas . 



Harrison, Wilson . 
Henry, David . . 

Hahn, John . . 

Henry, James . . 

Hanson, Robert . 

Henry, Patrick . . 

Hays, Charles F. . 
Hagerty, Dennis F. 

Honsner. John . . 
Harding, Hamilt'n 

I In nter, David . . 
Jenners, J. W. B. . 

Johnson, Thomas. 
Kilrain, John . . . 
Kelly. Peter. . . . 
Kock, John .... 

Kimmey, 1 lenry . 
Keith, Jacob . . . 
Latch, Robert. . . 



Sept. 


i, 


'61 


3 


Sept. 


1, 


'61 


3 


Aug. 


2, 


'61 


3 


Sept. 


I, 


'6t 


3 


Sept. 


I, 


'61 


3 


Mar. 

Sept. 


'9> 
i, 


•64 
•61 


3 
3 


Aug. 


2, 


•61 


3 


Feb. 


5. 


•64 


3 


Sept. 


5, 


•61 


3 


Aug. 


29, 


'62 


3 


Sept. 
Aug. 


1, 
24. 


'6i 

'61 


3 

3 


Nov. 
Sept. 


15. 
1, 


'61 
'61 


3 
3 


Sept. 


t. 


'61 


3 


Aug. 


2, 


'61 


3 


Mar. 


M. 


•64 


3 


Sept. 


'• 


'61 


3 


Sepi 


1. 


'61 


3 


Sept. 


1, 


'6l 


3 


Sept. 


i , 


'(,1 


3 


Jan. 


28, 


•64 


3 



Aug. 2, '61 



Died June 10, 1S64, of wounds 
received at Cold Harbor June 
1, 1S64. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate Sept., 1S62. 

Wounded at Malvern Hill July 
1, 1862 — re-enlisted — trans- 
ferred to Co. F, S2d P V.— 
discharged July 13, '6s — Yet. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
1S62 — deserted July 30, 1862. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31. 
1862, and at Marye's Heights 
May 3, 1863 — dischar'd Sept., 
1.S64. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Mustered out with Co. Sept. 8, 
1864. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
1862, and at Cold Harbor, 
June 1, '64 — re-enlis'd — trans, 
to Co. F, S2d P. V.— disch. 
July 13. 1S65 — Yet. 

Wounded at Cold Harbor June 
1, 1864 — transferred to Co. !•', 
82d P.V. — Died at Salisbury, 
X. C. 

Re-enlisted — transferred to Co. 
F, 82d P.Y. — discharged July 
13. 1865— Yet. 

Transferred to Co. F, S2d P.V. 
and Yet. Res. Corps — disch. 
July 13, 1S63. 

Died at Camp ( '.raham, Jan., '62. 

Re-enlisted — deserted April 2;, 
1864— Yet. 

Deserted Dec, 1861. 

Wd. at Fair Oaks May 31, [S62, 
ami Marye's Heights May 3. 
[863 -discharged Sept.. [864 

Wd. at Cold 1 1 .11T > ir June 1, 
1864 -discharged Sept., 1864. 

Wounded at Cold I larbor June 
1. 1864 — re-enlisted -transfd 
to Co . 82d P. Y.— disch'd 
Jul\ i }, 1865- Vet. 

Transferred to Co. !•', 820" P.V. 
discharged luK 1 j, [865 

1 letai lied .is teamstel -disi lia'd 
Sept., 1S64. 

Detached to Ambulance Corps 
disc barged Sept., [864. 

Wounded and captured a I Cold 

Harbor [une 1. 1864 — dis- 
charged Feb, 25, [865. 
I lischarged on Surg, certificate, 

I i.e. ,'1861. 
Killed at Cold i larbor, June 1 , 

[864. 
Mus. out with Co., Sept. 8, [864, 



PENNSYLVANIA V( ILUN IT.F.R INFANTRY. 



207 



Dati > 

oi Muster | 

ini,. Seri 



Long, Andrew . . Private 
Lyons, Jeremiah . 
Laru, Asa .... 



Love. Thomas K 

Laurence, Milton. 
Layer, William . . 



Miller. Win. II . . . 
Malloy, John . . . 

Monckton, Step'n 



Miller, John 
Mullen, James . . 
Maguire, William. 

McFadden, Neal . 



Mr.Comb, Alex. . 
McClintock, I high 



McFeterage, John . 
McCoughel, Thos. 
McCusker, John . 
McBride, Dennis . 



McCabe, Thomas. 
Mcllvany, Patr'k. 
McDona'd, R. . . 



McAllister, John 



Niblower, Freder'k 
Nutt, James. . . 



O'Neal, John. 
Orr, John . . 



Sept. 

Sept. 

Sepl 



Sept. 

Sept. 
Sept. 



Aug. 

Sept. 

Aug. 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Sept. 

Sept. 



Sept. 

Sept. 



Feb. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 



Sept. 
Sept 
Aug. 



Sept. 



Sept. 
Aug. 



Aug. 
Aug. 



i. '6i 


3 


I, '6i 


3 


i. '6i 


3 


20, '62 


3 


1. '6i 


3 


1. >»i 


3 



2 
1, 


'6l 
•61 


3 
3 


2, 


'6l 


3 


10, 


'63 


3 


2, 


'6l 


3 


1, 


'6l 


3 


1, 


'6l 


3 


1, 
1, 


•6l 
'6l 


3 
3 


■ 1, 


•64 


3 


1, 


•6l 


3 


9, 


'6l 


3 


1, 


'6l 


3 


1, 

1, 


'6l 

'6] 

'63 


3 
3 
3 


1, 


•61 


3 


2, 


•61 

•61 


3 
3 


2, 


'6i 


3 


2, 


'61 


3 



Mus. out with Co., Sept. S, [864. 
Disch. mi Surg. cert. 01 dis'y. 
Re-enlisted — trans, to Co.' F, 

N21I I'. V. disch. July 1 j, 

1S65— Yet. 
Trans, to Co. F, S2d P. V.— 

disch. June 1 7, 1S65. 
Deserted Nov. 1S62. 
Wounded at Malvern Hill, July 

1, iSi->2 — disch. on Surg. cert. 

of disability. 
Mus. out with Co., Sept. S, 1864. 
Wounded at Cold Harbor, June 

1, 1S64 — disch. Sept., 1S64. 
Disch., Sept.. 1N62, for wounds 

received at Malvern Hill, July 

1, 1S62. 
Drafted — trans, to S2d P. V.— 

discharged. 
Killed at Cold Harbor, June 1 , 

1864. 

Wounded and captured at Cold 
Harbor, June 1, 1864 — died in 
Libby Prison of wounds. 

Wounded at Cold Harbor, June 
1, 1864 — mustered out with 
Co., Sept, 8, 1S64. 

Detached to Ambulance Corps. 

Wounded at Malvern Hill, |ulv 

1, 1S62 — mustered out with 
Co., Sept. 8, 1S64. 

Transferred to Co. F, 82d P. Y. 

— discharged, July 13, 186.S. 
Died June 9, 1862 — buried at 

Cypress Cem., L. Island, X. Y. 
Died at Alexandria, Va., Dec. 

15. 1862. 
Deserted Dec, 1861, sentenced 

3 years to Dry Tortugas — 

sentence remitted — honorably 

discharged, July 1, 1865. 
Deserted July 25, 1S62. 
Deserted July 25, 1.N62. 
Drafted — captured at Mine Run 

—died at Andersonville, Apr. 

28, 1864— grave 773. 
Hospital from Aug. 1, 1862, to 

July 10, 1863 — enlisted Co.H, 

1 2th U.S. Inf. — disch. Sept. 

2, 1864. 

Disch. on Surg, cert., Dec, '61. 
Re-enlisted — transferred to Co. 

F, s 2d P.Y. — discharged July 

1 v 1S63 — Yet. 
Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 

1S62 — disch'd on Surgeon's 

certificate Dec, 1S62. 
Re-enlisted — transferred to Co. 

F. S2d P. Y. — discharged as 

Corporal July 13. 1S65 — Yet. 



JUS 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



Name 



Thompson, G. W. 
Urban, Jacob . . . 



Van Brunt, T. W. 



1 1 \ ri 

or Muster 

into Service 






Remarks 



Orr, James .... Private 
Orterman, August. 



Pollock, James . . 
Pringle, James . . 

Price, H viand . . 
Reigler, Henry . ■ 
Seger, Samuel . . 

Spratt, Thomas . . 

Sayer, Wm. W. . 

Storm, Otto . . . 

Smith, Robert . . 

Stewart, Robert . 

Shehan, Michael . 
Storry, William . . 

Stewart, Charles 
Spencer, William . 
Thompson, James. 

Thompson, Wm. 

Thompson, John . 

Tipton, Chas. E. 



Keb. 20, '64 
Aug. [o, '63 

Sept. 1, '61 
Sept. 1, '61 

Sept. 1, '61 
Sept. i,'6i 
2, '61 

2, '61 

1, '61 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Sept. 



July 12, '63 3 

Mar. 14, '64 3 
Jan. 26, '64 3 



Sept. 1, '61 

Sept. 1, '61 

Aug. 2, '61 

Mar. 2S, '64 

Aug. 2, '61 

Aug. 2, '61 

Sept. 1, '61 

Sept. r, '61 



Mar. 1, '64 3 
Sept. 1, '61 3 

Aug. 2, '61 3 



White, Henry C. 


Sept 


I, '6l 


3 


Walworth, James . 


Sept. 


1. '()! 


3 


Warner, Martin 


Sept. 


I. '61 


3 


White, Alfred . . 


Sept. 


I, '6l 


3 


Wilson, Thos. M. 


Sept. 


I, '61 


3 


Wallace, Robert . 


Sept. 


1. "6i 


3 


Zimmerman, John 


Sept 


12, '61 


3 



Transferred to Co. F, 8>d P. Y. 
— discharged July 13, 1865. 

Drafted - transferred to Co. F, 
S2d P. Y. — discharged as 
Sergeant July 13. 1S65. 

Must, out with Co. Sept. 8,'6j. 

Killed at Marve's Heights May 

3, 1863- 

Deserted March 17, 1863. 

Absent at muster-out. 

Transferred to Haxamer's N. J. 
Battery. 

Wounded — Discharged on Sur- 
geon's certificate Nov. 24/62. 

Discharg'd for wounds receiv'd 
at Malvern Hill, July 1, 1862. 

Drafted — wounded at Cold Har- 
bor June 1, 1 S64— transferred 
to Co. F, 82d P. V. 

Transferred to Co. I*", 82d P.V. 
— discharged July 13, 1865. 

Transferred to Co. F, 82d P. Y. 
— discharged July 13, 1865. 

Deserted December, 1861. 

Re-enlisted — deserted Jan., '64 
— Yet. 

Absent, sick, at muster-out. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Wounded at Cold Harbor June 
1, 1S64 — disch. Sept., 1864. 

Mustered out with Co. Sept. s, 
1864. 

Re-enlisted— trans, to 82d P.Y. 
—disch. July 13, 1865— Vet. 

Captured Sept. 21, 1864— re- 
leased March 9, 1863— re-en- 
listed — transferred to 82d P. 
Y. — disch. June 15, '65 — Yet. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Died at Washington,!). C, Nov. 
14, 1861— buried Military Asy- 
lum Cemetery. 

Re-enlisted— deserted Aug. 2, 
1S64— Yet. 

Absent at muster-out. 

Wounded at Cold Harbor June 
1, 1864— disch. Sept., 1S64. 

Mustered out with Co. Sept. 
s, 1S64. 

I leserted Sept. 5, 1862. 
Deserted Dec, 1861. 
Mustered out with Co. 
Re-enlisted- transferred to Co. 

1", S2<1 P. Y. discharged 

July 13, 1865— Vet. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



2( I! I 



COMPANY D 

i El 11 mil AT PHILADELPHIA 



N v \i i 



Date 
oi Muster 

INTO ' 



Edwin Palmer . . Captain. . Aug. 21. '61 
Richard A. Griffith ist Lt . . Aug. 24, '61 

George Wood . . 



Aug. 2i, '61 3 



Mark Anthony . . 2d Lt 
Benj. S. Thomas . " 



Aug. 21, 
Aug. 2, 



'61 
'61 



John G. Boyd. . . " Aug. 24, '61 3 

Frank A. Lynch . ist Sgt . Aug. 21, '61 3 

1 S. Williams . . Aug. 21, '61 3 

John Bratton . . . Serg't . . Aug. 4, '61 3 



Win. E. Campbell 
Patrick Holland . 



Martin Lamop . . 

imasX Perkins 

George P. Mitchell 

Thos. J. Milliken . Corp 

Thos. Gibson . . 
Wm. Edwards . 



Il 


Aug. 2, '61 3 


" 


Sept. 3, '61 3 


" 


Aug. 3, '61 3 




Aug. 21, '6i 3 




Aug. 21, '61 3 


Corp . . 


Aug. 21, '61 3 


" 


Aug. 4. '61 3 


" 


Aug. 31, '61 3 



\\ ounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
1X62 — detached as Provost 
Mar. 2d List., at Phila., Pa. 
Promoted from 2d Lieut. Co. 
G, to ist Lieut Co. D., July 
15, 1862— wounded at Cold 
Harbor June 1, 1864 — mus. 
out with Co. Sept. 8, 1S64. 
Wounded at Fair ( >aks May 31, 
1862 — promoted to Captain 
Co. A., July 22, 1.S62. 
Discharged July 15, 1862. 
Died Feb. 9, 1862, at Washing- 
ton, D. C. 
Promoted from ist Serg. Co. 
G, to 2d Lieut., Co. D, Sept. 
11, 1862 -killed at Cold Har- 
bor June 1, 1864. 
Promoted to 2d Lieut. Co. C, 

July 18, 1862. 
Promoted from Serg. Juh 15, 
1862 — wounded at Gettysb'g, 
July 3, 1863 — mustered out 
with Co. Sept. 8, 1864. 
Wounded at hair Oaks May 31, 
1862, and Cold Harbor, June 
1, 1S64 — promoted to Sergt. 
April, 1S64 — mustered out 
with Co. Sept. 8, 1864. 
I lischarged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate June, 1S63. 
Re-enlisted — transferred to Co. 
H., 82d P. V. — wounded at 
Marye's Heights May 3, 1863, 
and at Cold Harbor June 1, 
'64 — disch. July 13, '65 -Yet. 
Promoted to Sergeant June, 
[863 — discharged Sept., 1864. 
Transferred to Co. C, 23d P. V, 

Oct., 1S61. 
Re-enlisted — transferred to Co. 
H, S2d P. V. — promoted to 
2d Lieut — discharged July 13, 
1865— Vet. 
Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
1862, and Cold Harbor June 
1, 1S64 — mustered out with 
Co. Sept. S, 1S64. 
Promoted to Corporal Nov., 
[863 — mustered out with Co. 
Sept. 8, 1864. 
Wounded at Fair Oaks — pro- 
moted to Corporal Feb., '64 — 
mus. out with Co. Sept. 8, '64. 



210 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



Date 
Rank ! of Muster 
into Service 



Isaac Wright . . . Corporal. 

Hinson Hollis . . | 
Patrick Farren . . 

Michael Sweeney. 

James Kelly . . . 
James McCune . . 

Wm. G. Grow . . 

Wm. Montgomery 

Charles Brown . . Muc. 
John McFadden . 



Anthony, John P. 
Anthony, Wm. H. 



Anderson, John . 
Albany, Andrew J. 

Allender, Wm. J. . 

Allison, Robert . . 
Burnett, Chas. F. 

Barr, Samuel . . . 

Berry, Lewis . . . 

Buchanan, James . 

Barnes, Geo. W. . 
Bardsley, William. 
Bradley, John F. . 

Barr, William . . 



Private 



Aug. 


6, 


•6l 


Aug. 

Nov. 


21, 

20, 


'6l 
'6l 


Aug. 


21, 


'6i 


Sept. 


3. 


'6i 


Sept. 


6, 


'61 


Aug. 


21, 


'61 


Aug. 


21, 


•6i 


Feb. 


4. 


'62 


Nov. 


26, 


'61 


Aug. 

Aug. 


21, 
21, 


'61 
'61 


Aug. 


21, 


'6i 


Aug. 


21, 


'61 


Jan. 


28, 


'63 



Aug. 21, '61 
Aug. 21, '61 

Aug. 21, '61 

Aug. 21, '61 

Aug. 4- '61 

Aug. 21, '61 
Sept. 1, '61 
Sept. 28, '61 



Aug. 21, '61 3 



Promoted to Corp. Feb., '64 — 

mus. out with Co. Sept. 8, '64. 
Hisch. on Surg. cert. Feb., '62. 
Transferred to Co. H, S2d P.V. 

— discharged Nov. 26, 1S64. 
Re-enlisted — transferred to Co. 

H, 82d P. V. — wounded at 

Cold Harbor, June 1, 1864 — 

discharged July 13, '65 — Yet. 
Transferred to Co. H. 82d P.V. 

— discharged Sept., 1S64. 
Transferred to Co. H, 82d P.V. 

— wound, at Marye's Heights 

May 3, '63 — disch. Sept., 1864. 
Promoted to Corp. March, '62 

— killed at Fair Oaks May 31, 

1S62. 
Promoted to Corporal Dec, '61 

— re-enlisted — killed at Cold 

Harbor June 1, 1864 — Yet. 
Transferred to Co. H, 82d P.Y. 

— discharged Feb., 1865. 
Transferred to Co. H, 82d P.V. 

— discharged Nov., 1864. 
Mus. out with Co. Sept. 8, '64. 
Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 

1862 — mustered out with Co. 

Sept. 8, 1S64. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate March, 1862. 
Re-enlisted — transferred to Co. 

H., 82d P. Y. — discharged 

July 13, 1S65 — Yet. 
Died at Johnson's Island Jan. 

18, 1864. 
Killed at Fair Oaks May 31, '62. 
Died Jan. 3, 1S63 — buried in 

Military Asylum Cem., I). C. 
Re-enlisted — transferred to Co. 

H, S2d P. V. — discharged 

July 13, 1865— Yet. 
Wounded Marye's Heights May 

3, 1S63 — mustered out with 

Co. Sept. 8, 1.S64. 
Wounded at Cold Harbor June 

I, 1.S64 — absent, sick, al mus- 
ter out. 

Discharged for wounds received 
at Fair Oaks May 31, 1S62. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certifi- 
cate Nov., [861. 

Wounded at Marye's Heights 
May 3, 1N63 -transferred to 
Yet. Res. Corps Jan., 1864 — 
discharged Sept., 1864. 

Re-enlisted— transferred to Co. 

II, s.'il P. V. - discharged 
July 13, 1865 — Vet. 



PENNSYLVANIA Vol IXTEER INFANTRY. 



211 



\ \MI 




Date 

op Muste K 
in i i ' Service 



Boyd, John .... 

Burton, Joseph . . 

Biles, Geo. M. W. 

Bennett, William . 
Boyle, John . . . 
Campbell, Alex. . 

Crawford, George. 
Cargill, John . . 
Caskey, Wm. G. . 



Collings, Wm. H. 
Campbell, James . 
Colligan, John . . 



Campbell, JohnM. 



Private . Aug. 21, '61 



Curry, John 



Crole, Robert . . 

Carnahan, Chas. . 

Currin, John . . 

Donelly, Hugh . . 

Dougherty, Geo. . 

Donohue, Edward 
Donelly, Daniel . . 
Fisher, Henry 
Finley, William . . 
Fisher, James . . 

Fox, John .... 
Gebhart, Wm. J. . 



Galbraith, John . . 

Gorman, James . . 
Gallagher, Charles 
Goulding, John . . 
Gallagher, Wm. . 

Holt, William. . . 

Harvey, Henry . . 



Jan. 18, '64 
Feb. 15, '64 



3 
3 

Aug. S, '63 3 
Sept. 3, '6i 3 
Aug. 4, '61 3 



Aug. 22, '61 3 
Aug. 4, '61 3 
Aug. 5, '6i 3 



Aug. 21, '61 3 
Aug. 21, '61 J 3 
Aug. 21, '61 



Aug. 21, '61 



Aug. ai, '61 



Aug. 10, '63 
July 27, '63 
Nov. 1, '63 
Sept. 4, '61 

Aug. 26, '61 

Aug. 21, '61 
Sept. 6, '61 
Aug. 21, '61 
Aug. 21, '61 
Sept. 2, '6i 

Aug. 21, '61 
Aug. 6, '61 



Sept. 3, '61 



Nov. 1, '63 
Aug. 10, '63 
Sept. 5, '61 

Aug. 21, '61 

Sept. 4, '61 



Feb. 15, '64 3 
3 
3 
3 



Re-enlisted — transferred to Co. 
H, S2d P. V.— wounded at 
Cold Harbor June 1, 1864 — 
discharged July 13, '65 — Yet. 

Transferred to Co. H., 82d P. 
V. — discharged Julv 13, 1S65. 

Transferred to" Co. H, 82d P. V. 
— discharged July 13, 1865. 

Deserted Aug., 1S63. 

Deserted March, 1S62. 

Wounded at Marye's Heights 
May 3, 1S63 — mustered out 
with Co. Sept. 8, 1864. 

Mustered out with Co. Sept. 8, 
1864. 

Mustered out with Co. Sept. S, 
1S64. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
1862, and at Cold Harbor 
June 1, '64 — disch. Sept., '64. 

Must, out with Co. Sept. S, '64. 

Discharged Jan., 1863. 

Wounded at Gettysburg, July 3, 
1863 — transferred to Veteran 
Res. Corps. 

Re-enlisted — transferred to Co. 
H., S2d P. V.— discharged 
July 13, 1865 — Yet. 

Re-enlisted — transferred to Co. 
H, .$2d P. V. — discharged 
July 13, 1S65 — Vet. 

Transferred to Co. H, 82d P.Y. 

Deserted Sept. iS, 1863. 

Deserted Nov. 29, 1S63. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate Nov., 1S61. 

Re-enlisted - transferred to Co. 
H, S2d P. V. 

Killed at Fair Oaks May 31, '62. 

Deserted Dec, 1861. 

Must, out with Co. Sept. 8, '64. 

Trans, to Co. K, Oct. iS, 1861. 

Transferred to Co. , 82d P.V. 
— discharged Sept., 1S64. 

Deserted Dec, 1S61. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
1S62 — mustered out with Co. 
Sept. 8, 1864. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
1862 — transferred to Co. , 
82dP. V.— disch. Sept., 1S64. 

Trans, to Co. , S2d P.Y. 

K'd at Cold Harbor June 1, '64. 

Deserted Sept. 14, 1S63. 

Re-enlisted — deserted May 8, 
1S64— Yet. 

Discharged for wounds received 
at Fair Oaks May 31, 1862. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate Oct., 1S61. 



212 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



N \ mi- 




Date 

OF Ml s I I I: 
INTO SE RVII I 



Houghs, Edward . Private 

Hughes, James . . 

Harvey, James D. 

Hogg, Charles . . 

Hattersley, Joseph 

Harmer, Edward . 

Hutchinson, Josh. 
James, John . . . 
James, William . . 

Kirkpatrick, John. 
Knight, John . . . 

Kelly, Samuel . . 

Kennedy, John H. 



Klein, Andrew . . 
Kipel, Lewis . . . 
Kates, Samuel . . 
Kelly, William . . 
Lafferty, John. . . 
Lawrence, Charles 
Moore, Washingt'n 
Marache, Chas. C. 

Morgans, Ered'k . 
Mason, 1 lamil'n P. 

Mullin, John 
McC.ee, Thomas . 



McCoy, Henry . 



McClung, John . . 

McGlinchv, James 
McCorkhill, Arch. 

Mii 'artney, Sani'l 

Mel tevitt, Edward 

M( ' lane, Samuel, 
Mil [em \ . < ierald. 

M>< loud, William 



Jan. 

Aug. 

Aug. 
[Feb. 
i Aug. 

Mch. 

Aug. 
' Jan. 

Aug. 
Feb. 

Sept. 
X..v. 



8, '64 3 
21, '61 3 
21, '61 

1, '64 
10, '63 
21, '64 
26, '61 
18, '64 



Aug. 2i, '61 3 W'd at Fair Oaks May 31, 1S62 

— trans, to Yet. Res. Corps. 

Aug. 26, '61 3 Discharged for wounds receiv'd 

at Fair Oaks May 31, 1862. 
Sept. 3, '64 3 Transferred to Co. H, 82d P.V. 

— discharged June 17, 1S65. 
Aug. 16, '62 3 Transferred to Co. H, 82d P. V. 

— discharged June 17, 1S65. 
Sept. 12, '62 3 Transferred to Co. II, 82d P.V. 

— discharged June 17, 1.S65. 
Feb. 20, '64 3 Transferred to Co. H, 82d P.V. 

— discharged July 13, 1865. 
Aug. 21, '61 3 Deserted Jan., 1862. 
Sept. 6, '61 3 Disch.by order of Pres. Lincoln. 
Sept. 5, '61 3 Transferred to Co. H, S2d P.V. 

— discharged Sept., 1864. 
Aug. 2, '61 3 Must, out with Co. Sept. 8, 1864. 
Sept. 6, '61 3 Discharged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate Nov., 1861. 
Sept. 5, '61 3 Transferred to Co. H, 82cl P.V. 

— discharged Sept., 1864. 
Aug. '61 3 Re-enlisted — transferred to Co. 
H, 82d P. Y. — discharged 
July 13, 1865— Vet. 
K'd at Cold Harbor June 1, '64. 
Deserted Jan., 1S62. 
Deserted March, 1S62. 
Not on muster-out roll 
Deserted May s, [864. 
Desert ed April t, 1S64. 
Wounded at Gettysburg July 3, 
1863 — discharged Aug. 2i,'6 |. 
Transferred to I'. S. Navy, '64. 
10, '63 3 Transferred to Co. H, 826 P.V. 
10, '64 3 Transferred to Co. H, 82d P.V. 
— discharged July 13, [865. 
3 1 leserted Nov., [862, 
3 Wounded at Fair I >aks May 31, 
1.N62 — transferred to Yet. Res. 
Corps, ( )ct., [863. 
Aug. 21, Y>i 3 Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
[862, and at Sailor's Creek 
April '), 1865 — re-enlisted 
transferred to 1 )o. 1 1, 82d P. 
V. — discharged July 13, [865. 
Sept. 3, '61 3 Wounded at Malvern Hill July 
1, 1862 — transfi rred to 82a 
P. V. -disch. Sept., 1864. 
Transferred to Co, II. 82d P.V. 
Transferred to Co. 11. s 2.l PA . 

— discharged [une 17, t86 ,. 
Transferred to Co. II, vd P.V. 

discharged July 13, t s, 'S. 

transferred to Co. II. vd P.V. 

-discharged [uly [3, [865. 
Killed .11 Fan 1 faks Maj |i, 
Diefa July 6, [864, of wounds 
received at Cold I [arbor 
buri d it Nat, < !em.,Wash'n. 
Aug. 10, '63 3 Deserted August, 1863. 



1, '6i 
20, '61 



Feb. 
Aug. 


23. 
12, 


'62 
'62 


3 
3 


Feb. 


18, 


•64 


3 


Feb. 


1' 1, 


'64 


3 


Sept. 

\ir 


4. 
21, 


'61 


3 
3 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



213 



Nami 




Dati 

'H Mi STER 

into Service 



Remarks 



McCormick, John 
Mel-'. ills. Francis 
McFree, Wm. . 
N<t K. Sam'l A. 
N( 'I'll-, Win. . . 
Percy, Frederick 
Powers. Michael J 

Rumney, John. . . 



Riley, Michael . 
Richardson, John . 



Rose, James . . 
Rit-bel, Jeremiah 

Riley, Benj. S. . 

Ryan, John . . 
Russell, Peter. . 
Shaw, Wm. . . 



Stem. Andrew E 
Smith, Wm. J. . 
Simons. Samuel 
Sweeney, John . 
Sterling, Thos. . 



Stephenson, Geo. 
Stewart, James . . 
Spallman, James . 
Toland, Neil] . . . 



Thwaite, Alfred 
Tippen, < George 



Tower, Michael 
Tapper, Joseph 
Taylor, John 
Winters, James 
White, John. . . 
Wiley, Samuel . 



Sept. i, '61 
Sept. 6, '61 



Aug. 10, '63 
Sept. 3, '61 

Jan. 20, '64 

Aug. 10, '63 
Aug. 8, '63 
Aug. 21, '61 



Aug. 21, '61 
Sept. 3, '61 
Aug. 21, '61 
Sept. S, '61 
Sept. S, '61 



Aug. 21, '61 
Aug. 8, '63 
Aug. 21, '61 
Sept. 8, '61 



Private . July is, '63 3 Deserted April, 1X64. 

Any. 21, '61 3 Deserted November, 1862. 
Aug. 21, '61 3 Not on muster-out roll. 
Aug. 6, '61 3 Mus. out with Co. Sept. 8, '64. 
Aug. 21, '61 \ Killed at Fair Oaks, May 31, '62. 
Aug. 8, '63 3 Deserted August 8, 1863. 
Aug. 21, '61 3 Wounded at Marye's Heights 
May 3, 1863 — des. Feb. 7, '64. 
Aug. 21, '61 3 Mustered out with Co. Sept. 8, 
[864— re-enlisted in Co. L, 
13th Pa. Cav. Feb. 27, 1S65 — 
discharged July 14. 1S65. 
3 Discharged for wounds received 
at Malvern Hill, July 1. 1S62. 
3 Wounded at Malvern Hill July 
1, 1862 — discharged on Sur- 
geon's certificate July, 1862. 
3 Transferred to U. S. Navy, 1S64. 
3 Transferred to Co. H, 82 - d P.V. 

dis. September, 1S64. 
3 Transferred to Co. H, 82d P.V. 

— discharged June 16, 1S65. 
3 j Deserted November 1, 1863. 
3 Deserted February, 1864. 
3 Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
i.S62,and at Cold Harbor June 
1, 1S64 — mustered out with 
Co. September S, 1864. 
Mustered out with Co. Sept. 8, 

1864. 
Discharged for wounds received 

at Fair Oaks May 31, 1862. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate March 1, 1862. 
Transferred to Co. H, 82d P.V. 

— discharged Sept., 1864. 
Re-enlisted — transferred to Co. 
H, S2d P. V.— discharged 
Sept., 1S64. 
Died at Yorktown May iS, '62. 
Deserted August iS, 1S63. 
Deserted Oct., 1862. 
Wounded at Marye's Heights 
May 3, 1S63 — transferred to 
Co. H, 82d P.V. — discharged 
Sept., 1S64. 
Sept. 4, '61 3 Transferred to Co. H, 82d P.V. 
— discharged Sept. 14, 1864. 
Aug. 21, '61 3 Re-enlisted — transferred to Co. 
H, S2d P.V. — discharged July 
13, 1865— Vet. 
Sept. 5, '61 3 Deserted March 8, 1862. 
Nov. 26, '61 3 Deserted Dec, 1 S63. 
Aug. 8, '63 3 Deserted Aug. 21, 1863. 
Aug. 3, '61 3 Mus. out with. Co. Sept. S, 1S64. 
July 13/63 3 Transferred to U. S. Navy, 1S64. 
Aug. 21, '61 3 Missing at Marye's Heights May 
}, 1863 — re-enlisted — trans- 
ferred to Co. H, 82d P. V.— 
discharged July 13/65. — Vet. 



214 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 




Remarks 



Wallace, Alex. . 
Winters, Hugh . 

Wein, John T. . 
White, Joseph. . 

Wilson, Chas. H. 

Winn, Anthony . 
Warren, Wtn. . 
Wilson, John. . 
Young, Joseph . 



Aug. 


24. 


'6l 


3 


Aug. 


10, 


'6.3 


3 


Aug. 


'O. 


'6.S 


3 


July 


27, 


'63 


3 



Re-enlisted — transferred to Co. 
H, 8 2 d P. V.— Yet. 

Missing Marye's Heights May 3, 
1863 — wounded at Cold Har- 
bor June 1, 1864 — transferred 
to Co. H, 82d P. V.— dis- 
charged Sept., 1S64. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
1862 — transferred to Co. H, 
82d P. V. — dis. Feb. 11, 1S65. 

Wounded at Marye's Heights 
May 3, 186} — transferred to 
Co. H, S2d P. V.— discharged 
Sept., 1864. 

Transferred to Co. H, 82d P.V. 
— discharged June, 1865. 

Killed at Fair Oaks May 31, '62. 

Deserted Aug. 20, 1863. 

Deserted Aug. 20, 1863. 

Drafted— transferred to Co. H, 
82d P. V.— dis. July 13, 1S65. 



COMPANY E 

RECRUITED AT PHILADELPHIA 



Win. J. Wallace . Captain . 



George Wood . 



William Clark 



Henry Rees, Jr. . . 1st Lieut. 
Wm. J. McFalls 



James Johnston . . 



Martin V. B. Hiller 

Wm. Kearney . . 

Henry Torbett . . 



2d Lieut. 
1 st Sgt. . 

Sergeant. 



Aug. 14, ' 



Aug. 21, 



Aug. 14, 



Aug. 
Aug. 



Aug. 
Aug. 



14. 
14. 



Aug. 14, 



14. 



Aug. 14, 



61 


3 


61 


3 


61 


3 


61 


3 


61 


3 


61 


3 


61 
61 


I 


61 


3 



Promoted to Maj. 23d P. \\, 
Dec. 13, 1S62 — wounded at 
Fair Oaks, May 31, 1862, and 
at Cold Harbor, June 1, 1864. 

Promoted to Capt., March 1, 
1863 — wounded at Fair Oaks, 
May 31, 1862 — resigned Mar. 
17, 1864. 

Promoted from Corp. to Sgt. — 
to 2d Lt., Dec. 20, 1862 — to 
Capt., Aug. 9, 1864 — trans, to 
S2d P. V. — disch. as Major, 
July 13, 1865. 

Promoted to Capt. Co. K, July 
20, 1S62. 

Promoted from 1st Sgt. to 2d 
Lt., Feb. 11, 1862; toistLt., 
July 20, 1S62— resigned Dec. 
29, 1862, on acct. of wounds 
received at Fair Oaks, May 
31, 1862. 

Promoted to 2d Lieut., July 20, 
1862 ; to 1st Lieut.. Dec. 29, 
1863 — wounded at Fair Oaks, 
May 31, 1862— killed at Cold 
Harbor, June I, 1864. 

Resigned Nov. 6, 1861. 

Promoted from Sgt. Dec. 29, 
t862 -mustered out with Co., 
Sept. 8, 1864. 

Promoted to iCorp. — to Sgt., 
Dec. 29, 1862— mustered out 
with Co., Sept. 8, 1S64. 



PENNSYLVANIA V( (LUNTEER INFANTRY, 



215 



Name 




Date 

01 Mi S I I R 

INTO SERVK i: 



Hugh McKinney 

Edvv. S. Morgan 

John Marshall . 

Robert Gordon . 
John McNeill . . 



George Robinson 
George Hance . 



John Miller . . . 
James McClung . 
John Stewart . . 

Win. Miller . . 

Robert Hayes. . 
James Arbuthnut 
John Waters . 
Wm. Dougherty 

John Biggot . . 
Wm. J. Baker . . 
James Brown . 

John Morgan . . 
George W. Fow 



Sergt. 



Aug. 

Aug. 
Aug. 



Aug. 
Aug. 



Aug. 

\ug. 



Corporal. Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



14. 


'61 


14, 


'61 


14. 


'62 


14. 
14, 


'61 

•61 


14. 
14. 


'6i 
'61 


I4> 


'61 


14. 


'61 


14. 


'6i 


14, 


'61 


14. 


'61 



14, '61 

14. '61 
14, '61 



Aug. 14, '61 



Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 
Aug. 



14, '61 
14, '61 

14, '6i 
14, '61 



Promoted to Corp. — to Sgt., 
Feb. 2S, 1863 — mustered out 
with Co., Sept. 8, 1864. 

Promoted to Corp. — to Sgt., 
March 1, 1864 — mus. out with 
Co., Sept. 8, 1864. 

Promoted to Sgt., June 1, 1864 
—trans, to Co. E., 82d P. V. 
— disch. July 5, 1S65. 

Died at Phila., Jan. 8, 1862. 

Promoted from Corp., March 
1, 1864— killed at Cold Har- 
bor, June 1, 1S64. 

Deserted March 3, 1863. 

Re-enlisted — trans, to Co. E, 
82d P. V.— disch. July 13, 
1S65— Vet. 

Died at Washington, D. C, 
Dec. 27, 1861. 

Died at Washington, D. C, 
Dec. 25, 1861. 

Re-enlisted — trans, to Co. E, 
82d P. V.— disch. July 13, 
1865— Vet. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks, May 
31, 1S62— died Aug. 16, 1862, 
of wounds received at Mal- 
vern Hill, July 1, 1862. 

Transferred to Co. R, 23d P. 
V., Nov. 10, 1861. 

Mustered out with Co., Sept. 
S, 1S64, as private. 

Promoted to Corp. July 20, '64 
mus. out with Co.,Sept.8.'64. 

Promoted to Corp. Dec. 29, 
1862— mustered out with Co., 
Sept. S. 1S64. 

Promoted to Corp. Feb. S, '62 
— wounded at Cold Harbor, 
June 1, 1864 — mus. out with 
Co., Sept. 8, 1864. 

Promoted to Corp. Feb. 28, 
1862— wounded at Cold Har- 
bor, June 1, 1864— mus. out 
with Co., Sept. 8, 1864. 

Promoted to Corp. March 1, 
1S64 — wounded at Fair Oaks, 
May 31, 1862, and at Cold 
Harbor, June 1, 1864— mus. 
out with Co., Sept. 8, 1864. 
3 Promoted to Corp. June 1, 1 S64 
— re-enlisted — trans, to Co. E, 
82d P. V.— disch. July 13, 
1865— Vet. 
3 Promoted to Corp. June 1, 1864 
— re-enlisted — trans, to Co. 
E, 82d P. V.— disch. July 13, 
1865— Vet. 



216 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



Date 

of Muster 

into Service 



Hugh McMichael . Corporal. Aug. 14, '61 



John Dougherty , 
Wm. S. Davis 
Wm. Keys .... 



Daniel S. Agnew . Musician. 
James Tate .... " 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 

Aug. 
Aug. 



14, '61 

14. '61 
14,' 61 

14, '61 
14. '61 



Acton, James B. . 

Buchanan, James . 
Boyd, John .... 
Blessington, James 



Boyd, Hugh . . . 
Brooks, Joseph . . 
Braceland, Patrick 

Buchanan, William 

Brown, Thomas C 

Broun, James S. 

Boals, John . . . 
Burke, John C, 
Bendle, Jonah. . 
Brown, Thomas 
Burk, John A. . 



Collins, Robert . 
Clark, John E. . 

Corn, Lawrence 



■"rivate . Aug. 14, '61 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 

Aug. 

Nov. 



14, '61 
14, '61 
14, '61 



14, '6i 
14. '61 
14, '61 

18, '62 

1, '62 



Sept. i, '61 



Feb. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 

Aug. 



Aug. 
Aug. 



26, '64 
14, '61 
14, '61 
14, '61 
14, '61 



14, '61 
14, '61 



Aug. 14, '61 



Wounded at Fair Oaks, May 
31, 1862, and at Cold Harbor 
June 1, 1S64 — pro. to Corp. 
June 1, 1864 — re-enlisted — 
trans, to Co. E, 82d P. V. — 
disch. July 17, 1865 — Yet. 

Promoted to Corp. Dec. 27, '61 
— killed at Fair < >aks, May 
31, 1S62. 

Promoted to Corp. Aug. 20, '62 
— killed at Cold Harbor, June 
1, 1864. 

Promoted to Corp. March 1/64 
— re-enlisted — wd. and cap- 
tured at Cold Harbor, June 1, 
1S64— trans, to Co. C, 82d P. 
V. — disch. July 17,1865 — Yet. 

Re-enlisted — '■ wd. on picket, 
Petersburg, Ya., Dec. 16/64 
— trans, to S2d P. V. 

Mustered out with Co., Sept. 8, 
1864 — re-enlisted Nov. iS, 
1S64, in Co. L, 2d Conn. Lt. 
Art. — disch. June 16, 1S65. 

Wd. at Cold Harbor, June i,'64, 
mus. out with Co. Sept. S,'64. 

Mus. out with Co., Sept. 8, '64. 

Mus. out with Co., Sept. 8, '64. 

Mus. out with Co., Sept. S, '64, 
re-enlisted L". S. Navy Sept. 
30, '64— disch. March 1864. 

Mus. out with Co. , Sept. 8, '64. 

Mus. out with Co., Sept. 8, '64. 

Disch. on Surg, cert., Dec. 3d, 
1861. 

Disch. on Surg, cert., March 
20, 1863. 

Wounded at Marye's Heights, 
May 3, 1863 — trans, to Co. E, 
82 P. Y.— disch. July 13, 1865. 

Trans, from Co. G, 1862 — re-en- 
listed — trans, to S2d P. Y. — 
disch. July 13, 1S65 — Vet. 

Trans, to 82d P. Y. — disch. 
July 13, 1865. 

Trans, to Battery II, 1st U. S. 
Art., June 15, [863. 

Died at Washington, D. C, 
Feb. 26, iS(.2. 

Died at Bottoms Bridge, Ya., 
May 30, 1862. 

Wounded at Pair Oaks, May 
31, 1S62— killed at Cold Har- 
bor, June 1 , 1864. 

Mus. out with Co., Sept. s, '64. 

Wounded at Cold I [arbor, June 

1, 1S64 — disch. Sept. iN<>4. 
Wounded at Malvern Hill, July 
1, 1862— disch. on Surg, cert., 

Aug. 22, IS(,2. 



PENNSYLVANIA V( (LUNTEER INFANTRY. 



217 




i > \ 1 1 
o] Muster 
into Si 



Carr, Charles . . . 
Clark, George . . 

Carroll, John . . . 

Doak, Robert . . . 
Disart, Robert . . 
Duddy, James . . 

Dougherty, Henry 

Davis, Andrew . 
Donnelly, Daniel 
Donohue, Robert 

Egner, Robert . 

Fleming, William 
Furnace, William 

Fow, Daniel . . 

Foh, William . 

Finley, William . 



Gibson, James . . 
Gilbert, John . . . 
Hanna, Robert. . 
Hance, Charles . . 



Hannan. John. 



Private 



Mar. 3, 
Aug. 14, 

Jan. 1, 

Aug. 14, 
Aug. 14, 
Aug. 14, 

Aug. 14, 

Sept. iS, 
Aug. 14, 
Aug. 14, 

Aug. 14, 

Aug. 14, 
Aug. 14, 

Aug. 14, 

Aug. 1, 



•64 




•61 


3 


'62 


3 


'61 
61 
•61 


3 
3 
3 


61 


3 


62 


3 


61 


3 


61 


3 


61 


3 


61 
61 


3 
3 



'61 3 
62 3 



Oct. 28, '62 3 



Aug. 14, 
Aug. 14, 
Aug. 14, 
Aug. 14, 



61 3 

'Sil 3 
61 3 
61 3 



Aug. 14, '61 3 



Hennessey, John . " 


Aug. 14, '61 


3 


Henderson, John . " 


Oct. 13, '62 


3 


Hotman, George . 


Oct. 17, '62 


3 


Helfridge, George 


Aug. 14, '61 


3 


Hamilton, Robert. 


Aug. 14, '61 


3 


Humes. John ... " 


Oct. 13, '62 


3 


Higgins, Charles . 


Aug. 14, '61 


3 



Trans, to Co. E, 82d P. V.— 

disch. July 13, i^'>5. 
Killed at Fair Oaks, May 31, 

1862; buried Nat. Cemetery, 

Seven Pines, Va. 
Killed at Cold Harbor, June I, 

1S64. 
Not on muster-out roll. 
Mus. out with Co., Sept. 8, '64. 
Wounded at Fair ( >aks. May 

31, 1862 — mus. out with Co., 

Sept. 8, 1S64. 
Wounded at Gettysburg, July 

3, 1S63 — mus. out with Co., 

Sept. 8, 1864. 
Trans, to Co. E, 82d P. V.— 

disch. June 17, 1S65. 
Trans, to Co. F, 23d P. Y., 

Oct. 13, 1861. 
Died June 8, 1S64, of wounds 

received at Cold Harbor, 

June 1, 1864. 
Wounded at Cold Harbor, June 

I, 1S64 — mustered out with 

Co., Sept. S, 1S64. 
Mus. out with Co., Sept. S, '64. 
Disch. on Surg, cert., March 

24, 1862. 
Re-enlisted — trans, to S2d P.V. 

— disch. July 17, 1865 — Yet. 
Re-enlisted — trans, to Co. F, 

82d P. Y. — disch. July 17, 

1865— Yet. 
Wounded at Cold Harbor, June 

1, 1S64 — re-enlisted — trans, to 

Co. E, 82d P. Y.— disch. July 

17, 1865— Yet. 
Mus. out with Co., Sept. 8, '64. 
Mus. out with Co., Sept. 8, '64. 
Mus. out with Co., Sept. S, '64. 
Wounded at Fair Oaks, May 

31, 1S62 — mustered out with 

Co., Sept. 8, 1S64. 
Wounded at Fair Oaks, May 

31, 1862 — disch. on Surg. cert. 

Jan. 2, 1863. 
Disch. by writ of habeas corpus, 

Aug. 20. 1861. 
Trans, to Co. E, S2d P. V.— 

disch. July 13, 1S65. 
Trans, to Co. E, 82d P. V. — 

disch. July 13, 1865. 
Trans, to Co. H, 23d P. Y., 

Oct. 13, 1861. 
Killed in front of Petersburg, 

June, 1S64. 
Killed at Cold Harbor, June 1, 

1864. 
Deserted Sept. 21, 186:. 



218 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



Name 



Date 

of Muster 

into Service 



Higgins, John . 
Hogan, John 
Hasset, Edward 
Hennessey, Win. 
Jordan, James . 



Johnston, Adam B. 

Johnson, William. 
Keisle, John . . . 
Lindsey, Wm. H. 

Long, George . 
Milan, James . . . 

Moore, David . . 



Moore, George . . 
Moore, John . . . 

Milan, Bernard . . 
McYey, Hugh . . 
McConnell, Chas. 

McClelland, Rich. 
Mclntyre, Peter . 



McKenzie, John . 
McKinney, Joseph 
McKinney, Wm. . 
McNally, Thomas. 



McClung, John . . 
McManus, John . . 

McGinnis, James . 
McNeill, James . . 

McCafTerty, Janus 



Private . 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



14, '61 
14, '61 
14, '61 
14, '61 
14, '61 



Aug. 14, '61 



Aug. 


14. 


'61 


Aug. 


10, 


•63 


Aug. 


14. 


'61 


Aug. 


14, 


'61 


Aug. 


14, 


'61 



Aug. 27, '62 



Feb. 
Aug. 

Oct. 
Aug. 
Aug. 

Aug. 
Aug. 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 

Aug. 



Aug. 
Aug. 

Aug. 

Oct. 

Aug. 



1, '62 
14, '61 

13. '62 
14, '61 
14, '61 

14, '61 
14, '61 



14, '61 
14, '6i 
14, '61 



14, 


'61 


3 


14, 


'61 


3 


14. 


'61 


3 


28, 


'62 


3 


7. 


'62 


3 


14. 


'61 


3 



Deserted Feb. 2?, 1862. 
Deserted Sept. 21, 1861. 
Deserted Jan. 30, 1S62. 
Not on muster-out roll. 
Wounded at Cold Harbor, June 

1, 1S64 — mus. out with Co., 

Sept. 8, 1864. 
Wounded at Cold Harbor, June 

1, 1S64 — re-enlisted — trans, to 

Co. E, 82d P. V.— Pro. to 

Corp. — disch. July 17, 1865 — 

Vet. 
Killed at Cold Harbor, June 1, 

1864. 
Drafted — trans, to Co. E, 82d 

P. V.— disch. July 13, 1865. 
Wounded at Fair Oaks, May 

31, 1862 — mus. out with Co., 

Sept. 8, 1864. 
Killed at Cold Harbor, June 1, 

1864. 
Re-enlisted — trans, to Co. E, 

82d P. V.— disch. July 17, 

1865— Vet. 
Trans, to Co. E, 82d P. V — 

pro. to Corp. — disch. June 

17, 1865- 
Transferred to Co. E, S2d P. V. 
Killed at Cold Harbor, June 5, 

1864. 
Deserted June, 1863. 
Mus. out with Co., Sept. 8, '64. 
Trans, to Battery G, 2d U. S. 

Art., April 10, 1863. 
Mus. out with Co., Sept. S, '64. 
Wounded at Cold Harbor, June 

1, 1864 — mus. out with Co., 

Sept. 8, 1864. 
Mus. out with Co., Sept. 8, '64. 
Mus. out with Co., Sept. 8, '64. 
Disch. on Surg, cert., Apr.1,'62. 
Wounded at Fair Oaks, May 

31, 1862 — disch. on Surg. 

cert., Dec. 10, 1863. 
Re-enlisted — trans, to Co. E, 

82d P. V. — pro. to Corp. — 

disch. July 13, 1865 — Vet. 
Wounded May 28, 1863— re- 
enlisted — trans, to Co. E, 

82d P. V.— disch. July 13, 

1865— Vet. 
Trans, to Co. E. 82d P. V — 

disch. June 17, 1865. 
Wounded at Cold Harbor, June 

1, [864 — trans, to Co. E, 82d 

P. V. — disch. June, 1865. 
Trans, to Co. H, 23d P. V., 

Oct. 13, 1861. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



219 



\ \M1 




Date 

op Musti < 

INTO Sl'K\ II I 



Remarks 



McGinnis, John . . Private . Aug. 14, '61 ! 3 

McVey, John . . . 
McKnight, J. W. . 
McKeoun, Thomas 



O'Neill. Daniel . 
Pitts, Alexander 



Perry, John T. 
Quinn, John . 



Redmond, Wm. . 
Rankin, Alexander 
Rankin, James . . 

Robinson, John T. 



Sweeney, Archib'd 



Sweeney, James 
Simpkins, Belford 
Scrowl, James. 

Sproal, Robert 



Stewart, Charles 

Shindel, Peter W 
Smith, Archibald 
Scholas, James 
Shellady, John . 

Shea, William . 



Smith, Thomas 
Tate, John . . . 
Tate, Hugh . . 



Taylor, James. 



Aug. 14, '61 


3 


Aug. 14, '61 


3 


Aug. 14, '61 


3 


Oct. 7, '62 
Aug. 14, '61 


3 
3 


Aug. 4, '63 
Aug. 14, '61 


3 
3 


Aug. 14, '61 
Aug. 14, '61 
Aug. 27, '62 


3 
3 
3 


Aug. 1, '61 


3 


Aug. 14, '61 


3 


Aug. 14, '61 
Aug. 14, '61 
Aug. 14, '61 


3 
3 
3 


Aug. 14, '61 


3 


Aug. 14, '61 


3 


Sept. 29, '62 


3 


Oct. 13, '62 


3 


Aug. 14, '61 


3 


Jan. 10, '63 


3 


Aug. 14, '61 


3 


Aug. 14, '61 
Aug. 14, '61 
Jan. 28, '62 


3 
3 
3 


Feb. 1, '62 


3 



Re-enlisted — died of wounds 

received at Cold Harbor, 

June 1, 1864. 
Died June 8, 1S62, of wounds 

rec. at Fair Oaks, May 31/62. 
Wounded at Fair Oaks, May 

31, 1862— deserted July 9, '62. 
Re-enlisted trans, to Co. E, 

82d P. V. — disch. July 17, 

1 S65— Yet. 
Deserted F"eb. 27, 1863. 
Wounded and captured at Cold 

Harbor, June 1, 1864 — disch. 

Jan. 31, 1865. 
Drafted — deserted Aug. 30/63. 
Wd. at Malvern Hill, July 1, 1862 

and Gettys'g July 3/63 — mus. 

out with Co., Sept. 8, 1864. 
Mus. out with Co. Sept. 8, 1864. 
Mus. out with Co. Sept. 8, 1S64. 
Transferred to Co. E, S2d P. V. 

— discharged June 17, 1865. 
Re-enlisted — promoted to Corp. 

—trans, to Co. E, 82d P.V.— 

dis. July 17, 1S65. — Vet. 
Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 

1862 — mustered out with Co. 

Sept. S, 1S64. 
K'd at Cold Harbor June 1/64. 
Mus. out with Co. Sept. 8, 1864. 
Died Dec. 3, 1861 — buried in 

M. A. Cemetery, D. C. 
Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 

1862 — mustered out with Co. 

Sept. 8, 1S64. 
Wounded at Gettysburg July 3, 

1863 — mustered out with Co. 

Sept. 8, 1864. 
Transferred to V. R. C. — dis. 

on Surg. cer. Feb. 25, 1S65. 
Transferred to Co. E, 82d P.V. 

— discharged July 13, 1865. 
Died at Washington, D. C, 

Dec. 3, 1861. 
Died June 19, 1864, of wounds 

received at Cold Harbor, 

June 1, 1864. 
Wd. at Fair Oaks May 31, 1862 

and at Salem Church May 3, 

1863— killed at Cold Harbor 

June 1, 1864. 
Deserted Aug. 1, 1862. 
Dis. on Surg. cer. April 1, 1S62. 
Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 

1862 — transferred to Co. E, 

82d P. V.— dis. Jan. 28, 1865. 
Transferred to Co. E, S2d P. V. 
■discharged June 20, 1865. 



220 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 





Date 


T. 

< 

a 
- 




Name Rank 


of Muster 




Remarks 






into Service 


S 

X 

a 
h 




Tate, Henry . . . 


Private . 


Aug. 14, '61 


3 


Died June, 1S62, of wounds re- 
ceived at Fair Oaks May 31, 
1S62. 


Wilson, William J. 


" 


Aug. 14, '61 


i 


Dis. on Surg. cert. Sept., 1861. 


Warner, Samuel . 


Aug. 28, '62 


3 


Transferred to Co. E, 82d P.V. 
— discharged June 1 7, 1S65. 


Wallace, George . 


Oct. 13, '62 


3 


Wounded at Salem Church 
May 3, 186^— trans, to Co. E, 
S2d P. V.— dis. July 13, 1S65. 


Young, John . . . 


Aug. 20, '62 


■>, 


Wounded at Cold Harbor June 










1, 1N64 — trans, to Co. E, 82d 
P. V.— dis. June 17, 1865. 



COMPANY F 

RECRUITED AT PHILADELPHIA 



James Gwyn . . Capt . Aug. 



I >iim Birney 
HenryA. Marchant 

John B. Yancleve. 



A.J. Pemberton 
Win. Vodges. . . 



Jan., 
Aug. 

Aug. 



'61 



John B. Fassitt . . " Aug. 2, '61 



John B. Hunterson 1st. Lieut. Aug. 2, '61 



'62 

2, '61 

2, '61 



2d Lieut. 



Chas.W. Anderson isi Sgt. 



April 


'62 


3 


Aug. 


2, '61 


3 


Aug. 


2, '61 


3 



Resigned July 22, 1S62, to ac- 
cept Lt. Colonelcy usth P.V. 
— disch. as Col. and 15v. Brig. 
Gen. and Bv. Maj. Gen., June 
1, 1865— wounded in battle 
of Wilderness, May 5, 1864. 

Enlisted as private, 1st Troop 
Philadelphia City Caw, May 
13, 1861 — trans, to 23d Pa. 
Vol. — disch. July 31, 1861 — 
pro. from 2d Lt. Co. H to 1st 
Lt. and Adj. on detached 
service as Act's Asst. Adj. 
Gen. of Gen. D. B. Birney's 
Staff — re-joined Regt., as- 
signed to Co. C as 1 st Lt. — 
pro. to Capt. Co. F, July [8, 
1862, for gallant and merito- 
rious service at Malvern Hill 
— detached on Gen. Birney's 
Staff .is A. Ii. C— discharged 
Sept., 1864 — awarded medal 
of honor for gallantry at Get- 
tysburg, July 2, 1S63. 

Resigned Jan. 13, 1862 — com. 
Capt. 118th P. Y.— disch. Feb, 
1. 1. 1865. 

Resigned April, 1862. 

I'lunioted to Capt. Co. 1, Jan. 
1, isii; 

Promoted from 1st Sgt. Co. K, 
to 2d Lt. Co. I, Jan. 24, 1862 
— to 1st Lt. Co. I\ Jan. 1, 
[863 — raus. out with Co., 
Sept. 8, 1864. 

Resigned |ulv s. t86a — wd at 
Malvern Hill. July 1, 1S62. 

Promoted t<> 2d I 1., I tec. 15, 
[862 — mus. out with Co., 

Sept. S, i«64. 
Died while in service, Feb. 7, 
[862, 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



221 



Name 



Dati 

Ol Mi S ) I B 

into Service 



Frederick Huher . 
Alexander Powell. 



1 )avid Colville . . 


Sergeant. 


An-. 


2, '6l 


W'm. Creen . . . 




Aug-. 


2, '6l 


James Masland . . 




An-. 


2. '6l 



Casper Miller . 



Henrv Robson . 



Chas. M. Young 



Benj. F. Atkinson. Corp. 

Henrv Bernholdt . " 

Henry H. Cozier . " 

Francis L. Ellis . . " 

W'm. McGarvev . " 

James H. Graham. " 

Alex. Johnson . . " 



tstSgt. Aug. j . ' 6 1 3 Killed at Fair Qaks, May 3i,'62. 

Aug. 2, '6i 3 Prisoner oi war from June i, 

1864, to March 1, 1865 — mus. 

out April 12. 1865— wounded 

while Sgt., at Fair ( )aks, May 
31. 1862, and while 1st Sgt., 
at Cold Harbor, June 1. 1N64 
— said action reported killed. 
Promoted to Sgt., May 18, 1S63 
—mus. out with Co., SeDt. 
8, 1864. 
Promoted to Sgt.. Jan. 1, 1S63 
— wounded at Fair Oaks, May 
31, 1862 — mus. out with Co., 
Sept. 8, 1S64. 
Promoted to Corp., Dec. 1, '63, 
t<> Sgt., March 26, 1864 — mus. 
out with Co., Sept. 8, 1S64 — 
wounded at Cold Harbor, 
June 1, 1864. 
Aug. 2, '61 3 Promoted to 2d Lieut. Co. E, 
Aug. 27, 1S64— trans, to Co. 
E, 82d P. \\. Sept., 1864— 
mus. out with Co., as 1st Lt., 
July 13,1865 — Yet. — wounded 
at Cold Harbor, June 1, 1S64. 
Aug. 2, '61 3 Promoted to Sgt., Feb. 3, 1862 
— mus. out with Co. . Sept. 8, 
1S64 — wounded at Cold 1 1 ar- 
bor, June 1, 1S64. 
Aug. 2, '61 3 Promoted to Sgt., Dec. 1, 1861 
— disch. Jan., 1863, to accept 
com. as 2d Lt, 11 Nth P. V. — 
pro. to Capt. — wounded at 
P'air Oaks, May 31, 1862 — 
killed at Peeble's Farm, Sept. 
30, 1S64. 
Aug. 2, '61 3 Promoted to Corp., May 18, 
1S63 — mustered out with Co., 
Sept. 8, 1864. 
Sept. 1, '61 1 3 Promoted to Corp., 1862 — mus. 

out with Co., Sept. 8, 1S64. 
Sept. 15, '62 3 Trans, to Co. E, S2d P. V., 
Sept., 1864 — disch. June 17, 
1S65 — wounded at Marye's 
Heights, May 3, 1S63. 
Sept. 15, '62 3 Trans, to Co. E, 82d P. V., 
Sept., 1864 — disch. June 17, 
1S65 — wd. at Salem Church, 
May, 1S63. 
Aug. 2, '61 3 Promoted to Corp. Oct. 15, '63 
— mus. out with Co., Sept. 8, 
1864. 
Sept. 15, '62 3 Promoted to Corp. — trans, to 
Co. E, S2d P. V., Sept., 1864, 
disch. June 17, 1S65 — wd. at 
Gettysburg, July 3, 1S63. 
Aug. 6, '62 3 Trans, to Co. E, 82d P. V., 
Sept., 1864 — disch. June 17, 
1865. 



222 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 




Date 

of Muster 

into Service 



Remarks 



John D. Kelly 



George Graham. 
Andrew White 
Atkinson, Joseph 



Boyle, John . . 



Benson, Geo. A. . 



Bodkin, Robert 
Brewer, Joseph . 



Brady, Thomas 



Bothwell, James . 

Brestler, Wm. S. . 
Beckman, Adolph. 

Connelly, John, Sr. 
Connelly, John, Jr. 



Cole, Stanley F. 
Carrigan, John . 



Campbell, David 
Craig, William . 

Donnelly, D., Sr. 
Donnelly, D., Jr. 



Dunn, Edward 



Doyle, John 



Dougherty, James 
Duncan, William . 



Evans, Lewis . . . 



Corporal . 

Musician. 
Private . 



Aug. 2, '61 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



2, '6l 
2, '6l 
2. '6l 



Aug. 2, '6i 



Aug. 2, '6i 



Aug. 
Aug. 



2, '6l 
2, '6l 



Aug. 2, '6i 



Aug. 2, '6i 



Sept. 
Dec. 

Aug. 

Aug. 



Aug. 
Aug. 



15. '62 
i, '6i 

2, '6l 
2, '6l 



2, '6l 
2, '6l 



Aug. 
Sept. 

Aug. 

Aug. 



2, '6l 

27. '6i 

14, '61 
2, '61 



Aug. 2, '61 



Aug. 2, '61 



Nov. 
Aug. 



2r,'6i 
1, '6i 



Aug. 2, '61 



Promoted to Corp., March 26, 
1S64 — mus. out with Co., 
Sept. 8, 1S64. 

Mus. out with Co., Sept. 8, '64. 

Deserted May .11, 1S62. 

Mus out with Co., Sept. S, '64 
— wounded at Fair Oaks, May 
31, 1862, and at Cold Harbor, 
June 1, 1S64. 

Mus. out with Co., Sept. 8, '64 
— wd. at Fair Oaks, May 31, 
1862, and at Cold Harbor, 
June 1, 1864. 

Mus. out with Co., Sept, 8, '64 
—wounded at Cold Harbor, 
June 1, 1.864. 

Mus. out with Co. Sept. S, 1S64. 

Mus. out with Co. Sept. 8, 1864 
— wounded at White Oak 
Swamp June, 1S62. 

Mus. out with Co. Sept. 8, 1864 
— wounded at Fair Oaks May 
31, 1862. 

Wound' d at Salem Church May, 
1863 — discharged 1864. 

K'd at Cold Harbor June i,'64. 

Wd. at Fair Oaks May 31, 1862 
— absent at muster out. 

Absent in hospital at mus. -out. 

Mustered out with Co. Sept. 8, 
1864 — wounded at Marye's 
Heights, May 3, 1863. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate of disabil'y March 7, '62. 

Transferred to Co. E, S2d P.V. 
Sept. 1864 — must'd out with 
Company July 13, 1865 — Vet. 
— captured by Mosby July, '64. 

Deserted Nov. 12, 1861. 

Absent at muster out — enlisted 
U. S. Navy — discharged 1S65. 

Mus. out with Co. Sept. 8, 1S64. 

Ab. at mus. out — enlisted!.'. S. 
Marine Corps— wd. at Fair 
Oaks May 31, 1862. 

Transferred to Co. E, 82d P.V., 
Sept., 1864 — mustered out 
with Co. July 13. 1S65 — Yet. — 
wd. at Gettysburg July 3, '63 
— transferred from Co. M. 

Mustered out with Co. Sept 8, 
1864 — wounded at Marye's 
Heights May 3, 1863. 

Deserted Dec. 12, 1861. 

I'ransferred to S2d P. V. Sept., 
1 86 4 wounded at Cold Har- 
bor June 1, 1S64 — Vet. 

Mustered out Dec. 1, 1S64. 



PENNSYLVANIA V< iLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



223 




Date 

of Muster 

into Service 



Earle, James . . . 

Emmons, Reading 

Edwards, Wm. . . 

Fisher, Julius . . . 

Fullerton, Wm. . . 
Flanigan, Wm. . . 

Fee, Samuel . . • 

Gowan, Edward . 

Graham, Geo. W. 

Graham, Daniel. . 
Glaze, John . . . 
( iarvin, Austin 
Gorman, Thos. B. 
Harris, Charles . . 
Hickey, Patrick . 

Hemphill, Wm. . 

Henry, James . . 

Haslem, Charles . 
Hamilton, James . 

Henry, Peter . . . 



Hunterbock, C. . 
Harp, Jacob . . . 



Keesey, Wm. H. . 
Keesey. James W. 
Kilpatrick, Wm. . 



Private 



Aug. 2, '6l 



Aug. 2, '61 



Aug. 
Aug. 

Aug. 

Sept. 



2, '6i 

2, '6l 
2, '6l 

16, '62 



Aug. 2, '6i 



Aug 



2, '6i 



Aug. 2, '6i 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Dec. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



Aug. 
Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 



2, '6i 

2, '6l 

3,'6i 

l,'6i 
2, '6i 
2, '6i 



2, '6l 
2, '6l 
2, '6l 

io, '63 



Jan. 16, '64 



Sept. 
Aug. 


'61 
2, '61 


3 
3 


Aug. 


2, '61 


3 


July 


16, '63 


3 


Aug. 


2, '61 


3 



Trans. toCo.E, 82d P.V., Sept., 
'64, and trans, to Yet. Res. 
Corps— dis. July 13, '65 — wd. 
at Fair Oaks, May 31, 1S62. 

Transferred to Co. E, S2d P.V., 
Sept., 1S64 — mustered out 
with Co. July 13, 1865. — Yet. 

Deserted Nov. 12, 1861. 

Mus. out with Co. Sept. 8, 1864 
— transferred from Co. M. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate Nov. 8, 1862. 

Transferred to Co. E, 82d P.V. 
Sept, 1864 — discharged June 
17, 1S65 — wounded at Marye's 
Heights May 3, 1863. 

Died in service Oct. 16, 1862 — 
buried in Mount Olivet Cem- 
etery, Frederick, d.M. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate June 19, 1862. 

Transferred to 2d P.V. Cavalry, 
Nov. 2, 1S62. 

I >ied in service Jan. 25, 1S64. 

Deserted Dec. 12, 1S61. 

Deserted Oct. 5, 1862. 

Deserted March 16, 1S62. 

Mus. out with Co., Sept. S, '64. 

Mus. out with Co., Sept. S, '64 
— wounded at Fredericksburg 
Dec. 13, 1S62. 

Mus. out with Co., Sept. S, '64 
— wounded at Fair Oaks, 
May 3r, 1862. 

Mus. out with Co., Sept. 8, '64 
— wounded at Malvern Hill, 
July 1, 1862. 

Mus. out by Special Order to 
enlist as Hos. Stew., U.S.A. 

Trans, to Co. E, 8 2 d P. V.— 
died Aug. 31, 1864, of wds. 
received at Cold Harbor, June 
1, 1864. 

Trans, to Co. E, 82d P. V., 
Sept., 1S64 — mus. out with 
Co., as Corp , July 13, 1865 — 
wd. at Cold Harbor, June 3, 
1S64. 

Deserted March 16, 1862. 

Re-enlisted as Y'et. Vol. — trans. 
to Co. K — killed at Cold Har- 
bor, June 1, 1864. 

Mus. out with Co., Sept. 8, '64 
— wounded at Charles City X 
Roads, June, 1862. 

Drafted— trans, to Co. E, 82d 
P.V., Sept., 1864 — discharged 
July 7, 1865. 

Died of wounds received in ac- 
tion at Fair Oaks, May 31, '62 



224 



HISTORY OF THK TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



Name 



K \\K 



Date 

of Muster 

into Service 



Remarks 



Kennedy, Michael. Private 
Kennedy, Peter . 
Lukens, Chas. P. . 



Loane, Abraham 
Lewison, David 

Long, Andrew . 



Love, James . . . 

Love, Robert . . . 
Lukens, Thos. S. 



Lewis, Jacob 
Long, John 
Lynn, Henry 

Moffit, John 



Moore, Joseph 



Moreley, Thomas 
Mathews, James 
Maxwell. Win. . 
McCabe, Peter . 
Mi i ..trvey, James. 
McElroy, Wm. 
McCluskey, C. B. 



McHugh, Patrick 



McFadden, James. 



Mc< ■ irkle, Thos. 
McKissick, John 

I .' ■ i. W. 



Oct. 

Sept. 

Auer. 



Aug. 
Sept. 



S, '61 3 
i, '61 3 
2, "6i 3 



2, '6i 3 
15. '62 3 



Aug. 2, '6i 3 



Sept. 15, '62 3 



Aug. 
Aug. 



Sept. 
Aug. 

Sept. 



2, '61 

2, '6i 



23, '61 3 

2, '61 3 

15. '62 



Aug. 2, '61 



Jan. 1, '64 3 







Aug. 


2, '61 


3 




1 


Aug. 


2, '6i 


3 


. 


' 


Aug. 


2, '61 


3 






Aug. 


j, '6i 


3 




' 


Aug. 


2. '61 


3 




' 


All'.;. 


2, '61 


3 




' 


Aua\ 


2, '6l 


3 



Jan. 25, '64 3 



Aug. 2. '61 3 



Vug. 

Sept. 



\llL 



6] 1 
'62 3 



2, '6i 3 



Killed at Fair Oaks, May 31, '62. 
1 leserted Jan. 16, 1863. 
Absent in hospital at muster- 
out — wounded on picket at 
Warwick Creek, April, 1S62. 
Disc, on Surg, cer., Sept. I2,'h2. 
Disch. on Surg. cert, of dis., 

Jan. 1, 1863. 
Trans, to Co. E, 82d P. V., 
Sept., 1864— mus. out with 
Co., July 13, 1865 — Yet. — 
wd. at Malvern Hill, July 1/A2. 
Transferred to Co. E, 82d P.V., 
Sept., 1864 — disch. June 17, 
1S65 — wounded at Cold Har- 
bor, June 1, 1864. 
Disch. on Surg. cert, of dis., 

March 7. 1862. 
Trans, to Co. E, 82d P. V., 
Sept., 1864 — mus. out with 
Co., July 13, 1865 — Vet.— wd. 
at Petersburg, July, 1864. 
Died in service, Feb. 23, [863. 
Deserted Nov. 12, 1861. 
Deserted July 11, 1863 — wd. at 
Marye's Heights, May 3, 1863. 
\\ 1 lunded at Fair Oaks, May 31, 
1862 — missing at Marye's 
Heights, May 3, [863 — mus. 
out with Co., Sept. S, 1864 — 
transferred from Co. M. 
Transferred to Co. E, 82d P.V., 
Sept., 1864 — must, out with 
Co. July 13, 1865 — wounded at 
Cold Harbor June 1, '64. 
Deserted Feb. 25, 1862. 
Deserted March 1, 1862. 
1 leserted March 1 6, [862 
Must, out with Co. Sepi 8, '6 1 
Must, out with Co. Sept. 8, '<•). 
Must, out « ith Co. Sept. 8, '64 
Dis. onSurgeon's certificate of 
disability May 3/63 -wounded 
at Fair < )aks May 31, 1862. 
Trans, to Co. F. 821! P.V. Sepl . 
1864 — mus. out with Co. July 
13, 1865 -wounded at ( old 
I [arbor June 1, [864. 
Re-enlisted, trans, to Co. E, 82d 
P.Y. Sept., '64, wd. Cold Har- 
bor, June, '64, killed at Sail- 
or'sCreek April 6,'65 -Vet, 
Killed at Fair < >aks May 31/62. 
Captured at Mine Run Nov., 
18A3 — died at Audcrsonville 
April i\ 1864 grave 605, 

Descried Mar. I, 1862. 



PENNSYLVANIA V( (LUNTEER INFANTRY 



2?5 




Date 

s I 



Parker. Jas. . Private 

Prentiss, John . . 

Purnell, John . . . 

Rodgers, A. J. 

Russell. Wm. . . 



Rodgers, William. 
Roney, Thomas . 
Rosenthal, Aug. . 

Robinson. Lucius. 



Robinson, John T. 

Stafford. George . 

Stetzell, Albert . . 

Singer. Augustus . 

Shaw. Zachariah J. 
Snell, Owen . . . 
Stanley, John . . 
Stanley, Geo. \Y. 
Tarbott, James . . 
Taylor. William 
Thomas, E. . . . 



Valentine, Henry. 
Wray. William J. 



West. Wm. A. . . 
Williams, Chas. A. 
Whitman. Jacob M. 



Aug. 2. 
Aug. 2, 
Aug. 2, 



6i 3 
6i 3 
6i 3 



Aug. 


2. 


'6l 


3 


Aug. 


2 


'6l 


3 


Sept. 
Aug. 


2, 
2 


'6l 
'6l 


3 
3 


Jan. 


I, 


62 


3 


Aug. 


2, 


"61 


3 


Aug. 


2, 


'6l 


3 


Aug. 


2, 


'6l 


3 


Nov. 


I, 


'6l 


3 


Dec. 


I, 


'6l 


3 


Aug. 
Aug. 
Sept. 

Sept. 
An-. 
Sept. 


2. 
2. 

2, 


'6l 
•6l 
'6l 
'6l 
'6l 
'6l 


3 

3 
3 
3 
3 

3 


Sept. 
Aug. 


15- 
2, 


'62 
'6l 


3 

3 



Aug. 


2. 


•61 


3 


Sept. 


15- 


•62 


3 


Aug. 


2, 


•61 


3 



Mus. out with Co. Sept 
— re-enlisted U. S. S. Sabine. 
Feb., 1865, disch. Feb.. [867. 

Trans. From Co. M. 23d 1'. V. 
Jan., 1S62 — dis. pnSurg. certi- 
ficate of disability Aug. 1. '62. 

Transferred from Co. M. 23d P. 
V., Jan.. 1S62 — wounded at 
Fair Oaks May 31, 1N62 — dis. 
on Surgeon's certificate of 
disability Oct. 12. 1862. 

Mustered out with Co. Sept. 8, 
1864 — wounded at Cold Har- 
bor June 1, 1864. 

Transferred from Co. M, 23d P. 
Y. Jan., 1S62 — mustered out 
with Co. Sept. S, 1864 

Mus. out with Co. Sept. S. 1864. 

Killed at Fair Oaks May 31, '62. 

Deserted Sept. 18. 1S62 — woun. 
at Fair Oaks May 3 r. 1862. 

Mustered out with Co. Sept. 8, 
1S64 — wounded at Cold Har- 
bor. June i, 1S64. 

Trans, to Co. E, 23d P V. — 
trans, to 82d 1'. V. Sept., '64 
— mustered out — wounded at 
Fair Oaks May 31, 1.862 — Yet. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate of disability April 28/62. 

Transferred to sSth P. Y., April 
1. 1862. 

Transferred to 58th P. Y. April 
1. 1862. 

K'd at Cold Harbor June 1. '64. 

Deserted Oct. 10, 1862 — wound. 

Deserted March 16, 1862. 

Deserted March 16, 1S62. 

Absent at muster out. 

Deserted March 16, 1862. 

Wounded and captured at Cold 
Harbor June. 1S64 — died at 
Andersonville Aug. 30. 1S64, 
of wounds — grave 7250. 

Deserted May 10, 1863. 

Trans, to Co. K, 1st Yet. Res. 
Corps, Feb. 14. 1S64 — dis. as 
Sergeant Nov. 23, 1865 — w'd 
at Kredericksburg Dec. 13. '62 
— awarded medal of honor at 
Ft. Stevens, D. C, Julv 12. 
1S64— Yet. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate of disability Aug 1. '62. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate of disability Jan. 1. '63. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate of dis. Jan. 1. 1863— 
wounded at Fair Oaks May 
31, ' 



226 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



N \mi 



Date 

of Musi IK 

into Service 



Weaver, Win. A. . Private 



Young, Elias 



Aug. 2, '61 ■ 3 Discharged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate of disability Aug. 12, 
1862 — wounded at Fair Oaks 
May 31, 1862. 

Aug. 2, '61 3 Died in service Dec. 1, 1861 



COMPANY G 

RECRUITED AT PHILADELPHIA 



John Maxwell . . . 
James M. Linnard. 



Jesse Simcox . 
T. J. Armstrong 

Frank Taylor . 



Captain 



1st Lieut. 



James House . . . 

Rich'd A. Griffith. 

John G. Boyd . 
L. H. McClaskey. 

James Culberston. 

Win. C. Barclay . 

I 1 ,, hi. in I 1. Karnes. 
John Reen . . . . 



I lavid Applegate 



Aug. 
Aug. 



Aug. 
Sept. 



'61 
'61 



'61 



•6. 3 



Aug. 13, '61 



Aug. 24, '61 



2d Lieut. 

1st Sergt. 

Sergeant. 



Aug. 

Aug. 
Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 
Aug. 






24- 

24, 

-•4. 

24, 

24. 
13. 



'61 



'61 



Corp . . Sept. 1, 



'6i 


3 


'61 


3 


•61 


3 


•61 


3 


•in 


3 



Disch. on Surg, cert., Jan. 1/63. 

Promoted to Capt. Jan. 1, '63 — 
detached to Gen. Detreau- 
briand's Staff, Aug. 15, 1864. 

Promoted to Capt. Co. B, 23d 
P.Y., Aug. 31, 1S62. 

Promoted to 1st Lieut. Co. M, 
Sept. 2, 1S61 ; to Co. G.Aug. 
31, 1862 — detached to Gen. 
Shaler's Staff— died Jan. 2, 
1864. 

Promoted from 1st Sgt. Co 1, 
to 2d Lieut. Co. G. July 22, 
1862 ; to 1st Lieut., March 3, 
1864; to Capt. Co. I, Sept. 
9, 1864 — wounded five times 
at Cold Harbor, June 1, 1S64, 
and wd. at Sailor's Creek, 
April 6, 1865— Yet. 

Promoted from 1st Sgt. to 1st 
Lieut., Aug. 11, 1864 — re-en- 
listed — trans, to 82d P. Y. — 
disch July 17, 1865 — Yet. 

Wounded at Cold Harbor, June 
1, 1864 — promoted to 1st l.t. 
Co. D, 23d P. Y. 
Promoted to 2d Lieut. Co. 1 ), 

23d 1'. Y.. Sept. 1 1, [862. 
Wounded ai Malvern 1 [ill, fulj 
1 , 1 862 — disch. on Surg, cert., 
March 21 . (863. 
Wounded .it Cold I [arbor, June 
1 . [864 urns, out with Co., 
Sept. 8, 1S64. 
Promoted from Corp. March 1, 
1863 mustered out with ( <>.. 
Sept. 8, (864. 
Killed at Cold Harbor, June 1. 

I Mi I 

Wounded five times at I .iii 
( (aks, May 31. [862, and wd. 
.11 Marye's I Itiyhls, May 3. 
[863 re enlisted Ir.ins. tn 
Co.' E, 82d P. V. disch. fulj 
13, [865 \ et. 

Killed at ( '1 1I1I 1 [arbor, lime 1 , 

[864. 



PENNSYLVANIA YOU'NTEER INFANTRY. 



2L'7 



N mi 



K \Nk 



Dati 

Ol Ml 5T1 K 

in 1 1 1 Service 



Thos. H. Boyd 
Sam'l C. Duswald. 
Frederick Fisher . 
John Gibson . . . 



John Hays . . . . 
Geo. W. Johnson . 



G. M. Mackinson . 



John Mills . . 



Win. Muschert . 
Win. R. Roe . . 



John Stevenson . . 
Henry S. Winner. 
Allibone, Thomas. 



Anthony, Harry D. 

Artman, Samuel . 
Boyd, Andrew . . 



Bockins, Win. . 
Brown, James S. 

Bantom, Wm. H. 



Black, Robert 



Brinker, Alfred . 



Bantom, Henry W. 
Black, James . . . 
Boddy, Geo. W. . 



Corporal. Aug. 
Sept 



24, 



'61 

'61 

Aug. 27, '61 
Sept. 1, '61 



Aug. 
Sept. 

Aug, 

Aug. 



Sept. 
Aug. 



24 



24, 



Sept 
Musician. Aug. 
Private . Sept. 



6, 
24, 



Sept. 1, 



Aug. 
Aug. 



Aug. 
Sept. 



24, 
1, 



Aug. 30, 



Sept. iS, 



Sept. 3, 



•61 
'61 



'61 
•61 



'61 
'61 



'61 
'6i 
'61 



Aug. 

Au K . 
Oct. 



31. 



'6l 


3 


'61 
'61 


3 
3 


'61 
'61 


3 
3 


62 


3 


62 


3 


61 


3 


62 
61 
61 


3 
3 

3 



Wounded at Marye's Heights, 

May 3, 1863 — mustered out 

with Co., Sept. 8, 1864. 
Wounded at Marye's Heights, 

May 3, 1863— mustered" out 

with Co., Sept. 8. 1S64. 
Promoted to Corp., June 1/63 

— mus. out with Co.. Sept. 

8, 1864. 
Wounded at Fair Oaks, May 

31, 1S62 — disch. on Surg. 

certificate, July 8, 1862. 
Died Feb., 1862. 
Promoted to Corp., Dec. 12, 

1S62 — mustered out with Co., 

Sept. 8, 1864. 
Wounded at Marye's Heights, 

May 3, 1863 — disch. on Surg. 

cert. May 1, 1864. 
Wounded at Fair Oaks, May 

31, 1862— re-enlisted — trans. 

to Co. E, 82d P. Y. -disch. 

July 13, 1S65— Yet. 
Killed at Fair Oaks, May 31/62. 
Re-enlisted — trans, to Co. E, 

82d P. V.— pro. to Sgt. Co. 

K — wounded at Gettysburg, 

July 3, 1863— disch. July 17, 

1865— Vet. 
Deserted July 7, 1S63. 
Deserted July 10, 1S63. 
Wounded at Fair Oaks, May 

31, 1S62 — mustered out with 

Co., Sept. 8. 1S64. 
Transferred to Co. R, 23d P. 

V., Oct. 31, 1S61. 
Killed at Fair Oaks, May 31/62. 
Wounded at Malvern Hill, July 

1, 1S62 — mustered out with 

Co., Sept. S, 1S64. 
Mus. out with Co., Sept. 8, '64. 
Trans, to Co. E, 23d P.V., Jan. 

1, 1S63. 
Wounded at Sailor's Creek, 

Apr. 6, 1865 — trans, to Co. 

E, 82d P. V. — disch. June 

16, 1S65. 
Wounded at Marye's Heights, 

May 3, 1863 — trans to Co. 

E, S2d P. V.— disch. June 

16, 1S65. 
Wounded at Marye's Heights, 

May 3, 1S63 — re-enlisted — 

trans, to Co. E, 82d P. V — 

dis. July 13, 1865. — Vet. — 

promoted to Sergt. Co. K. 
Died Johnson's Isl'd Jan. 27/64. 
Died June 26, :S62. 
Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 

1862— absent at muster-out. 



228 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 




Date 

of Muster 

into Service 



Remarks 



Connelly, Martin . 



Connelly, Edmund 
Culbertson, Ed. A. 

Chadwick.Wm. B. 



Cuskaden, James . 

Clair, Win. II . . . 
Cavender, Philip . 
Cassady, Joseph . 
Crawford, George. 
Donahue, Charles. 



Davis, John. . . . 
Dankle, Alfred J. . 
I )onahue, Thomas 
Davenport, James. 
Dunn, Francis A. 



Ernst, Henry . 
Ewell, George W. 
Edward, John R. . 

Flenard, Wm. H. 
Fraley. George W. 
Falby, George W. 
Fisher, Henry. . . 

Fitzpatrick, John . 
Grant, Edward J. . 
Graham, William. 



Harey, L. M. 



Haddock, Henry 
IMlsee, Robt. C. 
I [uber, Peter . . 



I lavey. Patrick 



Hazlett, Matthew. 

Howard, Wm. II. 
I tighly, William . 
Kroessen, [ami ' 



Private 



Aug. 24, '61 



Sept. 6, 
Feb. 1, 

Aug. 30, 



Aug. 24, 
Sept. 1, 
Aug. 24, 
Aug. 22, 
. Aug. 24, 



•61 
'61 
'61 
'61 
•61 



Sept. 1, 
Sept. 1, 
Aug 24, 
Sept. 1, 
Oct. 31, 



Aug. 27, 
Aug. 24, 
Aug. 30, 

Aug. 24, 
1, 
1, 



Sept. 
Sept. 
Aug. 2.S, 

Aug. 24, 
Aug. 24, 
Sept. 1, 



Aug. 24, 
Aug. 24, 
Sept. 2(1, 



Aug. 28, '61 



Sept. I, 

Sept. 1, 

Sept. 1, 

Sept, 1. 



61 3 

62 3 

62 I 3 



Sept. 1, '61 1 3 



'61 3 

•61 3 

'61 I 3 



•61 3 

'61 3 

'61 3 

•62 3 

•61 3 

6, 3 

61 3 



Aug. 24, '61 3 



61 3 

62 J 



'61 


3 


'61 


\ 


'61 


^ 


'6i 


.; 



Wounded at Marye's Heights 
May 3, 1863 — mustered out 
with Co. Sept. 8, 1864. 

Dis. on Serg. cert. Oct. 15, '61. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
1862 — discharged July, 1S62. 

Wounded at Cold Harbor June 
1, 1864 — trans, to Co. E, 82d 
P. Y. — dis. June 24, 1865. 

Died Aug. 15, 1862, of wounds 
rec. at Malvern Hill July [,'62. 

Killed at Fair Oaks May 31, '62. 

Discharged Nov. 9, 186 1. 

Deserted May 3, 1863. 

Transferred to Co. D, 23d P.Y. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
1S62, and at Marye's Heights 
May 3, 1S63 — mustered out 
with Co. Sept. 8, 1864. 

Disch. onSurg'scer. Jan. 11, '62. 

Deserted June 8, 1862. 

Deserted Sept. 27, 1S62. 

Died Aug. 1, 1X62. 

Wounded at Fair ( laks May 31, 
1862 — discharged on Sing's 
certificate Sept. 22, 1862. 

K'd at Cold Harbor June 1, '64. 

K'd at Cold Harbor June 1 ,'64. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
1S62 — deserted in [862. 

Mus. out with Co. Sept. X, '<>4- 

Mus. out witli Co. Sept. 8, '64. 

Mus. out with Co. Sept. 8, '64. 

Transferred to Co. E, 82d P. V. 
— discharged July 13, 1865. 

Deserted April 10, 1S62. 

Transferred to Co. R, 23d P.V. 

Mustered out with Co. Sept. 8, 
1S64— died of wounds rec'd 
at Cold Harbor. 

Wounded at Marye's Heights 
May 3, 1863 — mustered out 
with Co. Sept 8, (864. 

Mus. out with Co. Sept. 8, '64. 

Mus. out vi ith Co, Sept. 8, '64. 

Transferred to Co. E, 82d P. V. 
— discharged on Surgeon's 
certificate April 17, [865. 

Wounded at Marye's Heights 
May ;. [863 re enlisted 
transferred to 82d P. V.— 

died ol WOUnds rec. at Win- 

1 hester Sept. 19, '64. Vet. 
Died of wounds received it 
Fair ( laks May 31, [862. 

Descried Dec. 1. [862. 

1 leserted Jul) i , [862 

\\ ounded at Fair! laks Max \j, 
[862, and at Marye's 1 [eights 
May 3, i s, >; absent in hos- 
pital ai muster-out. 



PKXXSYI.YAX1A Vol. I N I l-:i -K 1XFAXTRY. 



229 



\ 1M1 




Date 

OB Mrs I I R 

into Service 



f 

a 



Kerr, George . . . 

Kerr, George W. . 
Lithgen, William . 
Lindsay, Adrian G. 



Mackelheny, Jacob. 

Milligan. George . 



Maholland, W'm. 



Miller, Richard J. 



Manderheld, John. 
Morely, John F. . 
McKneass, Thos. . 



Mcliride, Peter . . 
McCarty, George . 
McAfee, John W. . 



McGinnis, James . 
McNickel, Alfred . 
McBride, Wm. J. . 
McKinney, Robt. J. 
Xorris, Charles H. 
Nacey, James . . . 



Xagel, Louis H. 
Nelson, Geo. W. 
Xathans, John. . 
Peile, Frank C. . 
Painter, John . . 



Patterson, Robert. 
Poole, Jefferson . 
Robinson, James . 
Robb, Robert. . . 



Private 



Sept. i, '6 1 

Sept. I, '61 

Sept. i, '61 

Sept. 6, '6i 



Sept. i, '6i 
Aug. 22, '6i 



Aug. 24, '61 
Sept. 1, '61 



Sept. 1 , '61 
Aug. 25, '61 
Aug. 24, '61 



Aug. 24, '61 
Sept. 1, '61 
Sept. 1, '61 



Aug. 28, 'hi 
Sept. 1, '61 
Sept. 1, '61 
Oct. 31, '61 
Aug. 24, '6r 
Sept. 1, '61 



Sept. 1, '61 
Aug. 24, '61 
Aug. 24, '61 
Sept 1, '61 
Sept. 1, '61 



Sept. 1, '61 

Aug. 24, '61 

Sept. 1. '61 

Sept. 1, '61 



\\ minded at Fair Oaks May3i, 
1862 — discharged on Sur- 
geon's certificate April 7, '63. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
1862 — deserted June 1, 1862. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate Nov. 24, 1861. 

Wounded at Cold Harbor June 
I, 1864 — re-enlisted — trans, to 
Co. E, 8 2 d P. V.— discharged 
July 13, 1865— Vet. 

Mus. out with Co. Sept. 8. '64. 

Wd. and captured June 30, '62 at 
Charles City X Roads — must, 
out with Co. Sept. 8, 1864. 

Wounded at Cold Harbor June 
1, 1S64 — re-enlisted — trans- 
ferred to Co. E, 82d P. V. — 
discharged July 13, '65. — Yet. 

Wounded at Sailor's Creek 
April 6, 1865 — re-enlisted — 
transferred to Co. E,82d P.V. 
— discharged as Sergeant July 
13, 1865.— Yet. 

Deserted July 1, 1862. 

Deserted Jan. 10, 1862. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
1862 — mustered out with Co. 
Sept. 8, 1864. 

Wounded at Malvern Hill July 
1, 1862 — mustered out with 
Co. Sept. S, 1864. 

Wounded at Marye's Heights 
May 3, 1863 -mustered out 
with Co. Sept. S, 1864. 

Wounded at Malvern Hill July. 
1, 1862 — re-enlisted — trans- 
ferred to Co. E, 82d P. V.— 
dis. July 13, 1865. — Yet. 

Died Aug. 25, 1864. 

Deserted Nov. 15, 1861. 

Deserted Sept. iS, 1862. 

Deserted Sept. 29, 1862. 

Mus. out with Co. Sept. 8, '64. 

Wounded at Marye's Heights 
May 3, 1863, and Cold Har- 
bor, June 1, 1S64 — discharged 
Sept. 1864. 

Mus. out with Co. Sept. S, 1864. 

Dis. on Surg. cert. Dec. 3, '61. 

Dis. on Surg. cert. March 12, '62. 

Mus. out with Co. Sept. S, '64. 

Wounded at Gettysburg July 3, 
1863 — mustered out with Co. 
Sept. S, 1S64. 

Mus. out with Co. Sept. 8, 1864. 

Dis. on Surg. cert. April 19, '62. 

Mus. out with Co. Sept. 8, '64. 

Mus. out with Co. Sept. 8, '64. 



230 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 




Date 

of Muster 

into Service 



Rutherford, W. G. 



Roe, Jesse B. 



Reynolds, Edw. A 
Roward, Henry . 
Rea, Francis D. 
Rush, Win. E. . 
Robinson, L. J. 
Smith, Edward J 
Smallwood, C. E 



Sewell, Reuben . . 
Sperry, Samuel R. 

Stokley, Joseph . 
Sarch, John .... 



Private ■ Aug. 24, '61 3 



Sept. 6, '61 



Sept. 1, '61 
Sept. 1, '61 
Sept. 1, '61 
Aug. 27, '61 
Aug. 2S, '61 
Dec. 1, '62 
Sept. 6, '61 



Sept. 6, '61 
Nov. 1, '61 



Sept. 24, '61 I 3 



Aug. 25, '62 3 



Summers, Fred'k. 


Sept. 1, '61 


3 


Stevens, Harry . . 
Spencer, John 11. " 


Sept. 1, '61 
Aug. 27, '61 


3 
3 


Smith, James ... 1 " 
Stewart, Samuel P. " 


Apr. 30, '63 
Aug. 24, '61 


3 


Way, Joseph ... 
Willie, Theodore . 


Aug, 24, '61 
Sept. 1, '61 


3 
3 


Way, Thomas L, . " 
Wilson, John T. . 


Aug. 24, '61 
Aug. 24, '61 


3 

3 


Yocum, Jacob 1 1. 
Yeager, John . 


Sept. 1, '61 
Mar. 1, '62 


3 

3 



Wounded at Fair Oaks, May 31, 
1862 — discharged on Surg's 
certificate Aug. 25, 1862. 

Re-enlisted — transferred to Co. 
E, 82d P. V.— dis. July 17, '65 
— vet. — pro. to Sgt. Co. I. 

Deserted June 20, 1862. 

Deserted Nov. 26, 1861. 

Deserted Jan. 22, 1862. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Trans, to Co. F, 23d P. V. 

Disch. on Surg. cert. Dec. 10/62. 

Woun. and captured at Marye's 
Heights May 3, '63 — escaped 
and joined in charge on the 
heights — re-enlisted — trans- 
ferred to Co. E, S2d P. V.— 
discharged July 13, '65. — Vet. 

Re-enlisted — transferred to Co. 
E, S2d P.Y. — discharged July 
17, 1865— Yet. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
1S62, and at Marye's Heights 
May 3, 1863, and at Cold 
Harbor June 1, 1864 — re-en- 
listed — transferred to Co. E, 
S2d P.Y. — discharged July 17, 
1865.— Yet. 

Wounded at Winchester Sept. 
19, 1864— re-enlisted — trans, 
to Co. E, 82d P. Y.— dis- 
charged July 17, 1S65 — Vet. 

Transferred to 82d P. V.— dis- 
charged June 17, 1865. 

Died Nov. 3, 1861. 

Died Jan. 20, 1862. 

Killed at Marye's Heights May 
3. 1863. 

Deserted May t,, 1863. 

Trans, to Co. R, 23d P. V. 

Must, out with Co. Sept. 8, '64. 

Wounded at Malvern Hill July 
1, 1862 — mustered out with 
Co. Sept. 8, '64. 

Disch. on Surg. cer. Mar. 20/63. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
1.X62 — k'd at Marye's Heights 
May 3, 1863. 

Mus. out with Co. Sept 8, '64. 

K'd at Cold Harbor June 1/64. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



23] 



COMPANY H 

RECRUITED AT PHILADELPHIA 



Nun 



Dati 

oi Muster 

into Service 



Francis Keyser . 
James M. Craig . 



Captain . 



Aug. 
Aug. 



12, '6i 

24, '61 



Oct. 


■51, 


•61 


.i 


Aug. 


12, 


'61 


3 


Aug. 


2, 


'6i 


3 


Aug. 


2, 


'61 


3 


Aug. 


12, 


'61 


3 


Aug. 


10, 


'61 


3 



Aug. 10, '61 



Job T. Hickinan . 1st Lieut. Aug. 24/61 



Freder'k P. Backus 
John E. Collins . . 
Henry A. Marchant 
James M. Linnard 

Alexand'r D. Bailie 2d Lieut. 
James Spence. . . ; Sergeant 



John S. Linton 



Francis M. Worth . 



Stephen Palmore . 



Thos. H. .Michaels 



Cornelius Lukens . 



Saml. F. Bolton . 
Anthony Schaffer 



Jas. Fullerton . . . 
Geo. S. Slaysman . 
David H. Uber . . 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



20, '61 

13. *°i 
10, '6i 



Aug. 10, '61 



Corporal. 



Sept, 
Aug. 



21, '6l 

IO, '61 



Aug. 


15. 


'61 


Aug. 


24, 


'61 


Aug. 


20, 


•61 



Disch. by Spc.Ord. Sept. 2.8, '63. 

Died Feb. 2, 1899, of wounds 
received at Cold Harbor, June 
1, '64 — promoted from 2dLt., 
Co M., to 1st Lt., Jan. 1, '63, 
to Capt. Nov. 1, '63. — mus. 
out with Co. Sept. 8, 1S64. 

Promoted to 2d Lt., Jan. 1, '63, 
to 1st Lt., Jan. 1, '64. Mus. 
out with Co., Sept. S, 1S64. 

Resigned March 18, 1862. 

Resigned Oct. 31, 1861. 

Trans, to Co. F., May 1, 1S62. 

Promoted to Capt. Co. G., Jan. 
1, 1S63. 

Resigned May 1, 1S62. 

Promoted to Corp., Dec. 1, '62, 
to Sergt., Aug. 1, '64. Mus. 
out with Co., Sept. 8, 1864. 

YVd. at Fair Oaks, May 31, '62. 
Promoted to Corp., July 1/63, 
to Sergt., Aug. 1, '64. Mus. 
out with Co., Sept. 8, 1S64. 

Wd. at Malvern Hill, July i,'62. 
Color Sergt. Wounded and 
captured at Cold Harbor June 
1, 1864. Discharged. 

Wounded Marye's Heights, May 
3, '63 — re-enlisted and trans, 
to Co. E, 82d P. V., as 2d Lt. 
—disch. July 13, 1S65— Yet. 

Wounded at Malvern Hill, July 
1, '62, and Sailor's Creek, 
April 6, '65 — re-enlisted — 
transferred to 82d P. V. — 
discharged July 13, '65 — Vet. 

Wounded at Cold Harbor, June 
1, '64 — re-enlisted — trans, to 
Co. E, 82d P. V.— discharged 
July 13, '65— Vet. 

Killed at Fair Oaks while Color 
Sergt., May 31, 1862. 

Wd. at Gettysburg, July 3, '63, 
and Cold Harbor, June 1/64. 
Promoted to Corporal May 1, 
'63 — disch. Sept., '64 — died 
of wounds received at Cold 
Harbor. 

Promoted to Corporal, Aug. 1, 
'64 — discharged Sept., 1864. 

Promoted to Corporal, Aug. 1, 
'64 — discharged Sept., 1864. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks, May 31, 
1S62 — promoted to Corporal, 
Aug. 1/64 — disch. Sept., 1S64. 



232 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 




I'M! 

of Muster 
into Service 



John Gallagher . . Corporal. 
Wm. L. Uber . . . 

Geo. \V. Palmer . 



John Boyle .... 

Wm H. Garwood 

Wm. Beatty ... 

Geo. Howell . . . Musician. 

Andrews, Jas. C. . Private . 

Bothwell, John . . j 



Krinker, Henry P. 
Bell, George R. . 

Brown, James C. . 



Barry, Samuel . . 
Black, Charles . . 



Bastian, Wm. . 
Berringer, Wm. . 



C.Tvanagh.Wm. H 
Campbell, James 
( rear, Henry H. 



I oates, 1 lenry . 
Craig, David R. 

I limine, J( illll 

Childs, Stephen. 



( roitin, John . . . 
I luffofd, lames . , 
1 lel.mev, Mieh'l I- 



Sept. i, '6i 3 Re-enlisted — trans, to Co. E, 
S2d P. V. — discharged July 
13, '65— Vet. 

Aug. 20, '61 3 Wd. at Fair Oaks, May 31, '62,. 
and Marye's Heights, May 3, 
'63 — trans, to Vet. Reserve 
Corps — disch. Sept. 1S64. 

Nov. 1, '61 3 Re-enlisted — trans, to U. S. 
Navy April 1, 1S64 — dis- 
charged Nov. 9, 1S65. — Yet. 

Nov. 1, '6i 3 K'd at Malvern Hill July i, '62. 

Aug. 13, '61 3 Deserted Nov. 17, 1S61. 

Aug. 13, '61 3 Deserted Nov. 17, 1861. 

Sept. 15, '61 3 Trans to Co. E, 82d P. Y. 

Aug. 10, '61 3 Wounded at Malvern Hill July 
1, 1862 — deserted July 3, 1863. 

Aug. 20, '61 3 Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
1862 — mustered out with Co. 
Sept. S, 1864. 

Aug. 24, '61 3 Absent on detached sen ice 
at muster-out. 

Aug. 10, '61 3 Wounded at Malvern Hill July 
i, 1862 — re-enlisted — trans. 
to Co. E, 8 2 d P. V-Vet. 

Aug. 10, '61 3 Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
1862, and at Gettysburg July 
3, 1863 — re-enlisted — trans- 
ferred to Co. E, S2d P. V.— 
discharged July T3, '65 — Yet. 

Jan. 5, '64 3 Trans, to Co. E, 82d P. Y. — 
dis. July 13, 1865 — wounded 
at Cold Harbor June 1, 1864. 

Jan. 23, '64 3 Wounded at Cold Harbor June 
1, 1864 — transferred to Co. E, 
82d P. V.— dis. July 13, 1865. 

Aug. 5, '61 j 3 i Deserted Nov. 17, 1861. 

Sept. 24, '61 j 3 Wounded at Marye's Heights 
May 3, 1863 — deserted Jan. 20, 
1863 — returned and deserted 
again July 21, 1863. 

Aug. 18, '61 3 Mus. out with Co. Sept. 8, 1864. 

Sept. i, '61 3 Dis. on Surg. cer. ( >rt. is, 1861. 

Aug. 10, '61 3 Re-enlisted and transferred to 
Co. E, 82d P. V. — discharged 
July 13, 1865.— \ el. 

Aug. 24/6113 Transferred to Co. B; 23d P. V., 
March 15, [862. 

Aug. 24, '61 3 Transferred toGo. K, 23d P.V., 
Oct, 31, [862, 

Aug. 20, '61 3 Re-enlisted— transferred toCo. 

I , 82d P.V. discharged July 
13, 1865 — Yet. — wounded .11 
Marye's Heights May 3, [863. 
Aug. in, '61 3 Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
'62 — re-enlisted — transfei n 1 1 
to Co. F, 82d I'. V.- dis- 
charged jiuly 13, 1865. \ e|. 
Aug. 6, '63 3 Killed accidentally Oct. 20, '6a 
Aug. 24. '6j 3 Mus. out with Co, Sept. 8, '64, 
lug, 6, '6j 3 Disch. onSurg. cert. Feb. .■■ ,'6 . 



PENNSYLVANIA V( >LUNTEER INFANTRY. 



233 



\ IME 



K VNK 



Dati ^ 

01 MUSTE1 
INTO Sl-K\ ICE S 



Rl M \L: KS 



Davis, Theodon 



Dewald. Reuben 



Dyer, Francis 



Dubarry, Robt. S. 

Dougherty, Wni. . 
Earle, James C. . 
Foster. Wm. A. . 

Farrell, Wm. . . . 
Forsyth, Colin 
Glenn, John L. . . 



Griffith, John 



Granger, Wm. 
Hough, Wm. . 



Harris, Wm. . . . 
Haviland, John . 

Hagan, Barnett . . 

Hughes, Patrick . 
Haley, Patrick . . 
Heiler, Frank . 
Helfitch, Geo. . 

Hess, Chas. F. . . 

Hardcastle, James 
Johnson, John G. . 



'rivate . Aug. 16, '61 3 



Aug. 


10, 


'61 


3 


Vug. 


14, 


'63 


3 


Aug. 


24, 


'61 


3 


Aug. 


6, 


•61 


3 


Sept. 


3. 


'61 


3 


Aug. 


24, 


•61 


3 



Aug. 19, '61 



Jenkins, Benjamin 


Aug. 


20, 


'61 


Jones, Benjamin 


Sept. 


1, 


'62 


Kelly, John .... 


Aug. 


10, 


'61 


Kellev. Wm. . . 


Aug. 


10. 


'61 



Wounded at White < >ak Swamp 
June 30, 1S62, and at Cold 
Harbor — re enlisted — trans- 
ferred to Co. E, 82d P. V.— 
discharged July 13, '65. — Yet. 
Aug. 26, '61 3 Wounded at Marye's Heights 
May 3, 1863 — re-enlisted — 
transferred to Co. E, .Sad P. 
V'.— dis. July 13, 1865. — Vet. 
Aug. 13, '61 3 Re-enlisted — trans, to Co. E, 
82d P. V.— discharged July 
13. 1*65— Vet. 
Aug. 2, '61 3 Transferred to Co. K, 23d I '.Y., 
Dec. 1, 1S61. 
Deserted January 20, 1863. 
Deserted Sept. 1, 1863. 
Wounded five times at Fair 

Oaks May 31, 1862 — disch. 
Deserted Aug. 7, 1S61. 
Mus. out with Co. Sept. s,'64. 
Wound, at Fair Oaks May 31, 
1S62, and at Cold Harbor 
June 1, 1864 — mustered out 
with Co. Sept. S, 1864. 
3 Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
1862 — discharged on Surg, 
certificate April 15, 1863. 
3 Deserted Feb. , 1S64. 
3 Wounded at White Oak Swamp 
June 30, 1862 — discharged on 
Surgeon's cer. Jan. 3, 1863. 
3 Disch. on Surg. cert. Oct. 17, '62. 
3 Trans, to Co. E, 82d P.Y. — dis. 
on G. O. June 17, 1865. 
Transferred to Co. E, 82d PA'. 
— discharged July 13, 1865. 
3 Transferred to Co. E, Sad P.Y. 
3 Killed at Fair Oaks May 31/62. 
3 1 Deserted Jan. 20, 1863. 
3 Wounded at F~air Oaks May 31, 

1862 — deserted Aug., 1862. 
3 Disch. on writ of habeas corpus, 

1S62. 
3 Deserted May, 1S62. 
3 Wounded at Marye's Heights 
May 3, 1S63 — mustered out 
with Co. Sept. 8, 1S64. 
Re-enlisted — transferred to Co. 
E, S2d P.Y. — discharged July 
13, 1865— Vet. 
Wounded at Gettysburg July 3, 
1863— trans, to Co. E, S2d P. 
V. — discharged by general 
order, June 17, 1S65. 
Wounded at Malvern Hill July 
1, 1862 — discharged on Surg, 
certificate April 15, 1863. 
Deserted Aug.. 1S62. 



Jan. 
Aug. 



Aug. 
Sept. 



28, '64 
23, '61 



10, '61 
1, '62 



Jan. 15, '64 



Jan. 
Sept. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



24, '64 

6, '61 

15, '61 

15. '61 



Aug. 15, '61 



Aug. 
Aug. 



20, '61 
10, '61 



234 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 




Date 

of Muster 

into Service 



Kane. Thomas 
Landis, John . 

Lant, John A. 



Linton. Wm. . . . 
Lewis, Edward . . 
McCrossin, David 
McCarty, Patrick . 



Mickle, Adin B. 
Michals, Joseph . 

Milford, W. W. . 

Morris, Henry W. 

Mnnday, Cornelius 

Myers, Thomas . . 
Mack. Geo. W. . . 
Mann, Thomas . . 
Michals, Wm. B. . 



McCafferty, Jas. . 
McDermott. Philip 
McKenna, James . 



McGuire, Charles 
McGrey, Wm. . . 



McKinley, Henry 
McEwen, Lawr'nce 
Pommer, G. A. . 



Palmer, DeWittC. 



Pedrick, I laniel . 



Robinson, Wm. 



Ruby, Wm. 



Private . 



Aug. 
Aug. 



10, '61 
10, '61 



Sept. II, '61 



Sept. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Nov. 

Sept. 

Aug. 
Nov. 
Aug. 
Aug. 

Aug. 
Sept. 
Sept. 



Aug. 
Sept. 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



i,'6i 

13. '61 
ii, '61 
10, '61 



10, '6i 
6, '61 

21, '62 



6, '61 

i,'6i 

20, '61 

6, '61 



15. '61 
I, '61 
1, "6i 



6, '6i 
1, '62 



10, '61 
15/61 
10, '61 



1, '61 3 
6, '61 3 



Aug. 20, '61 3 



Aug. 13, '61 



Sept. 6, "6i 



Feb. 20, '62 



Deserted May 1, 1S64. 

Died Dec. 18, 1864, of wounds 
received at Cold Harbor June 
1, '64 — bur. at Hampton, \'a. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
1862 — transferred to Co. E, 
82d P. Y.— disch. Sept., 1864. 

Killed at F"airOaks May 31, '62. 

Deserted Aug., 1862. 

Deserted Jan., 1S63. 

Wounded at F"air Oaks May 31, 
1S62 — promoted to Sergeant 
July 17, 1864 — reduced. 

Wounded at Cold Harbor — 
mus. out with Co. Sept. 8,'64. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
1862 — discharged on Surg, 
certificate Aug. 12, 1862. 

Trans, to Co. E, S2d P. Y. and B. 
10th Y.R.C. — dis. June 27, '65. 

Transferred to Yet. Res. Corps 
Sept. 12, 1863. 

Died Aug. 19, 1862, of wounds 
rec. at Fair Oaks May 31, '62. 

K'd at Cold Harbor June i.'m- 

Deserted Sept. 10, 1863. 

Deserted Aug., 1862. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
1862 — discharged on Surg, 
certificate Aug. 12, 1862. 

Mus. out with Co. Sept. 8, '64. 

Mus. out with Co. Sept. 8. '64. 

Wounded at Marye's Heights 
May 3, 1863 — absent in hospi- 
tal at muster out. 

Dis. on Surg. cert. Sept. 13, '(S2. 

Transferred to Co. E. 82d P.V., 
and to Yet. Res. Corps — dis- 
charged June 26, 1865. 

Deserted Aug., 1862. 

Deserted Jan., 1863. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
1S62, and Cedar Creek Oct. 
1 g, 1864 — re-enlisted — trans- 
ferred to Co. E, 82d P. V.— 
discharged July 13, '65.- Vet. 

Re-enlisted — transferred to Co. 
E, 82d P. V.— died Dec. 6, 
1S64. of wounds rer'd at Win- 
chester Sept. 19, 1S64. — Yet. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
1862— discharged Nov. 2o,'62 
— re-enlisted Aug. 8. '6v in 
Co. H, 1st. V. R. C— dis- 
charged Nov. 17, 1S65. 

Wd. at Malvern Hill June 1, '62 
and Marye's Heights May 3, 
[863 — mustered out with Co. 
Sept. 8, 1864, 

Dis. on Surg. cert. Oct. 26, '62. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



235 











< 






Name 


K \NK 


ok Muster 
into Service 




Kl MARKS 



Roach, John . 



Private . Aug. 



Riley, Benj. S. . . 


July 


Reeves, Howell 


Sept. 


Rislcy, Annanias . 


" Aug. 


Staismore, W'm. . 


Sept. 


Smith, Janus M. . 


Aug. 


Smith, Sherw'd B. 


Sept. 


Slaysman, Chas. R. 


Aug. 


Steele, Washington 


Aug. 


Schall, Anthony . 


Sept. 


Stillwell, Cyrus . . 


July 


Stutzenbach, Emil 


Aug. 


Schenck. Adam . 
Smith, Wm. H. . 


July 

Sept 



Smith, Charles . 

Sands, David . . . 
Sodan, Robert . 

Smith, Frederick . 
Sweeney, John . 
Tripner, Geo. C. 
Truxall, George 
Umstead, Wm. . 

Wallace. James . 

Young, George . 



20, 


'6l 


3 


28, 


'6l 


3 


I, 


'6l 


3 


15. 


'6l 


3 


I, 


'6l 


3 


15, 


'6l 


3 


24. 


'6l 


3 


24. 


'62 


3 


20, 


'6l 


3 


I, 


'6l 


3 


13. 


•63 


3 


IO, 


'63 





■3. '63 

14, '61 



Sept. 6, '61 3 



Sept. 


20, 


'6l 


3 


Sept. 


20, 


•61 


3 


Jan. 


23, 


•64 


3 


Jan. 


28, 


'64 


3 


Aug. 


IO, 


'6l 


3 


Jan. 


13. 


'63 


3 


Aug. 


IO, 


'6l 


3 


Aug. 


29. 


'6i 


3 


Aug. 


15. 


'61 


3 



Re-enlisted— transferred to Co. 

E, S2d P. Y.— discharged July 

13, 1865.— Yet. 
Transferred to Co. R, 23d P.V. 

I >ec. I. 1 86l. 
Died at Washington, D. C, 
Feb. 4, 1S62 — buried in Mili- 
tary Asylum Cemetery. 
Wounded at Mane's Heights 
May 3, 1863— captured by 
Mosby 1S64. 
Wounded, bayonet wound, at 
Cold Harbor, June 1, 1S64 — 
mus. out with Co. Sept. S/64. 
Disch. on Surg. cert. Jan. 23, '63 
— re-enlisted I. A. i92d P. Y. 
July '64 — disch. Aug. 24, '65. 
Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
1S62 — transferred to Co. E, 
S2d P. Y.— dis. Oct. 20, '64. 
Transferred to Co. E, 8 2 d P.V. 
— disch. by G.O.. June 17, '65. 
Trans, to Co. E. S 2 d P.V — 
sentenced to Dry Tortugas. 
Re-enlisted — transferred to Co. 
E, S2d P. V. — discharged 
July 17, 1865 — Yet. 
Transferred to Co. E, 82d P.Y. 
—disch., by G O., May 23, '65. 
Transferred to Co. E, 82d P.V. 

— discharged July. 1S65. 

K'd at Cold Harbor June 1/64. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 

1862. and at Mane's Heights 

May 3, 1863— died June 2S, 

1S64, of wounds received at 

Cold Harbor June 1. 1S64 — 

buried in National Cemetery, 

Arlington, Ya. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 

1S62— deserted Jan., 1S63. 
Deserted Jan., 1S63. 
Wounded at Malvern Hill July 
1, 1 S62— deserted July 3, '63. 
Desetted Feb. 15, 1S64. 
Deserted Feb. 15, 1864. 
Disch. on Surg. cert. Jan. iS, '63. 
Transferred to Co. E, 82d P.V. 
Died July, 1S62, of wounds rec. 

at Fair Oaks May 31, 1862. 
Transferred to Co. K. 23d P.Y., 

Dec. 1, 1S61. 
Deserted Dec. 28, 1862. 



238 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



COMPANY I 

RECRUITED AT PHILADELPHIA 



Name 




Date 

of Muster 

into Service 



Frank Granello . . 
Chas. C. Haldem'n 



Captain . 



Aug. 
Aug. 



Henry A.Marchant " Aug. 

Gilbert Adams . . ist Lieut. Aug. 
Jesse S. Williams . 2d Lieut. Aug. 

Frank Taylor . . . [1st Sgt. . I Aug. 
Russell P. Howard Aug. 



William Morast . 
Wm. R. Hall . 
James M. Smith 
John keen . . . 
Robt. G. Bartel 



Wm. Stevens 



Win. 1 1. Sloan . 



Wm. H. Myers 



John 



1 'oners . 



Edward McMahon Corporal 

James McComb . 
Stephen Palmer . " 

Daniel H. Pedrick 
Jacob F. Albright 
1 li.n les Villain . . " 

Oliver McFadden . " 



l-'.lias Lomax 



John ( ',. Franklin 



13. '61 

13. '61 

2, '61 
13, '61 
19, '61 

13. '61 3 
13, '61 3 



Sergeant. Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



3 I Resigned Jan. 23, 1862. 
3 Promoted from ?d Lieut., Jan. 
23, 1S62 — Resigned Jan. 1/63. 
3 , Transferred from Co. F — killed 
at Cold Harbor, June 1, 1864. 
3 Detached Feb., 1862, on Gen. 

L. P. Graham's Staff. 

5 Promoted to Sgt., July 1, 1862 ; 

to 2d Lieut., Jan. 1, 1863 — 

mus. out with Co., Sept. S,' 64. 

Promoted to 2d Lieut. Co. G, 

23d P. V., July 22, 1862. 
Re-enlisted — trans, to Co. K, 
82d P. V. — pro. to 2d Lieut. 
— disch. July 13, 1865— Vet. 
13, '61 3 Absent at muster out. 
13, '61 3 i Transferred to Co. H, 23d P.V. 
J 3. '61 3 Transferred to Co. H, 23d P.V. 
13, '61 3 Transferred to Co. G, 23d P.V. 
13, '61 3 Wounded at Fair Oaks, May 
31, 1862 — pro. from ranks — 
mus. out with Co., Sept. 8, '64. 
Aug. 13, '01 3 Wounded at Cold 1 1 arbor, June 
1, 1864 — pro. from ranks — 
mustered out with Co., Sept. 
8, 1S64. 
Aug. 28/62 3 Wounded at Cold Harbor, June 
1, 1S64 — trans, to Co. C, S2d 
P. V. — disch. June 17, 1865. 
Sept. 4, '61 3 Re-enlisted — trans, to Co. K, 
82d P. Y. — pro. to 2d Lieut. 
— wd. at Marye's Heights, 
May 3, 1863 — killed at Sailor's 
Creek, April 6, [865. 
Aug. 13, '61 3 Promoted from ranks — died of 
wounds received at Cold 
Harbor, June 1, 1864. 
Not on muster-out roll. 
Not on muster-out roll. 
Transferred to Co. 1 1, 23d P.V. 
Transferred to Co. II, 23d P.V. 
Mus. out with Co., Sept 8, '64. 
Mus. out with Co.. Sept 8, '64, 
Wounded at Cold I [arbor, June 
1. 1S64 -mustered out with 
Co., Sept. 8, [86 1 
Aug. 2. 1, '62 3 Wounded at Gettysburg July 
3, 186-5— trans, in Co, II. 82a 
I'. V.- disch, fuly 17, iSn 5 — 
Vet. 
Aug 27, '62 3 Wounded at Cold Harbor. June 

1, 186,4 trans. I,, Co, II, si 

1'. V.— promoted to Sgt. Co. 

I— disch. July 17, [865 Vet. 



Aug. 


13. 


'6i 


3 


Aug. 


13, 


'61 


3 


Aug. 


13. 


'61 


3 


\u-,. 


1 1, 


•61 


3 


Sept. 


1, 


'61 


3 


Sept. 


1 , 


'61 


,1 


Aug. 


■3. 


'6i 


3 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



237 



Name 



I ' V I 1 

Rank i i] Mister 

into Service 



John S. Ohmit . . Corporal. Sept. 4, '61 



1 tenry Zimmerman 

John L. Grubb . . 

Frank Murphy . .Musician. 
Henry Laing . . . 
Albertson, Sam. W. Private . 

Aston, Isaac 

Bayley, James C. . 

Brown, John E. . 
Beck, John . 

Butcher, Alex. M. 

Butcher, Robt. A. 
Berger, Abram H. 

Butler, Joseph . . 

Berg, John D. . . 

Booth. Thomas . . 
Boyd, Robert . . . 



Blair, William P. . 
Brown, Edwin C. . 



Brooks, Geo. \V. 



Barrett, John . , 
Burns, James. . 



Si pt. 

Sept. 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



July 

Aua; 



4. '61 3 
4. '61 3 



13. ' 6l 3 
13. '61 
13. '61 ■ 

1,-63 



g- 13, '61 3 



Aug. 
Sept. 



13. '61 3 



4, '61 



Aug. 6, '61 I 3 



Mar. 


19. 


•63 


3 


Sept. 


4, 


'6i 


3 


Aug. 


13. 


'6i 


3 


Aug. 


8, 


•61 


3 


Aug. 


3' 


•63 


3 


Aug. 


19. 


'61 


3 



Aug. 

Aua:. 



Aug. 13, '6i 



'3- ' 6 i 3 
13- ' 6 i 3 



lulv 
Feb. 



15- '63 3 



Wounded at Cold Harbor, June 
1. E864 — re-enlisted — trans. 
to Co. H, 82d P. V.— disch. 
July 17, 1S65— Yet. 

Wounded at Gettysburg, July 
3, 1S63 — killed at Cold Har- 
bor, June 1, 1S64. 

Wounded and captured at Cold 
Harbor, June 1, 1S64 — re-en- 
listed—trans, to S2d P. \'. — 
disch. July 17, 1S65 — Vet. 

Mus. out with Co., Sept. 8, 1864. 

Mus. out with Co., Sept. 8, 1864. 

Mustered out with Co., Sept. 
S, 1S64. 

Drafted — trans, to Co. H, 82d 
P. Y.— disch. July 13, 1.865. 

Re-enlisted — trans, to Co. H, 
82d P. V. — wd. at Sailor's 
Creek, April 6, 1S65 — disch. 
July [3, 1S65 — Vet. 

Killed at Cold Harbor, June 1, 
1 N64. 

Re-enlisted — trans, to Co. H, 
S2d P. Y. — wounded at Cold 
Harbor, June 1, 1864 — disch. 
July 13, 1865— Yet. 

Re-enlisted — trans, to Co. H, 
82d P. Y. — disch. July 13, 
1865— Vet. 

Transferred to Co. H, 82d P.V. 
— discharged June 20, 1S65. 

Wounded at Marye's Heights, 
May 3, 1863 — re-enlisted — 
trans, to Co. H, 82d P. V— 
disch. June 20, 1S65 — Yet. 

Re-enlisted — trans, to Co. H, 
82d P. V. — discharged July 
13. 1865— Vet. 

Re-enlisted — trans, to Co. H, 
82d P. Y.— discharged July 
13, 1S65— Yet. 

Drafted— trans, to Co. H, 82d 
P. V.— disch. July 13, 1865. 

Wounded at Malvern Hill, July 
1, [862; at Gettysburg, July 
3, 1863, and at Cold Harbor, 
June 1, 1S64 — re-enlisted — 
trans, to Co. H, 82d P. V.— 
disch. July 13, 1865 — Vet. 

Killed at Fair Oaks, May 31, '62. 

Re-enlisted — wd. at Marye's 
Heights. May 3, 1S63 — killed 
at Cold Harbor, June 1, 1864 
—Yet. 

Wounded at Marye's Heights, 
May 3, iS63 — disch., date un- 
known. 

Deserted Aug. 24, 1S63. 

Deserted Dec, 1S63. 



238 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



Nami 




Date 
of Muster 

into Sua I. I 



Boas, Jacob R. . 
Burns, John . . 
Bulner, Edward 
Bartell, John . . 



Christy, John . . . 

Coakley, John . . 

Cline, Frank . . . 

Crandell, Charles. 
Cooley, Joseph . . 

Carpenter, Wm. . 



Childs, John 

Coles, James M.D. 
Crear, Harry H, . 
Dunbar, Robt. S. . 
Detrick, Joseph . . 



Daily, James . . . 

I )unbar, Thomas . 
Dickey, W'm. M. . 

Dean, Joseph . . . 

Dome, Frederick . 
1 lunkle, John . . . 
Duffy, William . . 
Dick, John .M. , . 
Dinsmore, John. . 
Eisenberger, Mart 
Foster, \\'in. A. 
Francis, I [enry P. 
Fry, I (avid .... 

Fallon, John . . 

Fry, Jacob I>. . . . 
I' isher, William . . 
Fullerton, J. . . . 
Gormley, John 



Private 



Aug. 10, '63 

Aug. 12, '63 

Aug. 13, '61 

Aug. 13, '61 



Sept. 1, '61 

Aug. 13, '6i 

July 28, '63 

Aug. 12, '63 
Aug. 6, '61 

Aug. 13, '6i 



Aug. 13, '61 

Aug. 13, '61 

Aug. 13, '61 

Aug. 13, '61 

Aug. 19, '61 



Aug. 30, '61 

Sept. 4, '61 

Sept. 4, '61 

Sept. 4, '61 

Aug. 12, '63 

July 11, '63 

Aug. 13, '61 

Aug. 13, '61 

Aug. 13, '61 

Sept. 1, '61 

Aug. 13, '61 

Aug. 13, '61 

Sept. 1, '61 

July 15, '63 



( ".rubh, Jacob A. . 



Aug. n, ''.3 > 

Feb. 8, '64 3 

Aug. 17. '64 5 

Aug. 20, '6i 3 



Aug. 20, '61 



Drafted — deserted Mar. 14, '64. 

Drafted— deserted Mar. 18, '64. 

Trans, to Co. K, 23d P. Y. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks, May 
31, 1862 — absent in hospital 
at muster-out. 

Wounded at Cold Harbor, June 
1, 1864— disch. Sept., 1864. 

Discharged on Surgeon's cer- 
tificate, date unknown. 

Drafted — trans, to Co. H, 82d 
P. \'.— disch. July 13, 1865. 

Deserted Aug. 24, 1863. 

Re-enlisted — trans, to 82d P.V. 
— disch. July 13, 1S65 — Vet. 

Wounded and captured at Cold 
Harbor, June 1, 1864— died 
Feb. 21, 1S65, of wounds re- 
ceived at Cold Harbor, June 
1, 1S64 ; buried 1st Div.,Gen. 
Hospital Cemetery, Annapo- 
lis, Md. 

Killed at Malvern Hill, Julvi, 
1862. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Transferred to Co. H. 23d P.V. 

Mus. out with Co. Sept. 8, 1864. 

Wounded at Cold Harbor, June 
1, 1S64— mustered out with 
Co., Sept. 8, 1S64. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks, May 31, 
1862 — mustered out with Co., 
Sept. 8. 1S64. 

Mustered out with Co., Sept. 
8, 1S64. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks, May 
31. 1862 — discharged on Sur- 
geon's cert., date unknown. 

Re-enlisted — transferred to 82d 
P. Y.— Vet. 

I leserted Aug. 24, 1863. 

Drafted -trans, to 82d P. V. 

Transferred to Co. P, 23d P.V. 

Transferred to Co. H, 23d P.V. 

Transferred to Co. K, 23d PA'. 

Absent sick at muster-out. 

Transferred to Co. H, 23d P.V. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Absent on detached service 

in 1st Pa. Artillery. 
Drafted -transferred to Co. H, 

82d I'. V. 
Drafted— deserted Mar. 1, [864. 
Transferred to Co. II. 23d P.V. 
Transfi rred i<> Co. II, 23d P.V. 

Wounded at Fair < )aks, M.i\ 
51, [862 mustered oul with 
Co., Sept. s, 1864. 

Mus. i>iit w ith Co., Sept. s. [86 1. 



PENNSYLVANIA V< (LUNTEER INFANTRY. 



239 



N \MI 




I'll I 

nl Ml S[ ! i: 
INTO SER\ IC E 



Goodsmith, Frank Private 



Green, William 



i roi ii Iwin, John . 
Gibbs, Charles . 
Hambright, C. K. 



Harris, Samuel 



Henderson, Jacob 
Harrington, Jacob 

Hess, Gottlieb . . 
Hernley, Abr'm H. 



Harrie, Emil . 
Holmes, John 
Irwin, William 



Kline, George H. 
Kerr, John .... 

Kling, John . . . 

Lee, John .... 

Lewenberg, Jos. . 

Lewis. Henry C. . 
Lucas, Albert G. . 

Markley, Samuel . 
Moss, Madison B. 

Maloney, Wm. M. 
Mitchell, Thomas 

Miller, Robert . 

Murry, John . . . 



Sept. 
Aug. 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



4, '6' 3 



13- '6i 



'6i 

'63 
•6i 



Sept. 4, '6i 

'63 
'63 

'61 
'61 



•63 
'61 
'61 



July 


10, 


July 


6, 


Aug. 


2, 


Aug. 


13. 


July 

Aug. 

Aug. 


Hi 

13. 
19. 


Aug. 


13. 


Aug. 


20, 


Aug. 


3> 


Sept. 


1, 



'61 3 

'6i 3 

'61 3 

•61 3 

Aug. 13, '61 3 



Aug. 
Aug. 


13. 
13. 


Aug. 
Aug. 


13- 
20 


Aug. 


r 3> 


Sept. 


1 



'61 

'61 

•61 
'61 



Aug. 19, 



Aug. 



'61 




'61 


3 


'61 


3 


•61 


3 



Re-enlisted — transferred to Co. 
H, S2d P. V. — discharged 

July 13, 1865 — Yet. 
Re-enlisted— transferred to Co. 

11, S2d P. Y. — discharged 

July 13, 1065— Yet. 
Died in service, date unknown. 
Deserted Aug. 24, 1863. 
Discharged Feb. 14, 1863, by 

order of Secretary of War. 
Re-enlisted— transferred to Co. 

11, S2d P. Y. — discharged 

July 13, 1865— \'et. 
Drafted — transferred to Co. H, 

*2d P. Y. — disch. July 13, '65. 
Drafted — transferred to Co. 11, 

82d P. V. — discharged by G. 

O., Aug. 3, 1865. 
Drafted — transferred to Co. H, 

82d P. Y. — disch. July 13, '65. 
Re-enlisted— transferred to Co. 

H, 82d P. Y. — discharged 

July 13, 1865 — Yet. 
Drafted — deserted Mar. 11, '64. 
Transferred to Co. H, 23d P.Y . 
Re-enlisted — transferred to Co. 

H, S2d P. Y. — discharged 

July 13, 1865 — Yet. 
Died Jan. r, 1863 ; buried at 

Alexandria, Ya. , grave 653. 
Re-enlisted — transferred to 82d 

P. V. — discharged July 17, 

1S65— Yet. 
Drafted — transferred to Co. H, 

82d P. Y. — deserted Aug. 

24, 1S64. 
Re-enlisted — transferred to Co. 

H, S2d P. Y. — discharged 

July 13, 1865— Yet. 
Discharged by order of Gen. 

Heintzelman. 
Discharged Dec, 1862. 
Wounded at Malvern Hill, July 

1, 1S62 — disch. for wounds. 

Mus. out with Co. .Sept. 8, 1864. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks, May 

31, 1S62 — disch. on Surg. cert. 
Wounded at Marye's Heights, 

May 3, 1863— discharged on 

Surgeon's certificate. 
Re-enlisted — transferred to Co. 

H, 82d P. V. — wounded at 

F'air Oaks, May 31, 1S62— 

disch. July 13, 1865— Vet. 
Re-enlisted— transferred to Co. 

H, 82d P. Y.— wounded at 

Mine Run, Nov., 1863— disch. 

July 13, 1S65 — Yet. 
Drafted transferred to Co. H, 

S2d P. V.— disch. July 13, '65. 



24.0 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



Name 



Date 

PF Muster 

into Service 



Morris'n, Geo.E.L. Private . Aug. 10, '63 3 



Meyers, William . 
Maholland, Thos 



Mahoney, Dennis 
McMisk, John . . 
McCoffee, Robt. 



McMeekin, Robt. . 



McCucken, Andr. 
McCullen, Henry . 

Nolen, Patrick . . 

Nargrave, Wood'd 

Osborn, Isaac E. . 



Rodgers, John B. 

Kolin, John A. . . 
Raphund, John H. 

Rodgers, John . . 

Reed, Abner H. . 

Rakes, James H . . 
Richards, Thus. . 
Rhoades, Henry . 
Ruth, Beneville S. 



Shue, George 



Spence, Samuel 
Stull, Edward L. 
Siple, Benjamin 



Stauffer, Abraham 



Seifred, Geo II 



Feb. 
Aug. 

Aug. 
Aug. 
Sept. 



10, '63 
20, '61 



13, '61 

13, '61 

4, '61 



Aug. 13, '61 3 



Nov. 
Aug. 



13, '62 
13. ' 6l 



Sept. 4, '61 



Aug. 
Aug. 



13, '61 
6, '61 



Feb. 
Sept. 



Aug. 12, '63 
Aug. 



Oct. 
Inly 
Aug. 
July 



Sept. 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



Sept. 



Sept. 



Sept. 4, '61 3 



I, '63 

1, '61 



10, 


'63 


3 


8, 


'62 


^ 


17, 


'63 


3 


13, 


'63 


3 


IO , 


03 


3 


1, 


'61 


3 


13. 


•61 


3 


[9, 


'6i 


1 


13, 


'61 


3 


4, 


'hi 


3 


4. 


'6l 


3 



Drafted— killed at Cold Har- 
bor, June 1, 1864. 

Deserted Aug. 24, 1S63. 

Re-enlisted — transferred to Co. 
H, 82d P. V.— discharged 
July, 1865— Vet. 

Transferred to 61st P. V. 

Transferred to Co. H, 23d P.V. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks, May 3 1 , 
1862 — re-enlisted — trans, to 
Co. H, 82d P. Y.— Yet. 

Re-enlisted — transferred to Co. 
H, 82d P. V.— wounded at 
Gettysburg, July 3, 1S63 — 
discharged July 13, '65 — Vet. 

Transferred to Co. H, 82d P.V. 

Re-enlisted — absent at muster 
out — Yet. 

Transferred to Co. H, 82d P.V. 
— discharged Sept. , 1864. 

Discharged Aug. 16, 1861. 

Transferred from Co. K, 23d P. 
V. — mustered out with Co., 
Sept. 8, 1S64. 

Wounded at Marye's Heights, 
May 3, 1863 — transferred to 
82d P. Y. 

Transferred to S:d P. Y. 

Re-enlisted — transferred to 82d 
P.V. — disch. July 17/65 — Yet. 

Drafted — transferred to Co. H, 
S2d P. Y. — disch. July 1 3, "s. 

Drafted— killed at Cold Hal 
bor, June 1, 1S64. 

Deserted Jan. 31, 1863. 

Drafted — deserted Man h 9,'64. 

Deserted March 9, 1864. 

Drafted— wounded and cap- 
tured at Cold I larbor, June 1, 
1864 — Died in Andersonville, 
Nov. [6, [864, of wounds ; 
grave 12,048. 

Wounded at Cold 1 larbor, June 
1, [864— mustered out with 

Co., Sepl. 8, 1 S». i _ 

Mus. out with Co., Sept. 8, '6 |. 
Mus. out with Co., Sept. 8, '64. 
Wounded .11 Malvern I [ill, July 

I, [862- discharged on Surg, 
ceil.. April .), 1N1.;, 

Re enlisted transferred to Co. 

I I, sjd I'. V. \\ ounded ai 
( 'old I [arbor, June 1. 1864 
disch. July 13. [865 Vet. 

Wounded .it Cold I [arbor, June 
1, [864 te enlisted nans. 
to Co II, 8sd P. \ . di.-, 1 ,,t 

wounds ree'd at Cold 1 larbor. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



I'll 



N wii 



DAT] 

OK Ml 

into 5er via 



Remarks 



Shaffer, Jacob 
Sln-rick, John . 



Private 



Todd, Jacob . . . 

Thedford, Thos. . 

Tinestin, Charles . 
Updegroff, Julius . 
Will. Norman S. . 

Wallis, Charles . . 

Wike, George W 



Waj lie, John H. 



July ii, 
Aug. 13, 



61 3 
'6i 3 



St. nib, John . . . 


A11-. 


13, 


'61 


3 


Stevens, Kennedy 


Apr. 


*3> 


'61 


3 


Stoub, Peter . . . 


Aug. 


13, 


•61 


3 


Snnck, Franklin . 


Aug. 


1.S1 


'61 


3 


Shenberger, Jas. . 


Aug. 


13. 


'61 


3 



Sept. 4, '6i 



Oct. 8, '62 3 



Aug. 13, '61 



Wagoner, Wm. . . " 
Welding, James . 


Sept. 4, '6r 
Aug. 13, '61 


3 

3 


Yentzer, Christian 


Aug, 19, '61 


3 


Yinger, Abraham. " 


July 12, '63 


3 



Aug. 


13, 


'61 


3 


Aug. 


13. 


'6i 


3 


Aug. 


13. 


•61 


3 


Sept. 


8, 


'62 


3 


Sept. 


4. 


'61 


3 



Drafted— transferred to Co. H, 
82d P. V. — disch July 13, '65. 

Wounded atWhiteOakSwamp, 
June, [S62— absent in hospi- 
tal at muster-out. 

Drowned Aug. 18, 1861. 

Disch. Apr. 28,'62onSurg. cert. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Transferred to Co. K, 23d P.V. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks, May 
31, 1862 — absent in hospital 
at muster-out. 

Wd. at Cold Harbor, June 1, '64 
— re-enlisted — trans, to S2d P. 
V.— disch July 17, '65— Vet. 

Transferred to Co. H, 82d P. 
V. — discharged July 13, 1865. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Mus. out with Co., Sept. 8, '64. 

Discharged for wounds rec'd 
at Fair Oaks. 

Discharged by order of Maj.- 
Gen. I leintzelman. 

Transferred to Co. H, 82d 
P. V.— Missing at Marye's 
Heights, May 3, 1S63— wd. at 
Cold Harbor, June 1, 1S64 — 
discharged Sept., 1864. 

Wounded at Malvern Hill, July 
1, 1S62 — absent in hospital at 
muster-out. 

Deserted July 2, 1S63. 

Re-enlisted — transferred to 82d 
P. V — wounded at Cold Har- 
bor, June 1, 1S64. 

Re-enlisted — transferred to Co. 
H, S2d P. V.— wounded at 
Cold Harbor, June 1, 1864. 

Transferred to S2d P. V. 



COMPANY II 

RECRUITED AT PHILADELPHIA 



Fred'k F. Cavada. Captain. . Aug. 6, '61 3 



Henry Rees, Jr. 



Louis J. Howard 



1st Lt . 



Aug. 4, '61 



Aug. 6, '61 



Resigned July 20, '62 — com. Lt.- 
Col. 114th P. V. — Com.- 
in-chief Cuban Insurgents — 
captured by Spaniards and 
executed July, '71, Mercades, 
Cuba. 

Prom, to Capt., July 20, 1862 — 
Com. Major 23d P. V. — mus. 
out with Co. Sept. 8, 1864. 

Resigned 1862 to accept Cap- 
taincy on staff of Gen. E. D. 
Keyes. 



242 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 




Edward B. Wilson, ist Lt 



James M. Linnard. 2d Lt . 
Jas. G. Williamson 

Wm. H. Nealle . . ist Sgt 
Alfred H. Qifford. Serg't . 

Geo. E. Webb . 



Abrani Fink . . 
Ira Webster . . 

John Dinsmore . 
Fred'k P. Simon 

Franklin Smeck 



Aug. 2, '61 3 



J. C. McLaughlin 
Jas. J. Bolestridge 



Jesse H. Cornell 



Alonzo Fugleman. 
John ( iorman . . . 



John J. Howe . 



John F. Mild . . 



Corp. 



Aug. 2, 
Aug. 24, 

Aug. 6, 
Aug. 6, 



•61 3 
'61 3 



61 



61 3 



Aug. 6, '61 I 3 



Aug. 


6, 


'61 


3 


Aug. 


6, 


'6i 


3 


Aug. 


n, 


'61 


3 


Sept. 


4, 


'61 


3 



Aug. 13, '61 3 



Aug. 6, 
Aug. 6, 



•61 3 

'61 3 



Aug. 6, '61 3 



Aug. 6, 
Aug. 6, 



•61 3 
'6. 3 



Aug. 6, '61 3 



Sept. 9, '6i 3 



Wd. at Gettysburg July 3, '63 — 
prom. 2d Lt. Aug. 31, '62, to 
ist Lt. Sept. i, '63 — mustered 
out with Co. Sept. 8, 1864. 

Promoted to ist Lt. Co. H, 23d 
P. V., Aug. 25, 1S62. 

Promoted from Sergt. July 1, 
1863 — died June 2, 1S64, of 
wounds received at Cold Har- 
bor June 1, 1864. 

Discharged July 17, 1862 for 
wounds received at Malvern 
Hill July 1, 1862. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
1862 — prom, to Sergt. Aug. 
1, 1S62 — mustered out with 
Co. Sept. 8, 1864. 

Disch. on Surg. cert. Sept. 25, 
'62 — re-enlisted Dec. 12, '63, 
Co. M, 3d N. Jersey Cav. — 
disch. Sergt. -Maj. Aug. 1, '65 
— com. istLt. — not mustered. 

Discharged of Surg. cert. Jan., 
1863. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks, May 31, 
1862 — prom, to Sergt. -Major 
23d P. V., Aug. 31, 1862. 

Re-enlisted — transferred to 82d 
P. V.— disch. July 17, '65— Vet. 

Re-enlisted — transferred to 82d 
P. V. — discharged July 17, 
1865— Yet. 

Re-enlisted— transferred to 82d 
P. V. — discharged July 17, 
1865— Vet. 

Died Aug. 6, 1862. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks, May 31, 
'62 — wounded twice at Cold 
Harbor, June ), '64 — prom. 
to Corp. Oct., 1X62— must, 
out with Co. Sept. 8, 1S64. 

Wounded at Malvern Hill July 
1, 1S62 — prom, to Corp. Sept. 
1863 — mustered out with Co. 
Sept, 8, 1864. 

Died May, 1863. 

Wounded at Cold Harbor June, 
1, 1864 — prom, to Corp. May 
1, 1S64 — must, out with Co. 
Sept. s, [864. 

Wounded at Fair < >aks May 31, 

1. Si,.' wounded and captured 
,il (did Harbor June 1, '64 — 
released April 7, '65 — re-en- 
listed -discharged June 20, 
[865— Vet. 
Died of wounds received in 
front of Petersburg, Aug. 1, 
1864. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



243 



Nami 


Rank 


Dati 

oi \i ii 
i \ i , i Service 


< 
- 
> 

! 

>•- 

- 


W. 1 1. Lancashire. 


i Corporal. 


Aug 


6, '6i 


3 


Maurice L. Spear. 


" 


Aug 


6, '6i 


3 


G. W. Woodhouse 


" 


Aug 


6, '6i 


3 


John Zaun .... 


" 


Aug 


6, '6i 


3 


II. G. Edmundson 


Musician. 


Aug 


[3, '"i 


3 



James K. Milltnau 



Aug. 6, '6i 



Daniel Williams . 


ii 


Feb. 


8, '64 


3 


Armstrong. II. J. . 


Private 


Sept. 


5. '6i 


3 


Albertson, Levi P>. 
Allen, John . . 


" 


Uig. 
Aug. 


6, '6i 

6, '6i 


3 
3 


Armstrong, C. E. . 


" 


Aug. 


6, '6i 


3 


Borland, Jas. W. . 


" 


Aug. 


6, '6i 


3 


Bishop, Edward . 
Bagley, Richard . 
Buhner, Edward . 


(i 


Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 


6, '6i 
6, '6i 
6, '6i 


3 

3 
3 


Brown, Jos. C. . . 
Bishop, Samuel S. 




Aug. 

Aug. 


6, '6i 
6,'6i 


3 
3 


Bower, George . . 
Beardmore, T. C. 


( 1 


Aug. 
Sept. 


13. '61 
4, '61 


3 

3 


Bryon, Charles H. 


«' 


Aug. 


6, '61 


3 


Boyle, Isaac . . . 


" 


Aug. 


6, '6i 


3 


Boyd, James . . . 
Barger, Jacob . . 


(I 

(( 


Aug. 
Aug. 


'61 
'6i 


3 
3 


Badger, Augustine 
Brown, John . . . 
Brenan, Angus . . 
Bothnel, John . . . 
Bennett. Henry . . 


i I 


Aug. 
Aug. 
\ug. 
July 
Aug 


10, '63 
I3> '63 

11, '63 
28, '63 

6, *6i 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



I »isi harged on Surg certificate 

Sept, 15, 1861. 
Re-enlisted — transferred to 82d 

P. \'.— wd. at Cold Harbor, 

June 1, 1S64- — discli. July 17. 

1865— Vet. 
Discharged on Surg, certificate 

Aug. 12. 1862. 
Killed at Cold Harbor June 1, 

[864. 
Re-enlisted — transferred to 82d 

P. V. — discharged July 17. 

1865— Vet. 
Re-enlisted — transferred to 82d 

P. V. — discharged July 17, '65 

—Vet. 
Transferred to 82d P. V. — dis- 
charged July 13, 1S65. 
Mustered out with Co. Sept. 8, 

1864. 
Transferred to Co. R, 23d P. V. 
Died March 10, 1862, buried in 

Military Asylum Cem., D. C. 
Re-enlisted — deserted April 28, 

1S64— Yet. 
Wounded at Gettysburg July 3, 

1S63 — mustered out with Co. 

Sept. 8, 1864. 
Must, out with Co. Sept. 8, 64. 
Disch. Surg. cert. July 10, 1862. 
Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 

1S62 — discharged Surg. cert. 

Sept. 25, 1862. 
Trans, to Co. M., 23d P. V. 
Re-enlisted — transferred to S2d 

P. Y. — discharged July 17, 

1865— Yet. 
Died Nov. 21, 1861. 
Died June 6, 1864, of wounds 

received at Cold Harbor June 

1, 1S64. 
Wounded in front of Richmond 

June S, 1 S62— killed at Cold 

Harbor June 1, 1S64. 
Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 

1862 — re-enlisted — deserted 

April 28, 1S64 — Yet. 
Deserted — date unknown. 
Died April 27, 1S65, of wounds 

received in front of Peters- 
burg — buried at Portsmouth 

Grove, R. I. 
Drafted— deserted May 5, 1S64. 
Drafted — deserted Sept. 20, '63. 
Drafted — deserted Jan. 5, 1864. 
Drafted — deserted Aug. 16, '63. 
Transferred to Co. I, 23d P. V. 



244 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 




Aug. 


I.v 


'61 


3 


Aug. 


24. 


'61 


3 


Aug. 


6, 


'hi 


3 


Sept. 


t8, 


'61 


3 


Dec. 


24. 


'61 


3 


Sept. 


6, 


'61 


3 


Aug. 


10, 


'63 


3 


Aug. 


6, 


'6.3 


3 


Aug. 


10, 


'<»3 


3 


Aug. 


6, 


'61 


3 


Sept. 


15. 


'61 


3 


Sept. 


16, 


'61 


3 


Aug. 


6, 


'61 


3 


Aug. 


6, 


'61 


3 



Cooney, Jas. G. . Private. Aug. 6,' 16 



Colgan, James . . , 
Craig, I )avid K. . 



Carmines, Thos. . 

Carstaire, Robt. L. 
Costello, Wm. . 

Carnahan, Robt. 
Clay, Frank . . . 
Caldwell, Andrew. 
Collins, James . . 
Cummings, Thos. 
Davis, Wm. A. . . 
Deacon, Howard . 
Donnelly, James . 



Donaghey, John . 
I luncan, William . 
Davis, Arthur . . 



Davis, Dennis . . 
Dougherty, Patrick 
Dougherty, John . 
Dugan, James . . 
I 1. lily. Hiram . . . 
I lunlevy, Louis . . 
Eisenbarth, Edw. . 



Ellis, Geo. I 1 '. . 
F.nnis, [saai I 1 
parren.Wm. J. . 



Finlej . Wm. . . . 

Fox, 1 >eo. F. . . . 
Farrow, 1 ieo. W. . 

Grindred, John . 
< rraham, Thomai 



Aug. 1, '61 



Sept. 9, '61 



Sept. 5, '61 
Aug. 10, '63 
Aug. 10, '63 
Aug. 6, '61 
Aug. 30, '64 
Aug. 10, '63 
Aug. 6, '61 



Aug. 6, '61 
Aug. 6, '61 
Aug. 6, '61 



Aug. 2, '61 

Aug. 6, '61 

Aug. 6, ''■! 

Aug. 6, '61 

Sept. 1, '61 



Died June 2, is.62, of wounds 
received at Fair Oaks May 
31, 1S62. 

Must. out with Co. Sept. 8, '64. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
1862, Marye's Heights May 3, 
1863 — disch. on Surg. cert. 
Dec. 1, 1S63. 

Discharged on Surg, cert., July 
20, 1862. 

Transferred to Co. R, 23d P. V. 

Transferred to Co. H, 82d P. V. 
— discharged Dec. 13, 1864. 

Mustered out Sept. 13, 1S64. 

Drafted— trans, to 82d P. Y. 

Killed at Fair Oaks May 31 , '62. 

Drafted — deserted Oct. 1, 1863. 

Not on muster out roll. 

Transferred to Co. R, 23d P. V. 

Transferred to Co. R, 23d P. V. 

Re-enlisted — transferred to 82(1 
P. Y, — wounded at Cold Har- 
bor June 1, 1864 — disch. July 
17, 1865 — Yet. 

Re-enlisted — transferred to 82d 
P. Y. — killed at Winchester 
Sept. 19, 1864 — Yet. 

Transferred from Co. F — re- 
enlisted— trans, to S2d P. V. 
— discharged July 13, 1S65. 

Wounded at Cold Harbor June 
1, 1S64 — transferred to 82d 
P. V. 

Transferred to S2d P. Y. 

Drafted — trans, to 8zd P. Y. 

Drafted— trans, to N 2 d P. Y. 

Deserted Nov. 15, 1862. 

Not on muster out roll. 
Drafted — deserted 1853. 
Re-enlisted — wd. at Marye's 
Heights. May 3, (863— killed 
at told 1 [arbor, lime 1, 1S64 
—Yet. 
Deserted Nov. 26, [861. 
Transferred to Co. II, 23d P.V. 
Wounded at Malvern Hill. July 
1, 1862— mustered out with 
Co., Sept. 8, 1864. 

Re-enlisted transferred to 82d 
P, V.— discharged |uly 17, 
[865 Vet. 

I lied Jan. 25, [862 

Re-enlisted — deserted Feb. 12, 
[864 - Vet. 

Wounded at Fair 1 laks, May 

31, 1862 discharged on Surg. 
cert , 1 let. 1, 1862. 

ke enlisted deserted Feb. 12, 

1864— Vet. 



n NNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



245 



Datb 

OF Ml 
[NTO Si 



Remarks 



Granello, (ieo. \V. 

Hall, William H. 

1 la\ 'lis, Joseph . . 
llii ks. Thomas . . 
1 lamilton, Wilson. 
Harp, Jacob . . . 



Hankins, ( ieo. J. . 
1 [offman, John F. . 
1 lamilton, Win. . 
Hollock, Thomas. 
Harty. Michael . . 
Ills, mi, Richard . . 



Jones, Win. . . . 
Joynes, Richmond. 

Krepps, Peter. . . 

Kelly, James . . . 

Kelly, John . . . . 
Krunnshield, J. 1 1. 

Kaesch, Herman 
Kelly, John T. . . 
Kafer. Pierson . 
Kardner, George . 
Lane, Joseph . . . 

Lewis. Samuel S. 

Lelarge. Wm. . . 
Lane, Daniel . . . 
Murgatroyd, John. 

Murphy. Richard . 

Maxwell, Chas. A. 
Meehan, John S. . 

Meehan, Thomas . 
Mergenthaler, C. . 
Matiack, Wm. H. 
Mason, Daniel . . 

Miles, Wm. J. . . 
McByme, Chas. . 

McKnight, Jonn . 

McMinn, Harry H. 

McGuire, Chas. F. 
McKim, Henry . . 
McComb, Thomas 



nvate 



Aug. 

Aus. 

Aug. 

Sept. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



Feb. 
Aug. 

July 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



Sept. 

Aus. 
Aug. 



6, '6i 3 



6, '6i 

6, '6i 
io, '6i 
24, '6i 

2, '6l 



5, '64 3 

6, '61 3 
22, '63 3 

6, '61 3 

6, '61 3 

6, '61 5 



12, '61 

4, '64 

24, '61 



Aus. 
Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 
July 
July 
Aug. 



Aug. 24, '61 



Au.u. 
Ans. 
Aus. 



Sept. 
Feb. 

Feb. 
Aug. 

Aug. 
Aug. 

Aug. 
Aug. 

Aug. 

Aus- 

Aus. 

Jan. 

July 



20, M 
18, '62 

I \ '62 

I, '63 

6, '6i 
10, '63 

6, '61 
13. '61 

6, '61 

6, '61 

6, '61 
28, '62 
15, '63 



Sept. 11, '61 



10, '63 I 3 
6, '61 3 

6, '61 3 
10, '63 3 

29. '63 i 3 
28, '63 3 
24, '6 1 3 

3 



6, '61 

6, '61 
6, '61 



Jan. 7, '62 



Transferred to 82d P. V. — dis- 
charged. 

1 lischarged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate, Ni iv. I 5, lSh2. 

Transferred to Co. A, 23d P.V. 
Transferred to Co. R, 23d P.V. 
Killed at Fair Oaks, May 31, '62. 
Re-enlisted — trans, from Co. F, 
23d P. V.— killed at Cold 
Harbor, June 1, 1S64 — Yet. 
Drafted — deserted July 30, 1S64. 
Deserted July 30, 1864. 
Drafted — deserted May 9, 1864. 
Not on muster-out roll. 
Deserted, date unknown. 
Died June 15, 1S62, of wounds 
received at Fair Oaks, May 
31, 1862. 
Transferred to Co. R, 23d P.V. 
Trans, to 82d P. V., July 13, '65. 
Mustered out with Co., Sept. 

8, 1.S64. 
Wounded at Malvern Hill, July 

1, 1S62— trans, to 82d P. V. 
Drafted— trans, to S2d P. V. 
Re-enlisted — deserted Julv 21, 

1S64— Yet. 
I3eserted July 12, 1S63. 
1 (rafted — deserted May 9, 1864. 
Drafted — deserted Apr. 1, 1864. 
Drafted — deserted Aug. 16, '63. 
Mustered out with Co., Sept. 

8, 1864. 
Mustered out with Co., Sept. 

8, 1864. 
Deserted Oct. 17, 1S61. 
Transferred to S2d P. V. 
Mustered out with Co., Sept. 

8, 1864. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate, Nov. 10, 1862. 
Transferred to Co. M, 23d P. V. 
Wounded at Cold Harbor, June 

1, 1S64 — trans, to 82d P. V. 
Transferred to 82d P. V. 
Drafted— trans, to 82d P. V. 
Transferred to Co. K, 23d P.V. 
Drafted— killed at Cold Har- 
bor, June 1, 1S64. 
Missing at Fair Oaks. 
Mustered out with Co., Sept. 

8, 1864. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate, Nov. 4, 1S62. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate, Nov. 30, 1 86 1. 
Transferred to Co. H, 23d P.V. 
Transferred to Co. B, 23d PA*. 
Drafted— trans, to S2d P. V. 



246 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 




Date 

of Muster 

into Service 



Remarks 



McKim, Win. 
McKim, Chas. . 
McCleary. Win. 



McClune, Hugh . 
McChestney, Wm. 
Nail, John .... 
Nelson, Wm. . . . 
Ocschger, Gustav's 
O'Donnell.Thos. . 
Owens, Henry . . 
Priest, Charles . '. 

Powers, Richard 
Piatt, John T. 
Pierce, John . . . 



Pierson, Jos. . 
Ponimer, Adolph . 
Riley, Benj. F. . . 
Rod'gers, Reading 



Robinson, Ham'n. 
Simpson, Geo. L. 
Spear, David . . . 

Simon, Chris'n G. 

St. Clair, John . . 

Shultz, Henry . . 

Stanford, Jas. P. . 

Schreiner, John J. . 
Starsmore, Win. . 
Sherman, Franklin 
Sterling, Hugh . 
Simon, Jacob F. . 

Schmitz, Chas. . . 



Stull, Sidney B. 
Smith, Charles . . 
Sanderson, Wm. 
Stull, John . . . . 

Umstead, Thomas. 



Private 



Aug. 

Jan. 

Aug. 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
July 
I Aug. 

Sept. 
Sept. 
Aug. 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



Sept. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Feb. 



6, '61 

28, '62 
6, '61 



6, '61 
24, '61 
11, '63 
11, '63 

6, '61 
10, '63 

27, '63 
6, '61 

19, '61 

20, '61 

21, '62 



6, '61 
6, '61 
6, '61 
6, '61 



6, '61 
6. '61 
6, '61 



4, '61 

15, '61 

6, '61 

12, '61 

6, '61 
6, '61 
6, '61 
6, '61 
3, '64 



Aug. 6, '61 



Aug. 
Aug. 
July 
Aug. 



6, '61 

1, '63 
28, '63 
6, '61 



Aug. 6, '61 



Wd. at Cold Harbor, June 1/64 
—trans, to 82d P. Y.— Vet. 

Wounded at Cold Harbor June 
1, 1S64— trans, to 82d P. V. 

Died Oct. 6, 1864, of wounds 
received at Cold Harbor, 
June 1, 1864. 

Deserted Sept. 30, 1S63. 

Deserted April 28, 1863. 

Drafted— trans, to S2d P.V. 

Drafted — deserted May 9, 1864. 

Died Feb. 1, 1862. 

Drafted — deserted May 9, 1864. 

Drafted — deserted Aug. 24, '63. 

Mustered out with Co., Sept. 
8, 1S64. 

Transferred to Co. R, 23d P.V. 

Transferred to Co. R, 23d P.V. 

Wounded at Cold Harbor, June 
1, 1S64 — re-enlisted — trans. 
to82d P. V. — discharged July 
17, 1865— Vet. 

Deserted Sept. 10, 1862. 

Transferred to Co. H, 23d P.V. 

Transferred to Co. H, 23d P.V. 

Died Oct. 6, 1S62, of wounds 
received at Malvern Hill, July 
1, 1S62 ; buried in Military 
Asylum Cem., D. C. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Discharged April 1, 1862. 

Wounded at Gettysburg, July 
3, 1863— mustered out with 
Co., Sept. S, 1864. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate, Dec. 15, 1S62. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate, Jan. 9, 1S63. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate, Nov. 12, 1862. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate, June 22, 1S62. 

Discharged Aug. 8, 1S64. 

Transferred to Co. H, 23d P.V. 

Transferred to Vet. Res. Corps. 

Transferred to Co. 1, 82d P. V. 

Transferred to82d P. V.— killed 
at Sailor's Creek, Apr. 6, '65. 

Wounded at Malvern I [ill, July 
1. [862— killed at Cold Har- 
bor, June 1, 1864. 

Died April, 1862. 

Drafted — deserted Apr. 20, '64. 

Drafted — deserted Aug. 24, '63. 

Discharged 011 Surgeon's certi- 
ficate, 

Died July 2;,, 1862, of wounds 
1 revived al Pair ( inks. May 
31, 1862. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



L'47 



K \Nk 



Vaughn, Win. 
Van Fleet, Aaron. 

Williamson, Jos. M. 

Wagner. Win. H. 

Walters, Chas. P. 

Weir, Henry W. 
Watson, John 1 1. 

Wells. John M. . 

Wright, Chas. H 

Williamson, Alex 

West, John F. . 

Walker, Samuel T 
Walker, Jos. E. . 



OF Ml STEP. 

■ Se r\ ice ^ 



'rivate . Sept. 5, '61 3 I Hscharged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate, Dec. 10, 1862. 

Aug. 6, '61 3 Wounded at Fair Oaks, May 
31, 1S62— killed at Cold Har- 
bor, June i, 1864. 

Aug. 24, (11 3 Mustered out with Co., Sept. 
8, 1864. 

Feb. 6, '62 3 Discharged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate, Oct. 6, 1862. 

Aug. 30, '61 3 Transferred to U. S. Navy as 
Lieut. 

Sept. 10, '61 3 Transferred to Co. R, 23d P. V. 

Aug. 6, '61 3 Re-enlisted — wounded at Cold 
Harbor, June 1, 1S64 — trans. 
to 82d P. V.— Vet. 

Aug. 6, '61 3 Re-enlisted — transferred to 82d 
P. V— Vet. 

Aug. 6, '61 3 Re-enlisted— transferred to S2d 
P. V.— Vet. 

Feb. 26, '64 3 Killed at Cold Harbor, June i, 
1S64. 

Aug. 6, '61 3 Wounded at Cold Harbor, June 
1, 1S64 — absent at muster-out. 

Aug. 6, '61 , 3 J Not on muster-out roll. 

Aug. 6, '61 I 3 I Not on muster-out roll. 



\7yE have shared our blankets and tents together, 

We have marched and fought in all kinds of weather, 

And hungry and full we have been. 
We had days of battle and days of rest, 
But the memory that clings to us the best, 
We have drunk from the same 




Canteen. 



[Miles O'Reilley ) 



L'ts 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



COMPANIES 
L. O. P. R. 

Of the Twenty=third Pennsylvania. 

IN March, 1862, while laying at Camp Birney, under orders 
of the War Department reducing the infantry regiments 
to the maximum strength of 1000 men, these companies with 
Major George C. Spear as Lieutenant-Colonel were transferred 
from the Twenty-third Pennsylvania to the Sixty-first Penn- 
sylvania, Colonel Oliver H. 
Rippey, who was then in com- 
mand of six companies from 
Pittsburg and vicinity, thus 
raising it to the full maximum 
strength, Company L, Captain 
Butler Dilley, becoming Com- 
pany D; Company O, Cap- 
tain Robert L. Orr, that of H ; 
Company P, Captain John W. 
Crosby, that of G, and Com- 
pany R, Captain Geo. W. 
Mindil, that of I, so that they 
became part of that gallant 
righting regiment of the Sixth 
Corps, participating with it in 
all its campaigns and actions 
until the close of the war as follows : Yorktown, Williams- 
burg, Fair Oaks, Seven Pines, Malvern Hill, Chantilly, 
Antietam, Williamsport, Fredericksburg, Marye's Heights, 
Franklin Crossing, Gettysburg, Mine Run, Wilderness, May 
6th and 7th; Spottsylvania May iotli, 1 ith, I2thand t8th; Cold 
Harbor, Weldon Rail Road, Fort Stevens, Island Ford, Charles 
town, Apequan or Winchester, September 19, 1S64; Fisher 
Hill, Cedar Creek, Fort Fisher, (Petersburg), Petersburg as- 
sault, Sailor Creek. 

The casualties of the Sixty-first Pennsylvania were as 
follows : 

OFFICERS ENLISTED MEN TOTALS 

lS 214 232 




C( il. l,l-:i IRGE C". SPEAR, 

Killed at Marye's Heights while I olone] 

61st P.V. 



Killed or died d! wounds 

I )ied "i disease 

( Ither Causes 

Captured 

Wounded (including those who died 
of wounds 1 



214 
89 

94 



536 



PENNSYLVANIA V( ILUNTEEB INFANTRY. 



L'4!» 



Of this number these Companies lost the following : 



Killed or 

1 1 ol 

Wounds. 



Died of 
Disease. 



Wounded. 



Captured. 



Total. 





COMPANY D. 








Enlisted Men .... 


i 

22 


'3 


6 

3° 


2 


7 

67 



COMPANY H. 



Officers 
Enlisted Men. 



1 



3 
13 





COMPANY G. 








Officers 

Enlisted Men . 


J 2 1 - 1 
2 


6 1 


1 


4 
10 



COMPANY I. 



Officers . . . 
Enlisted Men 



1 
10 



2 
19 



Total 



3 
31 

. 161 



During the service these companies furnished three Col- 
onels, one Lieutenant-Colonel, two Majors to the Sixty-first. 
Colonel Geo. C. Spear killed at 
Marye's Heights, May 3, 1863, 
Colonel Jno. W. Crosby killed 
when the lines were taken at 
Petersburg, April 2, 1865, and 
Colonel Robert L. Orr who 
brought the regiment home, 
and Lieut-Colonel Charles S. 
Greene, two Majors, George 
W. Dawson and Oliver A. 
Parsons. George W. Wilson, 
Second- Lieutenant Company 
O to Adjutant, killed at Spott- 
sylvania, May 9, 1864. The fol- 
lowing enlisted men were pro- 
moted to Commissioned Offi- 
cers : Sergeant Sylvester D. 
Rhoads of Company L to Cap- 
tain Company D, First Sergeant Oliver A. Parsons, Company L 
to Major of the Regiment, Sergeant Charles M. Cyphers, Com- 
pany L to Captain Company F, Sergeant Win, Lathrop, Com- 




COL. JOHN W. CROSBY, 

Killed at Petersburg, April 2, 1S65 

while Colonel 61st P. V. 



250 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



pany L to First-Lieutenant Company D and Sergeant Sam'] 
C. Fell, Company L to Second-Lieutenant Company D, Ser- 
geant Charles F. Kennedy, Company O to Regimental Quart- 
ermaster, Sergeant Chas. H. Clausen, Company O to Captain 
Company A, Sergeant J no. W. Ryan, Company O to Second 
Lieutenant Company H, Corporal Jno. Barrett, Company O 
to Captain Company G, killed at Cedar Creek, October 19, 
1864, Private Geo. K. Lutz, Company O to First-Lieutenant 
Company G, Sergeant Charles H. Bewley, Company P to 
Captain Company G and Brevet-Major, Sergeant Abram Davis, 
Company P to Second Lieutenant Company G, Richard R. 
Lippincott, Company R to Second Lieutenant Company I, 
Samuel P. Stewart, Company R to Second Lieutenant Com- 
pany I, Captain Geo. W. Mindil, Company R was promoted 
to Colonel, 27th and 33d New Jersey Volunteers, Brevet- 
Major-General United States Army. 




GEi iRGl l'. in >WI 11., I Irummei Co II 13d I' V. 



PENNSYLA \M.\ VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 25] 



List of Those W^ho Died in Service. 

Company L 23rd. Company D 61st Pennsylvania. 

Captain I >. J. Taylor, killed at Cedar Creek, October 19, [864. 

First Sergeant Preserved Taylor, died June 1 1, 1S62. 

Sergeant Win. 0. Cole, died of wounds received May 12, 1864, 

at Spottsylvania Court House. 
Corporal Charles 11. Elliott, died June 17, 1862, of wounds received at 

Fair Oaks. May 31, 1862. 
Corporal Jos. C. Dale, died September 17, 1862, of wounds received 

at Fair Oaks, May 31, 1862. 
Corporal Geo. W. Fell, killed at Antietam, September 17, 1S62. 
Musician Jas. Munis, died March [9, 1862. 

Private Atherton Casey, killed at Marye's Heights, May 3, 1863. 
" Brooks, Win., died of wounds received June 29, 1864. 
" Baker, Isaac, died January 8, 1862. 
" Blackman, Frank, died November 23, 1861. 
" Benning, Edward, died December 28, 1863. 

Dilley, James W. , killed at Fair Oaks, May 31, 1862. 
" Ellis, Thos. C, killed at Spottsylvania C. H., May 12, 1S64. 
" Elson, Win. G. , died September 23, 1862. 
" Fulkerson, Chas. W. , died May 16, 1864, of wounds received 
at Spottsylvania Court House, May 12, 1864. 
Fairchilds, Jno. L., killed May 9. 1864, Spottsylvania Court 

House. 
Hav, Jno. W., died August 7, 1864, of wounds received at 

Fort Stevens, D. C. , July 12, 1864. 
Hour, Winfield, died December 2^,, 1862, of wounds received 
at Fredericksburg, December 13, 1862. 
" Hawk, Chester B. , died December 8, 1862, while a prisoner 

of war. 
" Moore, Hiram, died January 30, 1862, at Camp Graham. 

McFarland, Roderick, died of wounds received May 20, 1864. 
McDermott, Louis A., killed at Fair Oaks, May 31, 1862. 
" Pembridge, Jno., died April 8, 1862. 
" Piper, Jno., killed May 18, 1864, near Spottsylvania Court 

House, \*a. 
" Stout, Theo. L. , died December 23, 1S63, of wounds received 

at Marye's Heights, May 3, 1863. 
" Stroh, George, died at Richmond, Va., June 6, 1862, of 
wounds received at Fair Oaks, May 31, 1862. 



252 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 

Private Seiple, Frederick, killed in action near Charlestovvn, \'a., 

August 21, 1864. 
" Sayre, Vincent, died May 25, 1863. 
" Tanfield, Thos. O., killed at Spottsylvania Court House, 

May 12, 1864. 
" Tucker, Thos. O., died May 27, 1864, of wounds received at 

Spottsylvania Court House, May 12, 1864. 
" Wilcox, Crandall A., killed May 9, 1864, Spottsylvania Court 

House, Va. 
" Williams, Townsend, died December 19, 1861. 
" Ward, Wm. H., killed May 9, 1864, at Spottsylvania Court 

House, \'a. 



Company P 23rd. G 61st Pennsylvania. 

Captain jno. W. Crosby, killed at Petersburg, April 2, 1865. 

Jno. Barrett, killed at Cedar Creek, October, 19, 1864. 
Corporal Geo. W. Gordon, killed at Wilderness, May 6, 1864. 

" Jos. Walker, died date unknown. 
Private Peter Bradley, killed at Malvern Hill, July 1, 1862. 



Company O 23rd. H 61st Pennsylvania. 

First Lieutenant Geo. W. Wilson, killed at Spottsylvania Court House, 

May 9, 1864. 
Sergeant Thos. J. Perkins, killed at Wilderness, May 6, 1864. 
Corporal Jos. Holt, died November 1 1, [862. 
" Jos. L. Biddle, died January 28, [862. 
" Edmund Posey, died February 22, [862, 
Private Boyer, Henry, killed at Spottsylvania Court House, May 12, 
1864. 
" Bell, Thos. M., killed at Spottsylvania Court House, May 12, 

1 864. 
" Berk, Jacob H., killed at Wilderness, May 6, [864. 
" Bennett, Chas. F., died January 2, [862. 

Doals, Benj. I'., died I >eceniber 30, 1861. 
" Ginther, Gen., killed at Spottsylvania Court House, May 12, 
[864, while serving in Company A. 
Hessell, Jos., killed at Spottsylvania Court House, May 12, 

1864. 
fohnson, Thomas, killed al Malvern Hill, July 1, 1862. 
" Johnson, Henry, killed al Charlestown, Va., May 21, 1864. 

Moore, [no., 2nd, killed at Wilderness, May 6, 1864. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 253 



Private Mahoney, Wm. H.. killed at Wilderness, May 6, [864. 

" Murphy, [eremiah H., killed at Cedar Creek, October [9, 
1864. 
Met '.rath, Chas. B., killed at Spottsylvania Court Mouse. 

May 12, [864. 
McKinley, David, died August 7, 1862, of wounds received 

.it Malvern Hill, July 1, 1862. 
Vandever, Marshall, died December 26, 1861. 



Company R 23rd. Company I 61st. 

First Lieutenant Alfred Moylan, died July 8, [862, of wounds received 

at Fair Oaks. May 31, 1S62. 
Sergeant Wm. Lindsay, killed at Charlestown, \'a., August 21, 18(14. 
Corporal Harry Anthony, killed at Spottsylvania, May 12, 18(14. 

Robt. Cairstairs, killed at Fair Oaks, May 31, E862. 
Private FIdward Garvin, killed at Fort Stevens, July 12, 1864. 

C. L. Issamart, killed at Fair Oaks, May 31, 1862. 

Jos. Kline, killed at Fair Oaks, May 31, 1862. 

Jno. Lowe, died June 5, 1S62. 

[no. Mills, killed at Fair Oaks, May 31, 1862. 

Jas. McCallister, killed at Fair Oaks, May 31, 1S62. 

Rich'd Powers, killed at Fair Oaks, May 31, 1862. 

Nicholas B. Sands, died July 26, 1862. 

J. Weaver, killed at Wilderness. 




25 ! 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



COMPANY L, 23d-D, 61st. 

RECRUITED IN LUZERNE COUNTY 



N'ami 




Date 

of Muster 

into Servici 



Butler Dilley. . 
William W. Ellis 



I >.ivi<l J. Taylor. 



Oliver] A, Parsons 



Captain . 



Aug. iS, '61 
Aug. 1 8, '6i 



Aug. 18, '6i 



Aug. iS, '6i 



Sylv. D. Rhoades . 



Nov. 20, '6i 



Smith IV Dean 



Chas. M. Cyphers 



Wm. Lathrop 



Samuel C. Fell 



ist Lieut. 



2d Lieut. 



Aug. iS. '6 1 



Aug. iS, '6i 



Aug. iS, '6i 



Aug, [8, '6i 



Resigned July 23, 1862. 
Promoted from istLt. toCapt., 
July 23, 1862 — wounded at 
Marye's Heights, May 3, 1863 
— transferred to Yet. Res. 
Corps, Jan. 1, 1S64. 
Promoted from 2d to ist Lieut., 
July 23, 1S62 ; to Capt., Mar. 
25, 1864 — wounded at Fair 
Oaks, May 31, 1S62, and at 
Spottsylvania C. H., July 12, 
1S64 — killed at Cedar Creek, 
Va., Oct. 19, 1864— Yet. 
Promoted to ist Sgt., July 23, 
1862 ; to 2d Lieut., April 19, 
1864 , to ist Lieut., Oct. 1, 
1864 ; to Capt. , Nov. 30, 1S64 ; 
to Major by brev. for gallant 
and meritorious service in as- 
sault before Petersburg, \'a., 
April 2, 1865 ; to Major, May 
14, 1865 — wd. near Spottsyl- 
vania, May 18, 1864, and in 
charge at Petersburg, April 
2, 1865 — discharged June 2,8, 
1S65— Yet. 
Promoted from Sgt. to 2d I.t., 
Dec. 31, 1864 ; to ist Lt., Jan. 
6, 1.N65 : to Capt., June 3, 
'65 — awarded Congressional 
Medal of Honor for gallantry 
at Fisher's Hill, Ya., Sept. 
22, 1S64 — discharged with 
Co., June 28, 1865 — Yet. 
Promoted from ist Sgt. to 2d 
Lieut., July 23, iS6j; t • > lit 
Lieut., April 19, 1S64 — wd. at 
Spottsylvania C. II., May 12, 
1S64 — disch. Aug. 10, 1864. 
Promoted from ist Sgt. to 2d 
Lieut., Sept. 4, 1864 ; to ist 
Lieut., I >ec. i.s, 1N64 ; to 
Capt. Co. I'", June 6, 1865— 
wounded at ( >coquon Creek, 
Ya., Sept. 19, 1864 — disch. on 
Surg, certificate, Mav is, 1^65 
— Vet. 
Promoted from Sgt. Maj. to 2d 
Lieut., Jan. .N, 1X65 ; to ist 
Lieut., June 2, 1865 — mus. 
out with Co., lime 28, 1865 — 
Vet. 
Promoted from isi Sgt. to 2d 
Lieut., June <>, 1865 mus. cut 
with Co., fune 2S, '65— Vet. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



255 



i ' , , i 

oi Mi 

INTO Si 



Preserved Taylor . isl Sgt. 
Wm. 1). Beals 



Win. Coon . . . 
Win S. Withers 

Jacob Shafer . . 
Jas. R. Shultz. . 

Wm. A. Swan . 



Sergeant 



Aug. 
Augr. 



Aug. 

Nov. 

Aug. 
Aug. 



Wm. R. Cole . . . 


1 * 


\ug. 


i8, 


'6i 


Geo. W. Sayer . . 


Corporal. 


Aug. 


18, 


'6i 


James McCarty . . 




Aug. 


18, 


'6i 


Daniel Schlarbach 


■' 


Aug. 


1 8, 


'6i 


Jno. H. Benning . 


" 


Aug. 


18, 


'6i 



Ezra A. Caswell 



IS, '(,, 



IS, 'M 
I, '6i 

IS, '(.1 

is, '6 1 



Aug. i8, '6i 



Aug. is, '6i 



l< I M ^RKS 



Theo. A. Tucker . 


Aug. 


iS, '6i 


3 


Wm. H. Rountree 


Aug. 


iS, '6i 


3 


Chas. H. Elliott . 


Aug. 


iS, '6i 


3 


Joseph C. Dale . . 


Aug. 


iS, '6i 


3 


J. J. McDermott . 


Aug. 


iS, '6i 


3 


■Geo. W. Fell ... 


Aug. 


is, '6i 


3 


Michael Loban . . Musician 

John Glancy ... 

Atkins. Joseph . . Private . 


Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 


18, '6i 
iS, '6i 

iS, '6i 


3 
3 
3 



I |ied June n, 1S62. 

Mustered out with Co., June 28, 
1865 — Vet.— wd. at Marye's 
Heights, May 3, 1863. 

Absent wounded at muster-out 
of Co.— Vet. 

Promoted from Corp. to Sgt., 
June S, 1S65 — must, out with 
Co., June 28, 1865 — Yet. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks, Va. — 
discharged Sept. 7, 1S64. 

I Hscharged, dateunknown — re- 
enlisted March 8, 1864, and 
discharged May 15, 1865 — 
wounded at Fair Oaks, Va., 
May 31, 1862— Vet. 

Wounded May 10, 1S64, near 
Spottsylvania C.H. — desert'd 
from hospital and enlisted in 
U. S. Navy. 

Died of wounds at Alexandria, 
Va., May 29, 1864. 

Absent in hospital at muster out 
of Co., from wounds received 
May 5, 1864— Yet. 

Absent — wounded at muster 
out of Co. — Yet. 

Mustered out with Co. June 28, 
1S65 —Vet. 

Mustered out with Co. June 28, 
1865. — Yet. — Wounded at 
Spottsylvania Court House 
May 12, 1864. 

Mustered out Sept. 7, 1864, at 
expiration of term — wounded 
at Spottsylvania Court House 
May 12, 1S64. 

Wounded May 12, 1S64 — trans, 
to Yet. Res. Corps. Jan. 6, 
1865. 

Promoted to Sergt. July 23, 1S62 
— wounded at Fair Oaks, 
May 31, 1862 — disch. Dec. 9, 
iS62, on Surg. cert, of disab'y. 

Died June 17, '62, from wounds 
received at Fair Oaks, Va., 
May 31, 1862. 

Died September 17, 1862, from 
wounds received at Fair 
Oaks, Va., May 31, 1862. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks and 
taken prisoner May 31, 1862 
— discharged Dec. 9, 1862, on 
Surg, certificate of disability. 

Transferred to Co. E, April 10, 
1S62 — killed at Antietam, 
Sept. 17, 1S62. 

Deserted Nov. 12, 1S61. 

Deserted Dec. 11, 1862. 

Discharged Sept. 12, 1862. 



25t> 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



N ui 



Date 

of Muster 

into Service 



Abbott, A. M. . 
Atherton. Casey 
Briggs, Job . . 

Burk, James . . 
Barnes, Geo. P. 



Private 



Brooks, William 
Baker, Isaac . . . 
Barnett, Patrick. 
Brunier, Theo. 
Brisbing, Geo. H. 
Blackman, Frank . 
Benning, Edward . 

Cooper, Samuel . 



Conner, David C. . 

Connor, Thos. R. 

Dale, David W. . 
Daniels, Win. H. . 
Dolph, Samuel . 



Dale, Chas. \V. . 
Dorman, Toney 



Dilley, Jas. W. 

Ellis, Thos. C. . 

Elson, Win. i .. . 
Ellis, Elmer R. 
Fairchilds, Win. I 

Fulkeson, < . W. 



Aug. 18, '61 

Aug. [8, '6i 

Aug. iS, '61 

Aug. iS, '6i 

Aug. 18, '61 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Jan. 


is. 
18, 
[8, 
is. 
18, 
18, 
1, 


'61 
'61 
•61 
'61 
'61 
'61 
'62 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 


Aug. 


18, 


•61 


3 


Aug. 


18, 


'61 


3 


Aug. 


18, 


'61 


3 


Aug. 


18, 


'61 


3 


Aug. 


IS, 


'1,1 


3 


Aug. 


1 8, 


'61 


3 


Aug. 
Aug. 


18, 

IS, 


'61 

•(,1 


3 
3 


Aug. 


is. 


'61 


3 


Aug. 


18, 


•61 


3 


Aug. 
Marc 

Aug. 


IS, 

1 1, 
18, 


•1,1 
'61 


3 
3 


Aug. 


is, 


'61 


,"^ 



Discharged Dec. 9, 1862, on 
Surgeon's cert, of disability. 

Killed at Marye's Heights May 
3. t86 3 . 

Wounded May 6, 1864— must, 
out with Co. June 28, 1S65 — 
Vet. 

Mustered out with Co. June 28, 
1S65— Vet. 

Pro. to Serg. Co. F, Nov. [,'64; 
to 2d Lieut., April 6, 1865 ; 
to 1st Lieut., .May 16, 1 S65 — 
not mustered — mustered out 
with Co., 2d Lieut., June 2S, 
1865 — Yet. — wound, at Spott- 
sylvania Court House, May 
12, 1864. 

Died of wounds June 29, [864. 

Died Jan. 8, 1862. 

Deserted Feb. 1, 1862. 

Deserted Aug. 1, 1862. 

Deserted Aug. 15, 1S62. 

Died Nov. 23, 1S61. 

Died at Brandy Station Dec. 
2S, 1863. 

Disch. March 12, 1863 — re-en- 
listed March 5, 1864 — must, 
out June 28, 1865 — Yet. 

Promoted to Sgt., Sept., 1S61 ; 
to Drum Major, March 1, '62 
— discharged Sept. 7, 1864, at 
expiration of term. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks, Ma\ 
31, 1S62, and on May 9. C864 
— disch. Sept. 7, isi, t 

Discharged Sept. 7, 1864, al ex- 
piration of term. 

Transferred to Co. H, 1st Pa. 
Artillery, date unknown. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks, May 
31, [862 — disch. for wounds, 
Sept. iS, 1862. 

I ii-sei lid Ian 1 . 1 si,.\ 

Wounded at Fair Oaks, Miv 
31, [862— received furlough 

from hospital July ,s. [862, 

and enlisted in 5th (J. S. Ait. 
Killed al hair ( >aks, May 31, 

[862, 
Killed ai Spottsylvania Court 

1 louse, May 9, 1864. 
1 )ied Sept, 23, 1862. 
Discharged March 30, 1863, 

V 1 mnded at lair 1 i.iks Ma\ ;i , 

is6.» discharged Sept. ; '64 
ai expiration of term. 
1 )icd Max [6, [864, 11! wounds 
1 e< eived at Spottsylvania C. 
II. Ma\ 1 J, [864. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



IMami Rank 

Fairchilds, Jno. L. Pi i\ ate 
Goff, Ufred 
Howe, John . . 
I [iggs, Janus . . . 
Hawk, C. B. ... 



Hotchkiss, Jerem'h 
Hay, John W. . . 



I low e, Winfield. . 

Huff. Levi .... 
1 [ood, Frank . . . 

Hinkel, Win. . . . 
Lippencott, Wm. . 



La Han. Jas. . . 
Myers, Judson W. 

Minig, A. T. . . . 

Morton. Ira . . . . 
Mears, Jas. A. . . 



Moore, Hiram 
Munis, J. . . . 



McGuire, Rufus 



McKnight, Jas. . . 
McFarland, Rod'k 

McDermott, L. A. 
Minich, V. n. . . 



Newspigel, Jos. . . 
Peterbough, Alex. 







r 






X 






< 




I'M | 




I'l 


VI 




IN 1 


I 





Remarks 



Aug. 


18, 


Aug. 


18, 


Aug. 


18, 


Aug. 


t8, 


Aug. 


IS, 


Aug. 
Aug. 


[8, 
1 8, 



Aug. iS, 



Aug. 

Aug. 



iS, 



Aug. 18, 



.T.Llg. 

Aug. 


18, 


Aug. 


i8, 


Aug. 


18, 


Aug. 


IS. 


Aug. 


18, 


Aug. 


18, 


Aug. 


18, 


Sept. 


4, 


Aug. 


1 8, 


Aug. 


18, 


Aug. 


is, 


Aug. 


IS, 


Aug. 


1 8. 


Aug. 


1 8, 



'6i 


3 


'6l 


.i 


'6i 


3 


'6l 


3 


•6i 


3 


'hi 
•6i 


3 

3 


'6i 


3 


'6i 


3 


•6i 


3 


■6] 


3 


'6i 


3 


'6i 
'6i 


3 

3 


'6i 
'6i 
'6i 


3 
3 
3 


'6i 


3 


'6i 


3 


'6i 


3 


'6i 
'6i 


3 

3 


'6i 
'6i 


3 
3 


'6! 

'6i 


3 
3 



Killed May 9. 1S64, at Spottsyl- 

vania Court House. 
Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 

1S62 — disch. Aug. 10, 1S62. 
Absent wounded at muster-out 

of Co. -Vet. 
Discharged Sept 7, 1S64, at 

expiration of term. 
Taken prisoner at Fair Oaks, 

May 31, 1862, and died Dec. 

8, 1S62, from exposure while 

a prisoner. 
Discharged Nov. 16. 1S61. 
Died Aug. 7, 1864, from wds. 

received at Fort Stevens, D. 

('., July 12, 1864. 
Died Dec. 23, 1862, from wds. 

received at Fredericksburg, 

\'a., Dec. iS, 1862. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
1862 — disch. June 17, 1863. 

Taken prisoner at Fair Oaks, 
May 31, 1862 — deserted Feb. 
1 1, 1863. 

Disch. April 10, 1862 — re-en- 
listed May 4, 1864 — disch. on 
Surgeon's certificate of disa- 
bility May 15. 1S65 — Vet. 

Transferred to Co. A — must, 
out with Co., June 28, 1865 — 
Vet. 

Discharged Dec. 31, 1862. 

Mustered out with Co. June 2S, 
1S65— Yet. 

Discharged April 9, 1862. 

Discharged May 24. 1862. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
1S62 — disch. Sept. 6, 1862. 

Died Jan. 30, 1862, at Camp 
Graham. 

Died March 19, 1862 — buried in 
Military Asvlum Cemetery, 
D. C. 

Wounded at Marye's Heights 
May 3d, 1863 — disch. from 
hospital, date unknown. 

Deserted Feb. 11, 1863. 

Died May 20, 1S64, from 
wounds. 

Killed at Fair Oaks May 31, '62. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
1S62— mustered out with Co., 
June 28, 1865— Vet. 

Discharged Feb. 11, 1S63. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
1862; also taken prisoner — 
mustered out with Co., June 
28, iS6,s— Yet. 



25S 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIKI) REGIMENT 



Namk 




Date 

of Muster 

into sek\ [i i 



Philip, Wm. H. . I Private 



Pembridge, Jno. 
Peters, Oded . . 
Piter, Jno. . . . 



Ruger, Luther . . 

Sweeney, Jno. . . 
Shafer, Nathan . . 
Shiber, Jesse . . . 

Schlabach.Jon'th'n 
Schultz, Jos. R. . . 

Stout, Theo. L. 
Strop, George . 

Stovers, Chest' r B 
Seipel, Fred'k . 

Sanders, Jacob . 



Sayer, Vincent D 
Tanfeld, Thos. A 



Tribbie, Wm. V. 
Tucker, Thos. O. 

Willard, Jno. . . 
Wiley, John . . 



Wilcox, Geo. E 
Williams, Towns' d 
Wilcox, Crund'l A. 

Wilbert, John . . . 
Ward, Wm. H. . . 

Zaun, Charles . . 



Aug. 


18, '61 


3 


Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 


18, '61 
r8, '6i 
IS, '61 


3 
3 
3 


Sept. 


4. '61 


3 


Aug. 


18, '61 


3 


Sept. 


4, '61 


3 


Sept. 


4, '6i 


3 


Sept. 


4, '6i 


3 


Aug. 


18, '6i 


3 


Sept. 


4, '6i 


3 


Sept. 


4, '6i 


3 


Sept. 

Sept. 


4, '6i 
4, '6i 


3 

3 


Sept, 


4, '6i 


3 


Sept. 
Sept. 


4, '6i 
4, '6i 


3 
3 


Sept. 


4, '6i 


3 


Jan. 


i, '6i 


3 


Sept. 


4, '6i 


3 


Sept. 


4, '6i 


3 


Sept. 

Sept. 
Sept. 


4, '6i 
4. '6i 
4, '6i 


3 
3 

3 


Sept. 

Si pi 


4, '6i 
4, '6i 


3 
3 


Sept, 


4, '6i 


3 



Trans, to Co. F, Nov. i, 1S64, 
as Sergeant — promoted 1st 
S-t., April 6, 1865 ; to 2d I J., 
May 16, '65 — mus. out with Co. 
June 28, '65, as 1st Sgt — Yet. 

Died April 8, 1862. 

Discharged Dec. 4, 1S62. 

Killed May 18, 1*64, near 
Spottsylvania Court House. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
1862 — transferred to Veteran 
Reserve Corps Feb. 29, 1864. 

Mustered out with Co., June 28, 
1865— Vet. 

Discharged Sept. 7, 1864, at ex- 
piration of term. 

Wd. at Fair Oaks May 31, '62— 
disch. Sept. 28, '64 — re-enlist' d 
March 1, '65, in Co. C, ^rd Y. 
R.C.- disch. Feb. 28, 1866. 

Discharged Sept. 7, 1S64, at ex- 
piration of term. 

Wounded at FairOaks May 31, 
1862 — discli., date unknown 
— re-enlisted March s, 1S64 — 
discharged May 15, '65 — Yet. 

Wounded at Marye's Heights 
May 3, '63— died Dec. 23, '63. 

Died in Richmond, Va., June 6, 
1862, from wounds received 
at Fair Oaks.Va., May3i,'62. 

Trans, to Co. H, 1st Pa. Art. 

Killed in action near Charles- 
town, W. Y., Aug. 21, 1864. 

Wounded at FairOaks, May 31, 
1862 — disch. Sept. 7, 1S64, at 
expiration of term. 

Died May 25, 1863. 

Wounded and missing at Spott- 
sylvania, Va., May 12, 1864 — 
—killed. 

Mustered out Sept. 7, 1864, at 
expiration of term. 

Died May 27, 1864, from w'ds 
rec'd at Spottsylvania Court 
House May 12, [864. 

Mustered out with Co., June 28, 
1865— Vet. 

Wounded May 12, 1864— absent 
in hospital at expiration of 
term. 

Discharged June s. 1 s '' >. 

Dii d Dec. [9, 1861. 

Killed May <i, t864, at SpottSyl 

vania Court I louse. 
1 lescrted November 15, [861, 
Killed May 9, [864, al Spottsyl- 
vania Court House. 
Mustered out with Co., June 28, 
1865 -Vet. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



259 



COMPANY O-TRANSFERRED TO H. 61st. 

RECRUITED AT PHILADELPHIA 



\ Wll 



op Mi si i i 
in 1 1 » Service 



Robert L Orr . . Captain Sept. 2, '61 



(has. L. Greene . 1st Lieut. Sept. 2, '61 



Geo. W. Wilson 



Chas. 1 1. Clausen 



Sept. 2, '61 



Aug;. 21, '61 



John \V. Ryan . . zd Lieut. Sept. 2, 



61 



Jno. P. Miller. . . Sergeant. Aug. 21, '61 

Thos. J. Perkins . Aug. 21, '61 

( '.eo. R. Coleman . Aug. 21, '61 

Chas. F. Kennedy Aug. 21, '61 



James M. Craig . . Corp . . Aug. 21, '6i 



Trans, to Co. A — prom, to Maj. 
Dec. 18, '64 — wounded April 
2, 1865, at Petersburg, Va. — 
promoted to Lt. Col April 
iS, 1S65, to Col., May 14, 1865 
— mustered out with Reg. 
June 28, 1865. 

Promoted to Capt., Co. I, Oct. 
7, 1862— trans, to Co. C— 
promoted to Lt. Col. May 15, 
1865 — wound, at Winchester, 
Ya., Sept. 19, 1864 — mustered 
out with Regt. June 28, iS65. 

Promoted from 2d Lt. to 1st Lt. 
Oct. 7, 1862, to Adj. March 
11, 1863 — killed at Spottsyl- 
vania Court House May 9, '64. 

Promoted from 1st Serg. to 2d 
Lt. Oct. 7, 1862, to 1st Lt. 
Sept. 12, 1863 — trans, to Co. 
E— pro. to Capt. Co. E, Oct.i, 
1864 — wounded at Spottsyl- 
vania Court House May 12, 
1864 — disch. Feb. 10, 1865, for 
wounds received in action. 

Promoted from 1st Sgt., Oct. 7, 
'62, to 2d Lt. Sept. 12, 1863 — 
wounded at Spottsylvania 
Court House May 12, 1864 — 
mustered out Sept. 13, 1864, 
at expiration of term. 

Wounded at Spottsylvania C'rt 
House May 10, 1864 — mus. 
out Sept. 7, 1864, at expira- 
tion of term. 

Killed at Wilderness May 6, 
1S64— buried in Wilderness 
Burial Grounds. 

Trans, to Co. A — pro. to 1st Lt. 
Nov. 14, 1S64 — commissioned 
Capt. Dec. 1, 1864 — not mus. 
— mustered out March 14, '65 
—Vet. 

Pro. to Q. M. Sgt. June 20, '63, 
to 1st Lt. Oct. 1, '64, Co. C; to 
Q. M., Dec. i8,'64 — mus. out 
with Regt. June 28, '65 — Vet. 
— ap'nt'd Capt. A.O.M., U.S. 
Vols., March 1, '65 — not mus. 

Wd. at Spottsylvania C.H., May 
12, '64 — mus. out Sept. 7, '64, 
at expiration of term. 



L'oO 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



\ \ m i 




Date 

of Muster 

into Servk I 



Remarks 



Geo. Jardian . . . Corporal. 

James Robb . . 

Hugh Farley . . 

Jacob Miller . . 



Joseph Holt ... I 

Jos. L. Bicldle . . | 

Edward Posey . . 

W'm. W. Ketchum 

Samuel Driver . . ' Musician. 



Richard McCabe 

Abrahams, I. L. 
Ban, John P. . . 

Bell, William . . 

Bird, Henry C. . 

Brown, John . 

Boyer, Henry . 

Bizzey, James . . 
Branan, Silas J. . 

Bird, Alfred W. 

Bicking, Geo. W 
Bell, Thos. M. . 

Berk, Jacob H. . 
Barrett, John . 



Bennett, (lias. F. . 
Carrol, Edwin A. 

Clark. Jus. II. 



Christy. I [enry V 



Private 



Sept. 4, '61 3 Wounded at Spottsylvania C'rt 
House May 12, 1864 — absent 
in hos. at expiration of term. 
Sept. 4, '61 3 Prisoner from May 6, 1.S64, to 
Feb. 26, 1.865 — mustered out 
March 3. 1865. 
Sept. 4, '61 3 Wounded — absent in hospital at 

expiration of term. 
Sept. 4, '61 3 Discharged Nov. 11, 1862, for 
wounds received at Malvern 
Hill, Va., July 1, 1862. 
Sept. 4, '61 3 Died Nov. 11,1862. 
Sept. 4, '61 3 Died Jan. 2S, 1862. 
Sept. 4, '61 3 Died Feb. 22, 1862. 
Sept 4, '6t 3 Deserted Dec. 7, 1S62. 
Sept. 4, '61 3 Trans, to Co. A — promoted to 
Corporal — mus. out with Co. 
June 28, 1865.— Vet. 
Sept. 4, '61 , Trans, to Co. C, 23d Pa., Feb. 
28, 1862. 
I leserted Oct. 17, 1N64. 
Mustered out Sept. 7, 1S64, 

expiration of term. 
Mustered out Sept. 7, 1864, 

expiration of term. 
Wounded — absent in hospital 

at expiration of term. 
Mustered out Sept. 7, 1864, 

expiration of term. 
Killed at Spottsylvania Court 

House May 12, 1864 — Vet. 
Deserted Nov. 17, 1861. 
Transferred to Co. A — muster'd 
out with Co., June 28, 1865 — 
Yet. 
Sept. 4, '61 3 Discharged on Surg, certificate, 

March 24, 1S62. 
Sept. 4, '61 3 Deserted Feb. 5, 1862. 
Sept. 4, '61 3 Killed at Spottsylvania C. 11., 
12, 1864. 

in Wilderness. May 6, 
buried at l'hila., Pa. - 



Sept. 
Sept. 


4. 
4, 


'61 
'6i 


3 
3 


Aug. 


26, 


•61 


3 


Sept. 


4, 


'61 


3 


Sept. 


4, 


•61 


3 


Sept. 


4. 


'61 


3 


Sept. 
Aug. 


4, 
21, 


'61 

'61 


3 

3 



Sept. 
Sept. 



( lampbell, 1 hos. 


Sept. 4. <>i ; 


Carpenter, < 'has.( ■ 


Sept. 1, '6i ; 


Cavenaugh, M. J. . 


Sept. 4, '61 3 



May 

4, '61 3 Killed 

1 K64 ; 

V. 1. 
4, '61 3 Promoted to 2d Lieut. Co. G., 

April 22, [864 ; to 1st Lieut., 

Aug. s, [864 ; to C'apt., Sept. 

5, 1864 — killed at Cedar 

('reek. Va., Oct. 19, [864. 
Died Jan. 2, 1862. 
Mustered out Sept. 7, 1*64, at 

expiration of term of service. 
Transferred to Co. A — pro. to 

2d Lieut., April 19, '65— mus. 

out with Co., fune 28, [865 

Vet. 
Sept. 4, '61 3 Discharged on Surg, certificate, 

June (), [862. 
Deserted Sept. 7, 1861. 

I '' SI mil Sept. 7, l86l. 

Desei ted Sept,, 1861-. 



Sept 
Sept 



4, '61 3 
4. '61 3 



Aug. 21, '6r 3 < 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



261 



N\M 



Claney, John . 

Duddy, John M. 



Dalton, William 

Davis David 11. 



1 V>ak, James . . 

I >oak, Samuel . 
I lavis, Benj. F. . 

Folej , F. James 

Frowert, John P. 

Fenoquio, Peter 

Fisher, Win. H. 
Fitzinger, James 

1 ribson, F^d. H.. 
I linther, David . 
< i hither, Geo. . 



( iirardine, Alph. L. 
Glaze, John .... 
Harrison, Saul . . 
Hammond, Alex. 
Hooper, Harvey . 
Hessell, Jos. 
Hinkle, Robt. R. . 
Hurk-y, Redm'd . 
Hough, Geo. W. . 
Jones, Wm. T. . . 




Dati 

01 MUSTEF 
INTO Si RVH I 



Private 



Sept. 4, '6 
Sept. 4, '6 



Sept. .), '6 
Sept. 4, '6 



Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 

Aug. 26, '6 

Aug. 21, '6 



Aug. 21, '6 
Aug. 21, '6 

Aug. 21, '6 
Aug. 26/6 
Aug. 21, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 



3 



Transferred to Co. L, 23d P.V., 

Oct. 1, 1861. 
Wounded at Spottsylvania C. 

11., May 12, 1S64 — absent in 

hospital at expiration of term. 
Deserted Feb. 14, 1862. 
Transferred to Co. A — pro. to 

Corp. Co. F, Nov. 1, 1864 ; t<> 

Sgt., April 6, 1865— mustered 

out with Co., June 28, 1S65 — 

Vet. 
Discharged on Surg, certificate, 

June 6, 1863 
Died Dec. 30, 1861. 
I >isi barged on Surg, certificate, 

May 28, 1862. 
Wounded, with loss of arm — 

discharged Dec. 2, [864. 
Mustered out Aug. 29, 1864, at 

expiration of term. 
Transferred to Co. A — pro. to 

Corp., April 2, 1865— mus. 

out with Co., June 28, 1865— 

Vet. 
Discharged for wounds received 

at Cbancellorsville.May 3, '63. 
Discharged for wounds received 

in Wilderness, Va., May 6, 

1S64— Vet. 
Wounded and absent in hospi- 
tal at muster-out. 
Mustered out Sept. 7, 1S64, at 

expiration of term. 
Captured in Wilderness, Ya., 

May 6, 1864 — transferred to 

Co. A — killed at Spottsyl- 
vania Court House, May 12, 

1864. 
Discharged on Surg, certificate, 

March 25, 1862. 
Transferred to Co. F, 23d P.V., 

Oct. 1, 1861. 
Mustered out Sept. 7, 1864, at 

expiration of term. 
Discharged on Surg, certificate, 

Jan. 9, 1S63. 
Discharged on Surg, certificate, 

Sept. 6, 1862. 
Killed at Spottsylvania C. H., 

May 12, 64— Vet. 
Discharged on Surg, certificate, 

Jan. 7, 1863. 
Transferred to Co. R, 23d P. V., 

Oct. 1, 1861. 
Transferred to Co. R, 23d P.Y., 

Oct. 1, 1861. 
Mustered out Sept. 7, 1864, at 

expiration of term. 



262 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 










as 




< 


Date 




of Muster 


\ 


nto Service 


- 




-.{. 




il 




h 



Jones, Geo. W. . . 
Johnson, Tlios. . 

Johnson, Henry . . 

Kennedy, Edvv. F. 



Lindsay, Jos. A. 
Lynch, James. . 

Lutz, Geo. K. . 



Moore, John, ist 
Moore, John, 2nd 

Maloney, W. H. 

Murray, Michael. 
Mover, Albert . 
Murphy, Jere. H. 

McGeoy, Thos. J. 
McGrath, Chas. B 
McCaughey, Thos 
McKinley, David 

Neville, Wesley M 
Needles, Albert 
Neveille, Geo. P, 
Neville, Fred'k A 
Perkins, Wm. N. 
Pendergrast, Jas. 
Robb, William 
Ryan, Patrick 
Rii e, William . . 
Stinc, John . 



Private 



Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 



Sept. 4, '6 
Aug. 21, '6 

Aug. 21, '6 



Aug. 21, '6 
Aug. 21, '6 

Aug. 2i, '6 

Aug. 2i, '6 

Aug. 2i, '6 

Aug. 2i, '6 

Aug. 2i, '6 
Aug. 2i, '6 
Aug. 2i, '6 
Aug. 21, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. i , '6 
An-. 26, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 



Discharged Dec. 8, 1S62. 
Killed at Malvern Hill, \'a., 

July 1, 1S62. 
Killed at Charlestown, Va., 

May 21, 1864. 
Captured at Fairfax, Va., Sept. 

17, 1S63 ; in Andersonville 

Prison 13 months — trans to 

Co. A — discharged April 25, 

1S65, to date Dec. 21, 1864. 
Mustered out Sept. 7, 1S64. 
Transferred to Co. A — absent 

in arrest at muster-out — Yet. 
Trans, to Co. A — promoted to 

Q. M. Sgt., Sept. 4, 1864 ; to 

ist Lieut., Co. G, Dec. 22, 

1864 — mustered out with Co., 

June 28, 1865 — Yet. 
Deserted Nov. 26, 1861. 
Killed in Wilderness, Mav 6, 

1864— Vet. 
Killed in Wilderness, May 6, 

1864 Yet. 
1 Mscharged on Surg, certificate, 

March 5, 1863. 
Discharged on Surg, certificate, 

June 10, 1862. 
Promoted to Sgt. Major — killed 

at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 

1864 — Yet. 
Must, out Sept. 7/64, re-enlisted 

U.S.N. '64— disch. Dec. '65. 
Killed at Spottsylvania C. H., 

May 12, 18(14. 
Transferred to Co. I, 23d P.V., 

Feb. 28, 1S62. 
Died at Phila., Pa., Aug. 7, '62, 

of wounds received at Mal- 
vern Hill, Ya., July 1, 1862. 
Promoted to Hospital Steward, 

U. S. A. 
Discharged on Surg, certificate, 

Jan. 26, 1862. 
Transferred to Yet. Res. Corps, 

June 24, 18(13. 
Promoted to Hospital Steward, 

23d P. V., Sept. 25, r86i. 
Mustered out Sept. 7, 1864, at 

expiration of term. 
Discharged on Surg, certificate, 

Aug. hi, 1862. 
Mustered out Sept . 7, 1864, at 

expiration of term 
Mustered out Sept. 7, 1864, .it 

expiration of term. 

Transferred to ( 'o. R, 23d P.V., 

( let. I, [Mil. 

Wounded in action— mustered 
out Sept. 6, 1864, at expira- 
tion of term. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



263 







1 1 \ 1 1 






\ IM1 


Rank 


OF MUSTF.R 




Rkmarks 






INTO 


Service 


- 




Swain, Morris S. . Private . 


Aug. 


21, '6l 


3 


Mustered out Sept. 7, 1864, at 
expiration of term. 


Smith, Chas. W. . 


Aug. 


21, '6l 


3 


Mustered out Sept. 7, 1864, at 












expiration of term. 


Scott, Henry . . . 




Sept. 


4, '6i 


3 


1 (eserted ; returned ; disch. by 
sentence of Gen'l Court Mar- 
tial, Feb., 1864. 


Sewell, ( jeorge . . 




Aug. 


21, '6l 


3 


Transterred to Co. A — pro. to 
Corp. — wounded Aug. 19, '64 
absent at muster-out — Yet. 


Tilden, I toward P. 




Sept. 


4, '6l 


3 


Mustered out Sept. 7, 1864, at 
expiration of term. 


Taj lor, Win. K . . 




Sept. 


4, '6i 


3 


Promoted to Principal Musi- 
cian, June 20, 1863 — mustered 
out Sept. 7, 1S64, at expira- 
tion of term. 


Vandever, Marsh'l 


" 


Sept. 


4, '6i 


3 


Pied Dec. 26, 1861. 


Walls, Charles . . 




Sept. 


4, '6i 


3 


Wounded -absent in hospital 
at muster-out. 


Wlieelan, Thos. J. 




Sept. 


4, '6i 


3 


Discharged on Surg, certificate, 
Oct., 1862. 


Wilday, Edward . 


Sept. 


4, '6i 


3 


Discharged on Surg, certificate, 
Dec. 14, 1861. 


Wainwright, Wm. 


Sept. 


4, '6 1 


3 


Deserted July 27, 1864. 


Wi lodruff, Geo.W. 


Sept. 


4, '6i 


3 


I >ischarged on Surg, certificate, 
Jan. 28, 1863. 


Williamson, 11. B. 


1 ' 


Sept. 


1, '6l 


3 


Deserted March 13, 1862. 



COMPANY P, 23d-G, 61st. 

RECRUITED AT PHILADELPHIA 



John W. Crosby . Captain . Sept. 2, '61 



Win. M. Dawson 



Y. P. Donnelly 



Nov. 



Jno. Barrett. 



Chas. H. Bewlev 



'61 



Sept. 2, '61 



Sept. 4, '61 



Sept. 4, '61 



Promoted Major, April 22, '64 
— wounded at Fort Stevens, 
July 11, 1S64 — mustered out 
Dec. 15, 1S64 — re-commis- 
sioned Lieut. -Colonel, Feb. 
22, '65 — killed at Petersburg, 
April 2, 1865. 

Promoted from 2d to 1st Lieut., 
Dec. 8, 1S62 ; to Capt., April 
22, 1S64— discharged July 5, 
1S64, for wounds received at 
Wilderness, May 5, 1864. 

Promoted from 2d Lieut., April 
22, 1864, to 1st Lieut.; to 
Capt., July 6, 1S64 — wounded 
May 3, 1863, and May 12, '64 
— mustered out Sept. 7, 1864, 
at expiration of term. 

Promoted from 2d Lieut., April 
22, 1864, to 1st Lieut., Aug. 5, 
1S64 ; to Capt. Sept. ,s, 1864 
—killed at Cedar Creek, Oct. 
19, 1864. 

Promoted from 2d Lieut., Co. 
E, to Capt., Dec. 18, 1864 ; to 
Brevet-Major, April 2, 1865 — 
mustered out with Co., June 
28, iS65-Yet. 



264 



HISTORY OK THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 




Date 

OF Mrs I ER 
INTO SEKV1CK 



Betij. K. Haldeman ist. Lieut. 
Geo. K. Lutz . . . 



Abraham Davis 

Israel Highill . . 
]as. S. Everton . 
Wm. H. Cochran 
Jas. S. McEIroy . 
Wm. J. Duffy . . 
Geo. L. Setnian 
Samuel Clark . 
John McVay . . 



Chas. F. Miller . 
Wm. J. Nimon . 

Jno. Gevard . . 



David Williams . 
Edward O'Kane 
Jas. McCourt . . 
Geo. W. Gordon 



Geo. Mehaffy . 
Jas. Stine. . . 
Jos. Walker. . 
Jos. Weston . 

Jno. < ('Connor 
I [enry Howie. 

Win. Walt . . 
Armstrong, Wm 
Bradley, Patrick 

ILiMiiie, Jacob 
Bennett, I leni \ 
Blake, jno. 
Bi iii e, Michael 
Beath, Robt . 
Bradley, Peter 
Bastian, Jerome 
Harnett, Kolrt. . 



2d Lieut. 



ist Sergt. 



Sergeant. 



Corporal. 



Musician. 



Private 



Sept. 
Aug. 


2, 
21, 


'6i 
'6i 


1 
3 
3 


Aug. 


22, 


•6, 


3 


Sept. 


4. 


'6i 


3 


Sept. 


4, 


'6i 


3 


Sept. 


4. 


'6i 


3 


Aug. 


i, 


'6i 


3 


Aug. 


13. 


'6i 


3 


Sept. 


4. 


'6i 


3 


Sept. 


4, 


'6i 


3 


Aug. 


l, 


'6i 


3 


Sept. 
Sept. 


4. 
4, 


•6i 

'62 


3 
3 


Sept. 


4, 


'6i 


3 


Sept. 


4. 


'6i 


3 


Aug. 


4. 


'6i 


3 


Aug. 


13, 


'6i 


3 


Sept. 


4. 


'6i 


3 


Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 

Sept. 


4, 
4. 
4, 
4. 


'6i 
'6i 
'6i 
'6i 


3 
3 

3 


Sept. 

Sept. 


4. 
4, 


'6i 
'6l 


3 
3 


Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 


4. 
4. 
4, 


•<>i 
'6i 
'6i 


3 

3 
3 


Sepl. 
Sept. 
Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 
Sepl 
Sepl 
Sept, 


4, 
1. 
■1. 
4. 
4, 
4. 
4, 
4. 


'6i 
•6i 
'6i 
'6i 
V.i 
'6i 
'6i 
V.i 


3 
3 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Resigned Dec. 8, 1S62. 

Prom, from O. M. Sergt. to 1st 

Lieut., Dec. 22, 1864 — mus. 

out with Co., June 28, '65 — 

Vet. 
Prom, from Sergeant to 2d Lt., 

Dec. 22d, 1864 — mustered out 

with Co., June 28, '65 — Yet. 
Mustered out with Co., June 28, 

1865— Yet. 
Mustered out Sept. 7, 1864, at 

expiration of term. 
Mustered out with Co., June 28, 

1S65— Yet. 
Mustered out with Co.. June 

28, 1865— Yet. 
Mustered out Sept. 7, 1864, at 

expiration of term. 
Mustered out Sept. 7, 1864, at 

expiration of term. 
Mustered out Sept. 7, 1864, at 

expiration of term. 
Promoted to 2d Lieut., Co. E, 

Mar. 1, 1S65 — mustered out 

with Co., June 28, 1865 — Yet. 
Not on muster-out roll — Yet. 
Mustered out Sept. 7, 1S64, at 

expiration of term. 
Wound, at Spottsylvania Court 

House May 12, 1S64 — absent 

at expiration of term. 
Mustered out Sept. 7, 1S64, at 

expiration of term. 
Mustered out Sept. 7, 1864, at 

expiration of term. 
Mustered out Sept. 7, 1S64, at 

expiration of term. 
Killed at Wilderness May 6, '64 

— buried in Wilderness Burial 

Grounds. 
Deserted, date unknown. 
Not on muster-out roll. 
Died, date unknown. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate, date unknown. 
Not on muster-out roll. 
Mustered out Sept. 7, 1864, at 

expiration of term. 
Not on muster-out roll. 
Wounded at Malvern I [ill. 
Mustered out Sept. 7, 1864, at 

expiration of term. 
I le Med, date unknown. 
Not on muster-out roll. 
Not on muster-out roll. 
Not cm muster-out roll. 

I leserted, dale unknown. 

Killed at Malvern I [ill, 
Not on muster out roll. 
Not on muster out roll. 



PENNSYLVANIA VI (LUNTEER INFANTRY. 



266 



Caron, Louis F. 
Cooper, Wm. B. 
Cooper, I l.illas J 

Cummings, Jno.T 

Connelly, Francis 
Clinghasen, H. . 
Crowthers, Mat'w 
Dve, Thos. . . . 



I )unn, Wm. J. 

Donley, Jos. P. 



I )onahue, Hugh 
1 >onahue, Jas. . 
1 Hmlur, I )avid . 
Dyer, Louis. . . 

Duross, James . 

Eastwick, Theo. 



Evans, And. G. 
Fleming, Wm. J. 
Fallowfield, Chas 

i '.aul, Jas. . . . 

Genaire, Philip . 
Gorman, 1 >an'l W 
Hoyendogler, S. J 

1 larris, Robt. . . 
Harris, Jos. . . 
Jacobs, Herman 
Jones, Thomas . 
Kidders, O. C. . 
Lowther, Chas. . 



Lewis, Geo. \V. 



Layre, Henry . . . 

Litzenberger, Jos. 
Lefferty, James . . 
Lawson, Jno. . . . 
Mullen, Geo. . . . 



Moore, Edward 
Medill, Geo. . . 




Sept. 4, 6i 3 



Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 



Sept. 
Sept. 



4, '6i 
4, '6i 
4, '6i 
4, '6i 



4, '6i 
4, '6i 



Mustered out Sept. 7, 1864, at 
expiration of term. 

Mustered out Sept. 7, iS(..|, at 
expiration of term. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

1 )ischarged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate, date unknown. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Mustered out Sept. 7, [864, a) 
expiration of term. 

Mustered out Sept. 7, 1.S64, at 
expiration of term. 

Mustered out Sept. 7, 1N64, at 
expiration of term. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Deserted, date unknown. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate, date unknown. 

Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
1862 — not on muster-out roll. 

Wounded at Wilderness, \'a., 
May 8, 1S64 — absent at expi- 
ration of term. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Mustered out Sept. 7, 1864, at 
expiration of term. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Mustered out Sept. 7, 1864, at 
expiration of term. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Deserted, date unknown. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Wounded May 6, 1S64 — absent 
in hospital at expiration of 
term. 

Prisoner from May 8 to Dec. 13, 
1864 — mustered out Dec. 18, 
1864, at expiration of term. 

Mustered out Sept. 7, 1S64, at 
expiration of term. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Wd. at Spottsylvania Court 
House May 12, 1S64— absent 
at expiration of term. 

Mustered out Sept. 7, 1864, at 
expiration of term. 

Absent, sick, at expiration of 
term. 



266 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



Rank 









a 








< 


D 


\TK 




> 


OF M 


1JSTER 


| 


INTO 


SERVICE 


s 








1- 


Sept. 


4, 


'6i 


l 


Sept. 


4, 


'6l 


3 


Sept. 


4. 


'6i 


3 


Sept. 


4. 


'6i 


3 


Sept. 


4. 


'6i 


3 


Sept. 


4. 


'6l 


3 


Sept. 


4, 


'6i 


3 


Sept. 


4. 


'6i 


3 


Sept. 


4, 


'6l 


3 


Sept. 


4, 


'6i 


3 


Sept. 


4, 


'6i 


3 


Sept. 


4. 


'6i 


3 


Sept. 


4, 


'6i 


3 


Sept. 


4. 


'6i 


3 


Sept. 


4. 


'6i 


3 


Sept. 


4, 


•6i 


3 


Sept. 


4, 


'6i 


3 


Sept. 


4. 


'6i 


3 


Sept. 


4, 


'6i 


3 


Sept. 


4, 


'6l 


3 


Sept. 


4. 


'6l 


3 


Sept. 


4, 


'6i 


3 


Sept. 


4. 


'6t 


3 


Sept. 


4. 


'6-1 


3 


Sept. 


4. 


'6i 


i 


Sept. 


4, 


'6i 


3 


Sept. 


4, 


'6i 


3 


Sept. 


4, 


'6i 


3 


Sept. 


4. 


'6i 


3 



Mehaffy, Jno. . 
Miller, Herman . 
Myers, Dan'l . . 
Morrow, John . 
Maron, Win. . . 
McBride, Win. . 
McBride, Andrew 
McNannaman, P. 
McCarty, A. H. 

McMahon, E. F. 
McClintoch, Jos. 
NcNichoI, Jno. . 
O' Kane. Edward 
I >' Bryan, Jno. 
Pine, W. M. 
Reed, Henry . . 

Russell, Sam'l . 
Rementer, Jno. 
Sobbee, Walter . 

Sparks, Chas. . 

Showers, Michael 
Seiler, Aug. R. . 



Simpson. Sam'l G 
Smith, Ilenrv 
Watt, David P. 
Williams, Robt. 
Welsh, Jno. . 
Walker, Sam'l 
Wallace, John 



Private 



Not on muster-out roll. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Deserted, date unknown. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Deserted, date unknown. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate, date unknown. 

Deserted, date unknown. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Deserted, date unknown. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Mustered out Sept. 7, 1^64, at 
expiration of term. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Deserted, date unknown. 

Wounded, July 12, 1S64 — absent 
at expiration of term. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate, date unknown. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Trans, to Co. E from 2d Lt. Co. 
F, Jan. 8, '65, to 1st Lt. and 
Adj., Apr. 6, '65 — mus. out 
withRegt. Jan. 28, 1865 — Vet. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Deserted — date unknown. 

Deserted — date unknown. 

Not on muster-out rolls. 

Not on muster-out rolls. 

Deserted, date unknown. 

Re-enlisted — disch. June 28, '65 
— Yet. 





COMPANY R, 23d 


—I, 61st. 




KKCRUITED AT PHILADEI-PI 1 IA 


Geo. W. Mindil . 


Captain . 


Oct. 5, '6i 


1 


Resigned, Oct. 6, 1S62. 


Chas. S. Green . . 




Sept. 2, '6i 


3 


Promoted from ist Lieut., Co. 
1 1, to Capt, ( )ct. 7, 1862— 
transferred to Co. C — pro- 
moted Lieut. Colonel, May 
i.S, 1865 — wounded at Win- 
chester, Va., Sept. 19, [864 
mustered out with Regiment 
June 28, 1 Sfis. 


Alfred Moylan . . 


ist Lieut. 


Oct. 20, '6i 


3 


Died July 8, 1862, of wounds 
received in action. 


Wm. R. Jones . . 




Oct. 20, '6i 


3 


Promoted from 2d to ist Lieut., 
July 10, 1862 — resigned Dec. 
6, 1S62. 


R. R. 1 ,ippin< 1 -II 


* i 


Sept. 4, '6i 


3 


Promoted from Serg. Major to 
ist Lieut., Sept. 12, 1863— 
wounded at Spottsylvania 

Court House, May 10, 1864 — 

mustered out Sept. 3, 1864. at 
1 Kpiration of term. 



PENNSYL\ \MA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



267 







D 






\ mi 


Rank 


. IF M 


fSTER \ 


Remarks 






INTO £ 


ERVICE ^ 

X 


Samuel Long . . . 


2d Lient. 


Sept. 


4, '6i 


3 


Promoted from Sergeanti0 2d 










Lient., July io, 1.S62 — dis. 










June 8, 1863. 


Sam'l P. Stewart . 


(i 


Aug. 


22, 'dl 


3 


Promoted from Sergeant, Co. 
D, to 2d Lieut., Nov. 22, '63 
— wounded at Wilderness, '64 
— mustered out Sept 3, 1S64, 
at expiration of term. 


Win. A. 1 )avis . . 


1 st Sgt. . 


Sept. 


1.'"' 


.1 


Mustered out Sept 4, 1864, at 
expiration of term. 


Jos. C. Brown . . 


Sergeant. 


Sept. 


4, '6i 


3 


Not on muster-out roll- 


Edw. J. Grant . . 




Sept. 


4, '6i 


3 


Transferred Veteran Reserve 
Corps --date unknown. 


Wm. Lindsay . . . 


" 


Sept. 


4, '6i 


3 


Killed at Charlestown, Va., 
Aug. 21, 1S64. 


Henrj W. Wise . . 


i t 


Sept. 


4, '6i 


3 


Wounded at Fort Stevens, 
Washington, D. C, July 12, 
1N64 — mustered out Sept. 7, 
1864, at expiration of term. 


Thos. A. Hicks 


Corporal. 


Sept. 


4, '6i 


3 


Wounded at Fair Oaks, Va., 
May 31, 1862 — discharged 011 
Surgeon's certificate, date 
unknown. 


Harry Anthony . 




Sept. 


4, '6l 


3 


Killed at Spottsylvania Court 
House May 12, 1864. 


Robt. Caistairs . . 




Sept. 


4, '6i 


3 


Killed at Fair Oaks, Va., May 

31, 1862. 


Jas. McCrudden . 




Sept. 


4, '6i 


3 


Wounded at Winchester, Va., 
Sept. 19, 1864— not on muster- 
out roll — Yet. 


Win. Davis .... 


" 


Sept. 


4, '6i 


3 


Mustered out Sept. 7, 1864, at 
expiration of term. 


Win Matlack . . 


* I 


Sept. 


4, '6l 


3 


Wounded at Fair Oaks, Va., 
May 31, 1 S62 -discharged on 
Surg, certificate, date unk'n. 


S. B. Thompson . . 


'" 


Sept. 


4, '6l 


3 


Mustered out Sept. 7, 1864, at 
expiration of term. 


Attwood, Daniel . 


Private . 


Sept. 


4, '6l 


3 


Not on muster out roll. 


Albertson, Levi B. 




Sept. 


4, '6i 


3 


Discharged Nov. 17, 1862, on 
Surgeon's certificate for w'ds 
received. 


Beman, John M. . 


i > 


Sept. 


4. '6i 


3 


Transferred to Co. C. Sept. 4, 
1864 — discharged, date un- 
known, for wounds received 
at Fisher's Hill, Va., Sept. 
21, 1864. 


Bowman, Jos. . . 


" 


Sept. 


4, '6i 


3 


Deserted Dec. 12, 1863. 


Bellew, Jas. . . . 




Dec. 


I, '6i 


3 


I >ischarged for wounds received 
at Fair Oaks, May 31, 1862. 


Branson, Sam'l . . 


" 


Sept. 


4, '6i 


3 


Deserted Feb. 2, 1862. 


Caldwell, Geo. . . 




Sept. 


4, '6i 


3 


Wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 
1862 — discharged on Surg, 
certificate, Feb. 1S63. 


Cochran, W. Henry 




Dec. 


i, '6i 


3 


Wound, at Spottsylvania Court 
House May 12, 1S64 — trans, 
to Co. C, Sept. 4, '64 — pro. 
Sergeant Co. G, Nov. 1, 1864 
— mustered out with Co. June 
28, 1865.— Yet. 



268 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 




i >\ 1 1 

of Muster 

into Service 



Dick, Thos. B. . 

Deacon, Howard 

Disert, Jno. . . 
Dubois, Robt. S. 

Davis, Wm. . . 

Ennis, Isaac H. . 

Faust, Aug. . . 

Fisher, Jos. . . . 



Private 



Farril, Wm. . . 
Garvin, Geo. . . 



Garvin, Edw. . 
Hansell, Milton . 

Hayes, Thos. . 

Haffren Francis 

Highhill, Israel 



Hayes, Robt. E. 

Hurley, Redm'd 

Hamilton, Geo. 

Hull, Geo. W. . 
Issamart, C. L. . 



Jeffries, Jno. 
Jones, Win. 



Jones, Tobias . 

Kline, Jos. . . . 
Kline, Win. 
Kennedy, Michae 

Krep, Geo. . . . 

I ,\ 11' ll, I reo. . . 



Dec. i, '61 



Dec. i, '61 



Dec. 
Dec. 


i, '61 3 
I, '6i 3 


Dec. 


i, '6l 1 3 i 


Dec. 


I, '6i 3 


Dec. 


i, '6i 3 


Sept. 


4. '6l 3 


Dec. 


I, '6i 3 


Sept. 


4, '6i 3 


Dec. 

Sept. 


I, '6i ' 3 
4. '6i 3 


Sept. 


4, '6i 3 


Nov. 


27, '61 3 


Sept. 


4. '61 3 


Sept. 


4. '61 3 


i Sept. 


4, '61 3 


Sept. 


4. '''I 3 


Si-pi 
Sept. 


4, '<" 3 
4, '61 3 


Sept. 


4, '6' 3 


Sept. 


4, '61 3 


Sept. 
Sept. 

Sept, 
Sept, 


I, '6) 3 

4, '"' 3 
4, '61 3 
4, '61 3 


Vug, 
Nov, 


i,'6j 3 

23. '61 3 



Transferred to Co. C, Sept. 4, 
1864 — discharged on special 
order, April 6, 1865 — Yet. 

Discharged for wounds received 
at Fair Oaks.Va., May 31, '62. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Mustered out Sept. 7, 1864, at 
expiration of term. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate Nov. 21, 1862. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate, date unknown. 

Discharged from wounds re- 
ceived at Chancellorsville, 
May 3, 1S63. 

Transferred to Co. C, Sept. 4, 
1864— promoted Corp., Jan. 
5, 1S65 — wounded April 2, 
'65— disch. July 19/65 — Vet. 

Wounded at Chancellorsville, 
May 3, 1863 — deserted, date 
unknown. 

Transferred to Co. C, Sept. 4, 
1S64 — promoted to Sergeant 
Co. F, Nov. 1, '64 — mustered 
out with Co. June 28, 1865 
—Yet. 

Killed, July 12, 1864. 

Mustered out Sept. 7, 1864, at 
expiration of term. 

Mustered out Sept. 7, 1864, at 
expiration of term. 

Mustered out Sept. 7, 1864, at 
expiration of term. 

Transferred to Co. C, Sept. 4, 
1S64— promoted to 1st Serg., 
Co. G, Nov., 18S4 — mustered 
out with Co., June 28, 1865— 
Vet 

Discharged on Surgeon'scertifi- 
cate. Nov. 21, 1S61. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate March 16, 1862. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate Nov. 21, t86l. 

Deserted, < >ct 9, t86i. 

Killed at Fair Oaks, Va., May 

31, 1S62. 
I (ischarged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate, date unknown. 

Transferred to Co. C, Sept. 4, 
1864 — mustered out with ( 
June 28, [865 — Yet. 
Not on muster-out roll. 
Killed at Fair" »aks May 31/62. 
1 ii serted, date unknown. 
1 lisi harged for wounds received 
,(i Fail 1 laks, May 31, 1862 
I leserted Sept. J2, r862. 

Not on mustel 1 hi! roll. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, 



269 



N \\l I 




Lowe, Jno 1'rivate. 

Mahoney, 1 )ennis . 

Millet, Wm. ... 



Mills. Jno 

Maxwell, (.'has. . 

McGettigan, F. C. 

McCallister, Jas. . 

McCarter, Jno. . . 
McIIravey, And'w 

McNeight, Win. . 



Orton, Jas. F. . 

Powers, Richard 
Piatt, Jno. J. . . 

Pope, Harrison \\ 



Pigeon, Jas. . . 

Rice, Win. . . . 

Rice, Felix . . 

Riley, Benj. S. . 

Sands. X. B. . . 

Smith, Win. . 

Snowden, Jas. . 

Swain, Philip . . 

Taylor, Jos. . . 

Thompson. Jno. 

Willis. Fred'k . 

Wallace, Jas. . . 

White, Samuel . 

Weaver, J. . . . 



Dati 
into Si 



Sept. 4, '6 
Sept. 4. '6 

Sept. 4. '6 



Sept. 4. '6 

Sept. 4. '6 

Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. }, '6 

Sept. 4, 'ft 

Sept. 4, '6 



Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 

Dec. 7, '6 



York, James 



Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 

Sept. 4, '6 

Nov. 28, '61 



I )ied June 5, 1862. 

I lischarged tor wounds received 
at Fair ( )aks, May 31, 1862. 

Transferred to Co. C, Sept. 4. 
1*64 — mustered out with Co., 
June 28, 1865 — Yet. 

Filled at Fiir Oaks May 31, '62, 

I lischarged Oct. 25, 1861 — 
minor. 

Mustered out Sept. 7, 1864, at 
expiration of term. 

Died of wounds received at 
F"air Oaks .May 31, 1862. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

I lischarged for wounds received 
at Fair Oaks May 31, 1862. 

Transferred to Co. C, Sept. 4, 
1864— promoted 1st Sgt. May 
12, 1865— mustered out with 
Co., June 2S, 1865— Yet. 

Mustered out Sept. 7. 1864, at 
expiration of term. 

Killed at Fair Oaks May 31/62. 

I lischarged for wounds received 
at Fair Oaks May 31, 1862. 

Transferred to Co. C, Sept. 4. 
1*64 — mustered out with Co. 
June 28, 1865 — Yet. 

Deserted Nov. 24, 1864. 

Discharged, date unknown — 
minor. 

Discharged for wounds received 
at Fair Oaks .May 31, 1862. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate April 3, 1862. 

Died July 26, 1862— buried in 
Cypress Hill Cemetery, L. 1. 

Not on muster-out roll. 

Discharged of wounds received 
at Fair Oaks May 31, 1862. 

Mustered out Sept. 7, 1S64, at 
expiration of term. 

Transferred to Co. C, Sept. 4, 
1864 — prom. Sgt. May 18, '65 
— mustered out with Co. , June 
28, 1865— Yet. 

Wounded — transferred to Co. 
C, Sept. 4, 1S64 — discharged 
June 3. 1S65, for wounds re- 
ceived in action — Yet. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate, date unknown. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate, date unknown. 

Deserted, Oct. 5, 1861. 

Killed at Wilderness — buried in 
Wilderness Burial Grounds. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certi- 
ficate, date unknown. 



OFFICERS— SURVIVORS' ASSOCIATION. 
L903-1904. 




REV (AMES G SHINN, COL. JOHN 1 GLENN, WM II BANTOM, 

( haplain. Pn idem, rreasurer. 

CO! \\ I. WAL1 M I ■, I KM' P SIMON, 

\ ,, , Pn idcnl \ ii • President. 

rHOS. 1 CHADW1CK, WM. J WRAV, JOHN HENDERSON, 

r, , ording Sei n tai i Si i retarj Financial Sei retarj 



70 



PENNSYLVANI V VOl UNTEER INFANTRY. 271 



Survivors* Association 
Twenty-tHird Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry 

THE first meeting of the regiment after its muster out was 
at the call of the State of Pennsylvania for the turning over 
to the State of the battle Hags. It participated as an organiza- 
tion in the grand parade on that occasion, July 4th, 1866, this 
being one of the greatest days in the history of Philadelphia. 
The parade was through the principal streets thronged with 
people, the veterans being closed in mass in Independence 
Square and as each regiment was called by number, its colors, 
that had been presented by the State, were turned over to 
Governor Andrew Curtin to be deposited at the State Capitol. 
As an organization it attended the funeral ceremonies and 
acted as escort at the burial of Major-General George B. McClel- 
lan. and Major-General George G. Meade, late Commanders-in- 
Chief of the Army of the Potomac. It escorted at 7 o'clock in the 
morning the remains of its old colonel, General Thomas H. Neill, 
to Broad Street Station, en mute for burial at West Point. It 
contributed and participated as an organization at the dedica- 
tion of the monument to General John Sedgwick, at the Wil- 
derness, who was killed May 9, 1864, and to General H. G. 
\\ right at Arlington, its old Corps commanders, and the monu- 
ment to its Division Commander, General David A. Russell, at 
Winchester, who was killed leading the charge, September 19, 
1864. It attended the burial of its comrades within the citv 
limits and vicinity. With its membership and friends it raised 
the funds and erected a monument to the command at Gettys- 
burg, where the regiment was engaged on Julv 3, 1863. It 
was dedicated August 6, 1886. On this occasion three hundred 
and fifty survivors and ladies and friends participated. The Bat- 
tlefield Association at first refused their position at Gulp's Hill, 
claiming no record of the regiment or brigade being in that 
position, but suggested that they had the right to place the 
monument at the right and rear of Little Round Top, or 
to the left of Meade's headquarters on Taneytown Road to 
the rear of the left centre. While they were in both positions 
under fire, the only part of the field the regiment was engaged 
was at Culp's Hill. 

After building up a claim to this position, it was so strong 



1272 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 




that Colonel Batchelder, who had charge of the location of 
positions, went to Washington to hunt up General Shaler's re- 
port of the action. It could not be found in the Sixth Army 
Corps' reports, but in looking over the Twelfth Armv Corps' 

papers it was found, and with 
an apologetic letter from Bat- 
chelder, containing "the legend 
of the fight, extract from Gen- 
eral Shaler's, the brigade com- 
mander's report," the position 
at Gulp's Hill was granted. 
This omission on the part of 
the official reports of the Army 
of the Potomac General Shaler 
called attention to General 
Meade at an army reunion 
at Providence, R. I., in i860. 
Meade expressed his regrets 
and referred him to General 
Wheaton, then living, who 
commanded the Third Divi- 
sion, Sixth Corps, in which the Twenty-third was part at 
Gettysburg, but while Wheaton also regretted the omission and 
promised to have it rectified, up to that time it had not been 
done. 

When Pennsylvania appropriated $1500 to each of her 
commands that participated in the action at Gettysburg, for 
the purpose of the erection of a monument on that field, where 
they had been engaged, the Battlefield Commission suggested 
they have erected a monument to the right of Little Round Top 
or to the left of Meade's headquarters. As they had already 
placed a monument at Culp's Hill, where they had been 
engaged, they decided to further beautify it by the placing of a 
statue of a Birney Zouave on the shaft of the tablet. This the 
Commission consented to do and the monument was rededicated 
on tlic day of the dedication of Shaler's Brigade Monuments. 

It participated as an organization at the dedicatory cere- 
monies of Pennsylvania Monuments, Gettysburg, September 
12, 1889, for parade and review. On the occasion Colonel 
John I-'. Glenn was marshal of the Fifth Division, composed of 



WILLIAM FINLEY, 
Co. K. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 273 

infantry regiments engaged in the battle with the Sixth Corps, 
Lieutenant-Colonel William J. Wallace, commanding Twenty- 
third Pennsylvania Volunteers, and William Bartley " Com- 
pany A," was one of the special aides to the chief marshal. 

The organization has held 
monthly meetings each year 
until i 89O, since holding stated 
meetings quarterly. Nearly 
all its members belong to the 
Grand Army of the Repub- 
lic, Loyal Legion or Union 
Veteran Legion, participating 
with these societies in their 



Annual reunions have 
been held upon the anniver- 
sary of each of the actions the 
regiment participated in. 

The association is com- 
pose d of honorably dis- 
charged soldiers of the 




ol.lVKR T. ECKERT, 
Regimental Com.-Sergt. 



Twenty-third, Pennsylvania Volunteers, and honorably dis- 
charged soldiers and sailors who were transferred from the 
Twenty-third. 



Survivors' Association 

of THE 

TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT PENNSYLVANIA VOLS. 



Preamble. 
We, whose names are hereunto subscribed, being honorably dis- 
charged soldiers of the Twenty-third Regiment Pennsylvania Vols., 
for the purpose of fostering the ties of comradeship (cemented in the 
camp and field), by mingling together once a year around the camp- 
fire, do hereby organize the Survivors' Association of the Twenty-third 
Regiment Pennsylvania Vols., and adopt the following laws for its 
government. 

article 1. 

Section 1. The name and title of the Association shall be Survi- 
vors' Association of the Twenty-third Regiment Pennsylvania Vols. 



1174 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



Sec. 2. The stated meetings of the Association shall be held on 
the second Tuesday evening of February, May, August and Novem- 
ber. A stated meeting may also be held on the evening of the 
reunion. 

ARTICLE II. 

Section i. A person to be entitled to membership shall be an 
honorably discharged soldier of the Twenty-third Regiment Pennsyl- 
vania Yols. , or an honorably discharged sailor or soldier who has been 
transferred from the Twenty-third Regiment Pennsylvania Vols. 

Sec. 2. The title of an honorably discharged soldier or sailor is 
to be determined from the records of the Adjutant-General's office, 
U. S. A., or Navy Department. 

ARTICLE III. 

Section I. The officers shall consist of a President, two Vice- 
Presidents, a Recording Secretary, a Corresponding Secretary, a 

Financial Secretary, a Treasurer, a 
Chaplain and a Council of Admin- 
istration. 

Sec. 2. The Council of Admin- 
istration shall consist of twelve mem- 
bers — one from the field and staff, 
and eleven from the membership 
of the regiment. 

Sec. 3. The Council shall or- 
ganize immediately after their elec- 
tion and select the date of the an- 
nual meeting and reunion, which 
shall occur on the anniversary of 
one of the different engagements in 
which the Twenty-third Regiment 
Pennsylvania Yols. participated, 
and report the same to the meeting 
on the night of their election. 
Sec. 4. The Council shall find a room for the annual meetings, 
and arrange for a camp-fire on that occasion, and be empowered to 
raise funds to defray the expenses of the annual reunion. Any 
moneys remaining in their hands, after the payment of all bills, shall 
be turned over to their successors. 

Sec. 5. The nomination and election lor officers shall take place 
on the regular stated meeting night of November of each year. 

ARTICLE IV. 

Section 1. The President shall preside at all the meetings, pre- 
serve order and discipline, have control of the Association on all 
parades, and appoint aides. 




WM. I) SLOAN, 

Sergeant Co. I. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



Sec. 2. The Vice-Presidents shall perform the duties of the Presi- 
dent in his absence. 

Sec. 3. The Recording Secretary shall keep a correct roll of the 
membership, keep accurate records of the proceedings of all meetings, 
and have charge of the By-laws. 

Sec. 4. The Corresponding Secretary shall attend to all corres- 
pondence and notify the members of the meetings, when requested to 
do so by the Association. 

Sec. 5. The Financial Secretary shall keep a just and impartial 
account of all moneys received by him, pay the same over to the 
Treasurer, taking his receipt for the same. He shall also make a list 
of all the delinquents and report the same one month prior to the 
annual meeting in November, and 
he shall have charge of the seal of 
the Association. 

Sec. 6. The Treasurer shall 
keep an accurate account of all 
moneys received by him, pav no 
money without an order signed bv 
the President and attested bv the 
Secretary, keep his books ready for 
examination, and make an annual 
report to the Association of its finan- 
cial condition. 

ARTICLE V. 

Section 1. The President, at 
the annual meeting in December, 
shall appoint two tellers ( neither 
of whom shall be a candidate) to (ames Patterson, 

conduct the election of officers for Co A 

the ensuing year. The President shall be the judge of the election, 
and it shall require a majority of all the votes cast to constitute an 
election. 

Sec. 2. In case no candidate has a majority on the first ballot, the 
candidate having the lowest number of votes shall be dropped ; and 
so on at each succeeding ballot. 

ARTICLE VI. 

Section 1. The dues of the Association shall be one dollar per 
year, payable on or before the annual meeting in November, to defray 
the expenses of the Association. 

Sec. 2. Any member conducting himself in a manner unbecom- 
ing a gentleman and a soldier at the annual meeting, banquet, or on 
parade, may be expelled by a vote of the Association. 




276 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 

AK III LIC VII. 

Section i. Upon the death of a member, it shall be the duty of 
the Corresponding Secretary to notify the members of the Association 
of the time and place of the funeral through the mails. 

Sec. 2. It is expected of all comrades to attend the funeral of a 
deceased member, and that the badge of the Association be worn. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

Section i. No alterations or amendments to these By-laws shall 
be considered without a notification to each member, of the proposed 
change, at least one month before being acted upon. 

Sec. 2. No portion of these By-laws shall be stricken out unless 
by a two-thirds' vote of the members present. 

I'h'- following are the officers for the year 1903-1904. 

Preside?it, 
Colonel John F. Glenn. 

/ 'ice- Presidents, 

Colonel Wm. J. Wallace, 

F"red P. Simon. 

Corresponding Secretary, 
William J. Wray. 

Recording Secretary, 
Thomas J. Chadwick. 

Financial Secretary, 
John Henderson'. 

Treasurer, 

William II. Bantom. 

Chaplain , 
Rev. James G. Shinn. 

Council 0/ Administration, 
James McGinnis, Robert Newberg, 

Daniel Grabber, John Rumney, 

Gotleib Staiger, Charles F. Huber, 

William F. Farran, John S. Linton, 

JOSEI'll McKlNNEY, I'l ' STEMGLE, 

I ,1 ORGE I''. PEIFER, Rll HARD J. Mill I R, 

We insert a brief (if several of the reunions that were 
held in celebration. 



O >UNCIL I >]■ ADMINISl RATH >N. 
1903 1904. 




■rtP 




«#>, w 



f 1 



««# 



I 




WILLIAM J. FARRAN. 
PHILIP STENGLE. 
JOSEPH McKlNNEY. 
JOHN S. LINTON. 



GEI IRGE I PEIFI I: 
ROBER I C. NEWBERG 
CHARLES F. Ill 1:1 R 
JOHN RUMNEY. 



JAMES McGINNIS. 
DANIEL GRAEBER. 
RICHARD J. Mil I I R 
GOTLEIB STAIGER. 



L'7s HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



Reunion — Fair OaKs 

This reunion was held at Mannerchor Hall, Philadelphia, 
Pa., May 31, 1882. General Thos. H. Neill, then in command 
of the U. S. Army Post, at Jeffersonville, Missouri, came on to 
preside. His presence was one of unusual greetings, as it was 
the first time they had met since the close of the war. 

The following toasts were read : 

"The Day We Celebrate." 

The fields now waving' with grain, twenty years ago to- 
day, were covered with the slain. 

Responded to by General Thos. H. Neill. 

"The Union Volunteer." 

A creation in time of war. 

The bone and sinew of the country in time of peace. 

Responded to by General Alex. Shaler, of New York. 

"Oi'R Fallen Comrades." 

May we so guide our remaining march through life as to 
join them at the final review. 

"To Major General David B. Birney." 

Once our beloved Colonel whose memory we shall 
alwavs cherish. 

During the reading of these two toasts the comrades 
remained standing. 

"The Third Battalion." 

( )nce the left wing of the Twenty-third. Sad was the part- 
ing. In the language of to-day, it was a cold day for us all when 
they left. How glad we are to have them with us. May we 
continue re-united. 

Responded to by Brevet Major General George W. 
Mindil. 

"The Sixty-first Pennsylvania Volunteers." 

Half of whom were once part of us. We feel proud of 
the part they look in making the brilliant record of that 
gallant regiment. 

Responded to by Lieutenant John W. Ryan. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 279 



"To Our New York Comrades." 

We send hearty greeting to the survivors of the First 
Long Island — the Chasseurs — and One Hundred and Twenty- 
second New York. May the bonds of fraternity, cemented 
while brigaded, never break asunder. 

Responded to by cheers upon cheers. 

"Company Q." 

Known in all commands, but not honored either by the 

paymaster « >r sutler. 

Responded to by Johnnie Conigan, Company " F." 

The oration was delivered by Rev. James G. Shinn, the 

chaplain of the regiment. The paper was a masterpiece, being 

a most exhaustive review of the battle. 

"The Reunion of Cold Harbor" 
w;is celebrated by an excursion to Atlantic City by the sur- 
vivors and their families with a banquet at one of the hotels, at 
which impromptu speeches were made by Colonel Glenn, 
Chaplain Shinn, Dr. Roller, Colonel Wallace and others, with 
songs and music. This, with salt water bathing, and the 
many other pleasures to be had at this popular seaside resort, 
made the celebration a most enjoyable one. 

"The Reunion of Marye's Heights" 
was held at Belmont Mansion, F"airmount Park, Philadelphia, 
Pa., the survivors, with their ladies and friends, going to the 
celebration in omnibusses. A valuable paper was read upon 
the action by our beloved chaplain, with one of General 
Shaler's speeches which we insert in the historv. Among the 
toasts was that to the 

" Light Division," 
the Sixty-first Pennsylvania, Sixth Maine, Fifth Wisconsin, 
Forty-third New York, and Harns' Light Battery, the boys 
that wore the green cross of the Sixth Corps, and was responded 
to by Captain Chas. F. Kennedy, of the Sixty-first Penn- 
svlvania, as follows : 

The historv of the "Light Division", although brief, will 
occupy a page on the annals of the war brilliant with heroic 
deeds performed during the short but memorable campaign of 



280 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 




April and May, '63. Its organization dates from February 3, 
of that year, and was originally intended to have been com- 
posed of two Pennsylvania regiments, the Twenty-third and 
Sixty-first, two New York regiments and one each from Maine 

and Wisconsin, but for some 
reasons the Twenty-third was 
assigned to other duty and 
" the Light Division organized — 

^^ ^ Sixth Maine, Fifth Wisconsin, 

y~^ -^ H. Thirty-first and Forty-third 

New York, Sixty-first Pennsyl- 
vania and Harns' Light Battery 
of New York, the whole com- 
manded by General Piatt of New 
York. During the preparation 
for the spring campaign no un- 
usual event marked the history 
of the Division, snugly quar- 
tered near Belle Plains Land- 
ing, well fed and clothed (for 
Hooker was an excellent quar- 
termaster), no picket duty to 
perform and a well supplied sutler's tent. The boys led 
an easy life of it. On the 27th of April with the gen- 
eral orders to move, we broke camp and left with no little 
regret at the parting, marching to the banks of the Rappa- 
hannock near Franklin's Crossing. Our first light duty began 
with the carrying of pontoons, but inspired by the order of 
General Hooker "that we were now in a position to force Lee 
to fight on ground ol our own selection or ingloriously tlee to 
Richmond" we worked with a vim in the darkness 11] mid- 
night 

A successful landing having been made, the Light Divis- 
ion advanced on Saturday, May 2nd, and after considerable 
skirmishing captured the Bowling Green Road in rear and 
southeast of the eitv of Fredericksburg. During the night 
Sedgwick was busily engaged in disposing his Corps for an 
attack in the morning along the heights made red with the 
blo.nl oi many brave fellows wlto went down in the terrible 
assaults made tinder the gallanl Burnside. Looking back to 
the dreadful slaughter ol December 13th, 1862, it was not sur- 



JAMES BROW v 
1 lorporal Co. E. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



281 



prising 1 that the laces oi <>ur men blanched as they scanned 
the enemy's strengthened position Frowning with guns and 
glistening with bayonets, grand to look upon but terrible to 
encounter. During the morning the Light Division was dis- 
persed over various portions of the line, preparatory to storm- 
ing the heights with the bayonet. 

To Pennsylvania tell the lot of storming Marye's Heights. 
The Sixty-first and Eighty-second Pennsylvania were selected 
as the "Forlorn Hope." Have you in your army experience 
ever been placed in a position in the front, when you knew 
the danger you were about to encounter, not the rush at 
double quick into line, not the sudden charge with the veil and 
hurrah of the exciting moment, but to coolly stand by and 
know that you have been ordered to charge into the jaws of 
death, to know that you have been ordered to go with the 
almost certain knowledge that you are to be sacrificed for the 
vieti try. Then and there is the time to test the courage of men. 

And there on that bright sunny Sabbath morning dawn, 
up in the streets of Fredericks- 
burg stood two regiments strip- 
ped for the battle — awaiting as 
a sense of relief the order to 
charge at precisely a quarter 
of eleven by the clock in the 
church spire. 

The column moved out on 
the road and in column of 
fours, the Sixty-first in the ad- 
vance and left in trout followed 
by the Eighty second, right in 
front, taking up the double 
quick, soon quickening to a run, 
and with a yell as if in defi- 
ance of the enemy's strength 

*> JAMES GIBSON, JOHN McCLUNG, 

went down acrOSS the bridge Co. E. That suit of Blue and Zouave. 

and up the heights until close enough to hear their voices as 
they seemed to laugh in mockery of our danger. Suddenly as 
if the gates of hell had opened, belched forth the fire of the 
enemy, artillery and infantry pouring down the narrow road- 
way, canister and bullets rattling like hail, and dealing death 
and making ghastly wounds. Can we stand this rain of fire, 




I'M' 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



or shall we go back or upward as if hoping for safety under 
the frowning wall? We continued until the line, stunned and 
bleeding, halted, but for an instant as if to catch renewed 
courage and avenge the death of those who fell ; up, up they 
go, and the ringing cheers signalled the victory of the capture 

of Marye's Heights. Our losses were 
heavy. Spear, the brave, the cool and 
the gallant soldier fell bullet pierced 
and died without a struggle. There 
were many incidents of manly courage 
and bravery. It must not be thought 
that this charge was all that was re- 
quired to carry the Heights of Fred- 
ericksburg. Simultaneously all along 
the line moved regiments and brig- 
ades in charging column and victory 
crowned Sedgwick's efforts. Onward 
to the second range of hills the enemy 
were driven and on to Salem Church, where, on Monday, the 
enemy re-enforced, attempted to gobble the Sixth Corps. You 
well remember the close of Monday, May 5th, how, almost sur- 
rounded by the enemy, the Sixth Corps having performed its 
share of the fight, without blunder or defeat, re-crossed the Rap- 
pahannock at Bank's Ford, not crestfallen, its plume as white 
as the morning of the battle, but disheartened because that for 
all this sacrifice nothing had been gained. 

Thus ended one of the best planned campaigns of the 
war. Never was an army so well prepared for victory, never 
was an army so disappointed at defeat. Here it was illus- 
trated that man proposes but God disposes. With the return 
of the army came the disbandment of the Light Division and 
we that had the honor feel proud to have worn the ( ireen Cross 
of the Light Division, Sixth Corps. 




IESS1 R. B ROE, 
Co G. 



At the reunion in celebration of "Malvern Hill," among 
the many toasts were : 



"C< urn's Division." 

As part of that old command we congratulate its survivors 
who gallantly held the left centre at Malvern — repulsing Ma- 
gruder's desperate charging columns. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



283 



"Abercrombie's Brigade." 

We touch elbows with the survivors of the Sixty-first and 
Eighty-second Pennsylvania, First Long Island and New 
York Chasseurs and recount with pride the gallant record they 
made while brigaded. 

"Malvern Hill." 

The last of the Seven Days' fight, a crowning victory of 
the memorable change of base, was responded to by General 
George W. Mindil as follows: 

"Mr. President and Comrades: What shall 1 say in reply 
to the sentiment of this toast? You have already listened to 
an accurate description of the battle and to a very interesting 
account of your regiment's participation therein — no words 
of mine can add to your Chaplain's picture of the action, nor 
could I as strikingly and eloquently give voice to the heroic 
deeds of your gallant regiment on that memorable day. 

The seven days of hard and ceaseless fighting, each day 
ending in a night of continuous marching over rough, narrow 
and treacherous roads, through almost impassable swamps 
the roads encumbered with lug- 
gage and artillery, withdrawing 
silently, compactly, resolutely 
and defiantly from close prox- 
imity to an alert and enterpris- 
ing enemy, flushed with success 
and eager for your capture or 
destruction, furnishes the best 
evidence of the indomitable 
spirit and soldierly worth of the 
grand old Army of the Poto- 
mac, the Potomac Army of 
1862, with which we were proud 
to be enrolled. 

That week of battles by dav 
and marches by night was won 
by the matchless pluck and 
braver}-, by the staying qualities of the rank and file of that 
brave army. 

Malvern Hill, like Antietam and Gettysburg, like the 
Wilderness and the series of battles immediately preceding 




G. A. POMMER, 

1st Sergt. Co. H. 



28 4 



HISTORY OF THE TWEN TV-THIRD REGIMENT 




the fall of Atlanta was won not by strategy or tactics ; not by 
general directions or officers' command, but by the righting 
qualities of the private soldiers. 

In spite of incompetent leadership in the face of dire dis- 
appointment, consequent upon a failure to capture that which 

was already within grasp — in 
spite of the efforts and the 
losses, at Meehanicsville, at 
Gaines' Mills, at Savages, at 
the Orchards, in the White Oak 
Swamp, at Glendale, and at 
Charles' City Cross Roads, this 
gallant army of veteran sol- 
diers, was in its might, on the 
first day of July, and on the 
slope of Malvern Hill, inflicted 
upon a victorious and exultant 
enemy, upon rebel forces who 
charged their position with the 
fury of demons — a defeat, so 
bloody and so complete that 
had the commanding general 
been imbued with but an iota of the pluck and spirit of his 
soldiery, the memorable but forced change of base would have 
carried you along with the army over all opposition into the 
possession of the rebel capital. 

I was then serving upon the staff of the Marshal Ney of 
vour armv and I recall to-night most vividly a scene on Mal- 
vern's sanguinary field, just after the rebel legions had been 
hurled to destruction, when an aide from the commanding 
general delivered to my chief the order for retreat. Raising 
himself to his full height in the stirrups, his proud martial fig- 
ure revealing the beau ideal of a soldier, his courage on for- 
eign fields honored by the Cross of the Legion of Honor, upon 
his breast, and attested by the empty sleeve dangling by his 
side, his splendid soldiership, exalted bravery and unvaried 
success in the recent battles, the theme of every soldier in the 
armv, his face crimson with anger as well as the excitement 
for battle, his eagle eye Hashing contempt lor the order, he 
said slowly, but distinctly so that all within hearing might 
hear, '1, Philip Kearnv, an old soldier, enter mv solemn pro- 



GEI IKC.E E. WEBB, 
Sergeant Co. K. 



I'K.WM l.\ ANIA volunteer infantry. 



285 



test against this order, which can only be prompted by cow- 
ardice or treason ; instead of retreating we should be advanc- 
ing for the rebel army and the rebel capital are at our feet.' 

Malvern Hill was won, the victory was ours but as at An- 
tietam and at Gettysburg the 
fruits of the success were not 
gathered. 

An unmolested retreat was 
assured, a new and impregnable 
base of supplies was secured and 
then after the army had united 
and had been reinforced and 
strengthened and was about to 
begin its new advance upon 
the rebel capital with even- 
prospect of speedy success, an 
unaccountable order changing 
the direction of its march back- 
wards, the Peninsula was aban- 
doned and all the heroism, all 
the losses, all the sufferings of 
that Grand Army of the Potomac was brought to naught 
by its transfer back to the river of its name there to begin 
anew within sight of the nation's capital, a campaign or 
series of campaigns which after two years of most terrific 
fighting brought it back again very near to the spot where it 
won the crowning victory of the Seven Days' fight." 




WM. THOMAS, 
Drummer, Co. C. 





MONUMENT TWENTY-THIRD PA. VOLS., GETTYSBURG. 



286 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 287 



Dedication of Monument at Gettysburg 

The survivors with their friends took ;i special train at 
Broad Street Station, August, [886, to attend the dedication 
of the Twenty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers' tablet at Gettys- 
burg. 

Headquarters was at the McClellan House. The party, 
numbering 350, held a camp-fire at the Court House, pre- 
sided over by Colonel Glenn and the next morning marched 
to Gulp's Hill, where the monument was dedicated. 

The following was the address of the President, Colonel 
]ohn F. < ilenn : 

"Survivors of the Twenty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers 
and friends : 

We have met to-day to dedicate a monument to the 
Twenty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers. While we have the 
right to place a tablet at the rit^ht and rear of Little Round 
Top and to the left of Meade's Headquarters in the rear of 
left centre, it was here at Culp's Hill where we were engaged 
and it is fitting that we should place our tablet on this spot 
where our casualties were the greatest in this battle. 

Our friends have been legion not only in contributions 
but by their presence on this occasion and we most sincerely 
thank them. 

Gettysburg is destined to be the Mecca for all Americans 
and you have in this day's work contributed to the preservation 
of this field as well as by inscription on this monument, in a 
concise way, proclaimed the record of the Twenty-third. Gen- 
eral Shaler has expressed the wish that the old brigade be 
organized so that their monuments may be placed on Culp's 
Hill and our organization will assure him that we shall render 
all assistance to bring the matter to a successful conclusion. 

As President of your organization I greet and con- 
gratulate you one and all, and will now introduce the sec- 
retary, who will present the tablet to the Battlefield Asso- 
ciation." 

After music by the band the tablet was unveiled. The sec- 
retary was then introduced who delivered the dedication 
address in turning the monument over to the Battlefield 
Association. 



288 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 




Secretary William J Wray then delivered the following- 
address : 
Friends and Survivors of the Twenty-third Pennsylva?iia 1 'olunteers: 

We have assembled here upon this historic field, to dedicate this 
massive granite work of art, as a tablet, marking the position held by 

the Twenty-third Pennsylvania dur- 
ing part of the third day of the 
battle. Proudly we find you have 
wisely inscribed upon its sides not 
only the legend of its part borne in 
the action, but a concise history of 
the old command. 

As we read of its muster-in and 
muster-out, how our memories go 
back to the good-byes and God- 
speed greetings from our relatives 
and friends who came to see us off to 
the war and as we returned, to be 
welcomed by the Henry Guards and 
the fourteen companies of the old 
Vi ilunteer Fire Department, of Phil- 
adelphia, with its thousands of citi- 
zens to greet you as you passed 
through its streets; by the kind 
women of Philadelphia in a collation at the Cooper's shop, and reception 
and parade. Looking down the long list of battles you have passed 
through, we recall the marches and horrors of war, which reminds us 
that all did not return, and as we read the review of the action on the 
third base and front of the tablet, we recall one of the grandest marches 
in history, either ancient or modern ; that of the old Sixth Corps, 
from Manchester thirty-seven miles to Gettysburg. You, that were in 
that march, will never forget it, and on its arrival on the field, how the 
Corps pushed to the front just as the attack of Longstreet at the Round 
Top had been repulsed, only one brigade of the Corps becoming en- 
gaged. The Corps was honored by being held as the reserve of the 
army during the action, consequently only a few regiments and batteries 
became engaged, but never had the reserve troops of the army been 
so close to the front and continuously under fire than the Sixth Corps 
during the second and third of July, '63. 

Some writers of history inform us, that had Pickett's charge been 
well supported and had lie succeeded in breaking our line at the left 
centre, the tide of the battle would have been in favor of Lee. Not so, 
for the Sixth Corps was well in hand, ready and anxious to take part 
in the repulse, but they didn't get a chance, as the troops on that line 



EDWARD A. CULBERTSI >X, 
Co. G. 



PENNSYLVANIA \'< ILUNTEER INFANTRY. 



289 



'•weren't breaking tint day" and then the same historians state that 
during Pickett's charge, had Jeb Stuart succeeded in his dash around 
our right, the army would have become panic stricken, but the fact re- 
mains that away off on the right was one of the brigades of the Sixth 
Corps under General Thomas H. Neill, our old colonel, to watch and 
intercept just such ventures, but the Corps didn't get the chance to stop 
]eb, for our cavalry, under one of Pennsylvania's proud sons, General 
D. McM. Gregg, took good care of them and sent them back to their 
lines. While the Corps was here during the two days of the action, it 
was only by chance that any part of them became engaged. Our bri- 
gade, " Shaler's," composed of the Sixty-fifth New York, the "Chass- 
eurs," Sixty-seventh New York, First Long Island, Eighty-second 
Pennsylvania Infantry, One hundred and twenty-second New York and 
Twenty-third Pennsylvania, on arriving on the field moved into support- 
ing position near Little Round Top. In the early morning of the third, 
it was, by order of General Sedgwick, reported to General Geary, 
commanding the Second Division of the Twelfth Corps, as a support to 
his division, who were then engaged in driving out the enemy, who 
occupied the breastworks on this hill, "Culp's," that had been tempo- 
rarily abandoned, the evening before, while Geary had gone over to 
Round Top. The brigade marched out the Taneytown Road and 
crossed the field coming into posi- 
tion in a rocky ravine. The brig- 
ade massed behind a clump of 
woods. It was while here, that a 
staff officer of Geary's Division, 
took a detail of five companies 
under Lt. -Col. Glenn and placed 
them in the breastworks, the men 
being deployed and advanced into 
them under severe fire, it being 
the intention to cross the works 
at the call of the bugle, to feel 
the enemy, there having been a 
lull in the firing, but as the 
enemy's position having been un- 
covered, these companies became 
engaged. This was during the 
heavy shelling, prior to Pickett's 
charge. During the charge, the 
regiment, with the brigade, moved off to support the Second Corps at 
the left centre, passing through a most terrible storm of shot and shell, 
equivalent to charging a batterv. This being the position that the regi- 
ment was engaged while occupying the breastworks, they have selected 




ALEXANDER JOHNSON. 
Corporal Co. F. 



290 HISTORY OF THE TWKNTY-THIRD REGIMENT 

this site where the tablet is now placed, to mark their position, showing 
it to have been one of the relieving regiments, and in doing so we claim 
no honors that belong to the gallant Second Division of the Twelfth 
Corps, who so bravely and gallantly held the works thev had built. 

During some of the most desperate charges of the action, one of 
the incidents that occurred, was that when the regiment moved off 
to the support of the Second Corps during the heavy shelling, that " H" 
Company was left behind and it was not discovered until the regiment 
stacked arms that night. Captain Craig, one of the bravest and best 
line officers in the regiment, who commanded the company, did not 
receive the order to retire, and remained until he did. 

As we read the names of our Corps, Division, Brigade and Regi- 
ment Commanders, we find that many of them have been called to the 
encampment above. Among those who were killed, was that gallant 
soldier Sedgwick, in the Wilderness ; the hard fighter, Russell, at 
Winchester, while General Birney, our beloved Colonel, who rose to 
command an Army Corps, was called home to die from disease con- 
tracted in the field, while those who lived to see the nation restored 
and have since died, are Patterson, Cadwalader, Wheaton, Thomas, 
Abercrombie, Ely and our own Thomas H. Neill. Among the living 
are General Keyes, who resides at San Francisco, Franklin and Couch, 
at Hartford, Conn., Buell, at Louisville, Ky. , Newton, Shaler and 
Cochran, New York City ; Edwards in Iowa and Glenn at Philadel- 
phia. May they have prosperity and plenty, and live to a good old 
age. As to the boys, the death roll is a long one, both during the ser- 
vice and since. May the survivors march along the road of life, cheered 
with plenty of good store, until we all are mustered out. 

To our friends who have been so kind in assisting us to erect 
this tablet to the memory of the old Command, they have our most 
grateful thanks. In their names and that of the survivors of the Twenty - 
third Pennsylvania Volunteers, I now deliver this tablet. May the 
country never again be called to arms, but peace and prosperity exist 
for all time to come. 

General Alexander Shaler, who commanded the brigade of which 
the Twenty-third was a part, who had been selected as the orator, then 
delivered a most able oration, giving a concise history of the regi- 
ment's services, and while he had learned that it was at first in dispute 
that the regiment's monument should be placed at Culp's Hill, he had 
brought with him the report of its colonel, written on July 4, [863, 
containing the names of two officers and twenty-nine enlisted men who 
had been killed and wounded while in the action, and he was glad to 
note the matter had been adjusted and that the Twenty-third's monu- 
ment was now in position where it was engaged. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 291 

Re-dedication of tKe Twenty-tHird Pennsyl- 
vania Monument at Gettysburg, June, 1888 

The State of Pennsylvania, having appropriated $1500 for 
the erection of a monument to each of the commands from the 
Keystone State that participated in the battle of Gettysburg, 
the design selected by the Twenty-third was a granite statue 
of a Birney Zouave, to surmount their monument erected in 
1886 at Culp's Hill. Upon this occasion the survivors of 
Shaler's Brigade and their friends came on special trains to 
dedicate the monuments of the Twenty-third and Eighty-second 
Pennsylvania, Sixty-fifth New York, "The Chasseurs", Sixtv- 
seventh New York, "The First Long Island" and One Hundred 
and Twenty-second New York. The reunion of three davs 
was a most pleasant and happy one, it being the first time the 
brigade had met since mustered out. The Twentv-third acted 
as the host, keeping open house, and in honor of the event 
gave a grand complimentary ball in the Rink Building. At the 
camp-fire held in the Court House, the brigade committee 
selected the secretary of the Twentv-third to preside ; quite an 
honor and compliment to the regiment. 

On the march out to the dedication grounds, the battle- 
fiags of the regiment were carried by Comrades David Colville, 
and William H. Bantom, of Philadelphia, and John Moffitt, 
of Pittsburg, Pa. 

The exercises at the dedication opened with music by the 
McKnightstown Band, followed bv the Rev. Dr. H. YV. Mc- 
Knight, President of the Gettysburg College — a veteran of 
the Sixth Corps — who eloquently delivered a fervent prayer. 

Colonel John F. Glenn, of Philadelphia, President of the 
Survivors' Association, Twenty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, 
then delivered the following address : 

COLONEL JOHN F. GLENN'S ADDRESS. 

Comrades of the Twenty-third Pennsylvania I 'olunteers 
and Friends of Shaler s Brigade : 

• ' We assemble here to-day to unvail a Statue that surmounts our 
Monument, that we had the honor to dedicate some two years ago, 
and it is with feelings of gratification that I extend congratulations to 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



293 



the Twenty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers and Comrades of Shaler's 
Brigade, for such a large attendance of their survivors on this hallowed 
ground — and in their name I most heartily thank our friends who have 
honored the occasion by their presence. To the State of Pennsyl- 
vania we extend our grateful thanks 
for the gift which I now unveil, 
that of a Birnev Zouave — and in 
saying this I assure the Common- 
wealth of Pennsylvania of the grati- 
tude of all the Survivors of the 
Twenty-third Pennsylvania Volun- 
teer Infantry." 

The Statue was then unveiled 
amid the applause of the crowd and 
music of the bands, by the follow- 
ing ladies : Mrs. Colonel John F. 
Glenn, Mrs. Colonel William J. 
Wallace, Miss Emma Wray, 
(daughter of the Secretary ) of 
Philadelphia, Mrs. Captain James 
M. Craig, of Allegheny City, and 
Mrs. John Motrin, of Pittsburg. 
After order was restored, Presi- 
dent Glenn introduced Comrade William J. Wray, of Philadelphia, 
Secretary of the Survivors' Association, Twenty-third Pennsylvania 
Volunteers, who presented the Statue to the Battlefield Memorial 
Association in the following address : 




JOHN GIBSON. 
Corporal Co. G. 



WILLIAM J. WRAY'S ADDRESS. 

Mr. Secretary and Members of the Gettysburg 
Battlefield Memorial Association : 

On August 6, 1886, the Survivors' Association of the Twenty-third 
Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, and their friends, had the honor to 
dedicate and turn over to the keeping of your Association this Tablet, 
that marks the position of the Twenty-third during the action of July 
3, 1863. On that occasion, General Alexander Shaler, as orator of 
the day, after reviewing the action at Gettysburg, and history of the 
Regiment, in most eloquent words, generously paid tribute to the com- 
mand as its Brigade Commander. 

Since that time the State of Pennsylvania having appropriated 
the sum of $1,500 to each Pennsylvania command that participated in 
the action for the erection of monuments, our Association appointed 
the required committee and selected a design of a Statue to surmount 



L'!I4 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



their Tablet. The Pennsylvania State Commission on Gettysburg 
Monuments having approved of our selection, the work was ordered 
done, and we are here to-day to transfer to the keeping of the Battle- 
field Memorial Association, this granite work of art, just unveiled — a 

Statue of a " Birney Zouave. ' ' You 
will observe the figure represents 
a youthful soldier, who advancing 
up the slope at trail arms, grasps 
his musket impulsively, as he sud- 
denly receives the fire of the enemy. 
It is quite a departure from the dress 
parade figure usually cut in granite, 
and while not regulation as to the 
position of the musket, it is realistic 
— thus showing the soldier under 
fire — and one more appropriate on 
a battlefield. The surroundings 
being woodland — the figure is sup- 
ported by a broken tree, appar- 
ently struck by a piece of shell — 
all details as to uniform and accou- 
trements have been brought artis- 
■ork of art in the keeping of your 




michael Mccormick, 

Co. A 



tically out, — and in placing this 
Association, we deem it a pleasant duty we owe to thank you for the 
faithful manner in which you have labored for the preservation of this 
field — and in the name of the Survivors of the Twenty-third Pennsylvania 
Volunteer Infantry we gratefully acknowledge the gift of the State of 
Pennsylvania which so generously appropriated the funds for its erection. 

Secretary John M. Krauth, of Gettysburg, received the Statue on 
behalf of the Battlefield Memorial Association, in a brief address. 

Seventy-five ladies of the Twenty-third, as choristers, than sang 
the following verses of the National Hymn — "America." 



My country ! 'tis of thee, 
Sweet land of liberty, 

< m thee I sing : 
Land where my fathers died ! 
Land oi the Pilgrim's pride 
From every mountain side 

Let Freedom ring ! 

My native c itry, thee, 

I .and of the noble free, 

Thy name I love ; 
I l( ive thy rocks and rills, 
Thy woods and templed hills 
My heart with i apture thrills, 

I .ike that above. 



Let music swell the breeze, 
And ring from all the trees 

Sweet freedom's song : 
Let mortal tongues awake ; 
Let all that breathe partake ; 
I et rocks their silence break, 
I he sound prolong. 

( Mn fathers' < >od, to Thee, 
Author of Liberty, 

I'o Thee we sing ; 
Long may our land he bright 
With Freedom's holy light ; 
Protect in l>\ Thy might, 

< ire.it ( Hid, our King. 



PENNSYLVANIA YnFFNTKER INFANTRY. 



295 



With music of the band, and everybody joining in the singing, 
the inspiring melody that went up in the woods, made a scene long to 
be remembered. Then followed the singing of the " Doxology." 

Praise < '.<>d. from Whom all blessings How ; 
Praise Him, all creatures here below ; 
Praise Him above, ye heavenly host ; 
Praise Father, Son, and Holy Ghost. 

Benediction was then pronounced by the Rev. H. W. McKnight. 
Taps was then sounded on the bugle by Bugler Blanck, of 
Philadelphia. 



GENERAL SHALER'S ORATION. 

Comrades of the Old Brigade, 

Ladies and Gentlemen: 

We meet to-day upon historic grounds. Some of us have met 
here before. Twenty-five years ago, within a few days, two great 
armies confronted each other in this vicinity. ( >ne in defense of State 
Rights, the other in defense of United States Rights. One assaulted 
the Union, the other defended it. 

I shall not attempt to describe, in full, the great battle which en- 
sued, relate the causes which led to 
it, nor discuss the effect upon the 
country of the resulting victory of 
the Union Army ; but content my- 
self with a brief synopsis of the part 
taken in this and other battles by 
that portion of the Sixth Corps in 
which we had the honor of serving. 

Let us go back to the autumn 
of 1 86 1. The "tocsin of war had 
sounded." The cry to arms had 
reverberated throughout the land. 
Fathers, husbands, brothers and 
sons turned their backs upon their 
children, their wives, their parents 
and all that was dearest to them on 
earth, and rushed impulsively to 
the defense of the Union. To show 
how spontaneous and how general this outburst of patriotism was,' it 
may be stated, that between July 27, 1861, and October 27, (a period 
of three months) there were added to the army, than organizing, about 
120,000 men ; and that in December following, there were in the vicin- 
ity of Washington, and in the Shenandoah Valley, over 200,000 men 
in battle array. 




PA IK-ICK HICKEY, 
Co. F. 






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296 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Washington and its suburbs was one grand encampment. Troops 
from every loyal State were being marshalled and prepared for active 
service. General George B. McClellan, whom we familiarly called 
"Little Mac," owing to his success in West Virginia, in the summer 
of 1 86 1, had been called to Washington to organize and command an 
army for the double purpose of defending the Capital and of taking the 
field. As regiment after regiment arrived, they were organized into 
brigades and divisions without much reference to the States from which 
they came, and were encamped contiguous to each other. At Queen's 
farm, on the Bladensburg road, just on the outskirts of the city, the 
Twenty-third Pennsylvania, Colonel Birney ; the Thirty-first Pennsyl- 
vania, which afterwards became the Eighty-second Pennsylvania, Col- 
onel Williams ; the Sixty-fifth New York, Colonel Cochrane, and the 
Sixty-seventh New York, Colonel Adams, were encamped and formed 
what was known as Graham's Brig- 
ade, under the command of Briga- 
dier-General Pike Graham, an of- 
ficer formerly of the United States 
Cavalry service. This Brigade 
formed a part of the Division com- 
manded by General Don Carlos 
Buell. 

As early as October, 1861, 
the organization of the army was 
practically completed, and from 
that time until April, 1862, when 
the Peninsula campaign was begun, 
were drilled and schooled in the 
practices of war. The monotonous 
routine of camp life was varied only 
by an occasional wild rumor of ap- 
proaching rebels, and a reconnais- 
sance of the surrounding country. 

With the exception of a skirmish at Lewinsville, Virginia, just be- 
yond Chain Bridge, in which a part of the Brigade (the Chasseur regi- 
ment ) was engaged, the troops had so far experienced only the drudg- 
ery and the jollities of camp life. But this was ended in the spring of 
1862, by the cry of "On to Richmond," when our Brigade, with the 
rest of the army, took transports at Alexandria, for Fortress Monroe. 
In the meantime the Sixty-first Pennsylvania, Colonel Rippey, had 
joined us. 

The campaign was begun witrTthree Corps of the army, to wit : — 
the Second, commanded by General Sumner ; the Third, commanded 
by General Heintzelman, and the Fourth, commanded bv General 




ELIAS LOMAX, 
Co. I. 



298 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 




JAMES J. BOLESTRIDGE, 

Co. K. 



Keyes. Couch's Division, to which we were attached, belonged to 
Keyes' Corps. Our advance up the Peninsula was slow and tedious, 
although no enemy was seen until we reached Yorktown. Pending the 
siege of that place we were occupied in watching Warwick River. The 

battle of Williamsburg followed 
the evacuation of Yorktown, and 
< >ur Brigade, after marching all day 
through a drizzling rain and mud 
ankle-deep, reached the battle- 
field in time to support some of 
Hooker's troops in making their 
final charge. 

Before we had advanced far 
enough from Fortress Monroe to 
see the enemy, General Graham 
was relieved from duty and Gen- 
eral Wessels, also of the regular 
army, put in command of the 
Brigade. General Wessels was in 
a short time succeeded by an- 
other regular officer, General 
Abercrombie, who was with us 
at Fair Oaks, and retained the command until after the second battle 
of Bull Run, fought by General Pope. 

We crossed the Chickahominy at Bottom's Bridge about the 25th 
of May, and advanced within five miles of Richmond, where, at Seven 
Pines and Fair Oaks, on the 31st of May, was fought the first import- 
ant and severe battle of the campaign. In this battle the regiments 
of our Brigade were separated. We were encamped along the NitVe 
Mile Road, extending from Seven Pines, on the Williamsburg Pike, to 
Fair Oaks Station on the Richmond and York Railroad. 

Owing to the suddenness of the enemy's attack, the Twenty-third 
Pennsylvania and the Sixty-seventh New York, were thrown forward, 
while marching towards Fair ( >aks on the Nine Mile road, into a dense 
pine grove on the left, through which the enemy was advancing. They 
succeeded, with the Thirty-first Pennsylvania and the Sixty-firsl Penn- 
sylvania, already in line, in checking that advance, but were subse- 
quently forced to retire with very heavy losses. In this onslaught the 
Sixty-first Pennsylvania lost its Colonel 1 Rippey) and was badly cut 
up. Their resolute stand, however, enabled the rest of the Brigade to 
reach Fair Oaks Station, where, after holding position a short time, 
the Thirty-first Pennsylvania and the Sixty-first Pennsylvania having 
previously taken position in advance of their camps near the railroad 
station, they were withdrawn under the personal supervision of < ieneral 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



2UU 



Couch, the division commander, with a section of Brady's Battery, the 
Sixty-third New York, Colonel Riker, and the Seventh Massachusetts, 
Colonel Devens, along the road leading to the Grape Vine Bridge, as 
far as the Adams House. 

The Thirty-first Pennsylvania, the Sixty-fifth New York, and two 
companies of the Sixty-first Pennsylvania, which had been on the 
picket line, were posted in the order named on the right of the road 
facing and on the edge of a dense woods ; while the Sixty-second New 
York, Brady's guns, and the Seventh Massachusetts were posted in 
the order named on the left of the road, on a knoll overlooking an 
open field and flanking the woods along which the first-named regi- 
ments had been formed. 

The enemy's advance through the piece of woods was resolute and 
persistent. Regiment after regiment was brought forward to drive us 
back and get on the flank of Brady's guns, but without avail. The 
dogged tenacity with which the men of the Thirty-tirst Pennsylvania, 
the Chasseurs and the Sixty-first Pennsylvania clung to their position, 
outmatched the fierceness of the enemy's assault. 

Despairing of success in their efforts to flank the artillery, the 
enemy essayed a direct attack, but with no better success, although a 
few dead rebels were found within twenty yards of the muzzles of the 
guns. This attack was made about 
2 o'clock in the afternoon, and so 
sudden that the Brigade Com- 
mander, General Abercrombie, was 
caught in the woods between the 
lines and received a slight wound in 
the face. Between 4 and 5 o'clock, 
the leading Brigade of Sedgwick's 
Division and Kirbv's Battery of 



twelve-pounders, which had crossed 
the Chickahominy on the Grape- 
vine Bridge, arrived on the field. 

The infantry were posted on 
the right and in the rear of our line, 
and the artillery on the knoll beside 
Brady's two guns. Other infantry 
were put in position on the left of 
the artillery, and connection made 
with the troops which had been 
forced back by the impetuosity of the assault. Fresh troops were ad- 
vanced by the enemy and the battle raged until dark, but not an inch 
of ground was yielded. The conduct of our men in this battle furn- 
ishes an example of the benefits derived from proper instruction and 




JOHN MAXWELL, 
Captain Co. G. 



: ;i ii i 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 




rigid discipline. Under guidance of their officers, they reserved their 
fire until the enemy could be seen through the thicket in front of them. 
As a result, a large proportion of the shots were effective. The 
Chasseur regiment captured a battle flag and the next morning buried 

over one hundred rebels found in 
their front. 

The following day the Brigade 
was again united and moved to an 
advanced position. On the 26th of 
June the extreme right of our army 
at Mechanicsville was attacked by 
the rebels in force, and from that 
time until July 1st, when the battle 
of Malvern Hill was fought, we ex- 
perienced all the trials and suffer- 
ings incident to a forced march of 
six days, without sleep, shelter or 
regular food. At Malvern Hill, our 
Division having been among the 
first to arrive was naturally assigned 
the most important position. There 
several times it was assailed by the 
rebels, who were repulsed with fear- 
ful loss. On the right of the line, held by Couch's Division, the 
Chasseur regiment was at one time compelled to change front under 
fire, and did it with such wonderful coolness and precision as to com- 
mand the admiration and the compliments of the Brigade commander. 
The six weeks' encampment of the Army of the Potomac at Harri- 
son's Landing, on the James River, its transfer to the City of Wash- 
ington, the part it took in supporting Pope's army in the second battle 
of Bull Run, and its subsequent reorganization by General McClellan, 
furnish nothing of special note in reference to our Brigade, except that 
( ieneral John Cochrane, who had been promoted from the Colonelcy of 
the Chasseur regiment after the battle of Fair Oaks, was put in com- 
mand of our Brigade in the place of General Abercrombie, who had 
been assigned to duty at Centreville, after Pope's campaign, and Couch's 
Division was transferred to the Sixth Corps, then commanded by Gen- 
eral Franklin. 

In the reorganization of the army, early in September, while on 
the march, the One-hundred and twenty-second New York regiment, 
Colonel Silas Titus, was added to our Brigade, and we became the First 
Brigade, Third Division, Sixth Corps. 

After the defeat of Pope, at Manassas, Lee boldly struck out north- 
ward, in the direction of Leesburg, necessitating great caution on the 



BROTHERS 
ROBERT and WASHINGTON ELLIOTT, 
Co. C. 



'ENNSYLVAMA V< >LUNTEER INFANTRY, 



301 



part of McClellan, who had been again verbally placed in command of 
the troops about Washington, embracing those designated as the Army 
of Virginia. 

The battlefield of Antietam was reached by our Brigade early in 
the afternoon of the I yth of September, after a tramp through Pleasant 
Valley and up to the top of Maryland Heights, in search of the rebel 
General McLaws, on one of the hottest days and over the dustiest road 
we had ever marched. At Antietam we relieved that part of the line 
to the right of a corn-field and immediately in front of Dunker Church. 
This line we occupied until the morning of the 19th, when our Divis- 
ion was put in pursuit of the fleeing rebels, the rear guard of which we 
had a fight with, and drove across the river at Williamsport. 

McClellan' s tardiness after the battle of Antietam caused much 
uneasiness and great dissatisfaction with the authorities at Washington, 
and resulted in his being relieved at Warrenton, and General Burnside 
being placed in command of the Army of the Potomac on the 9th of 
November, 1862. 

Upon the reorganization of the army which followed, General 
Couch was assigned to the command of the Second Corps and General 
John Newton was put in command of the Third Division, Sixth Corps. 

In the calamitous failure of Burnside' s attack on Fredericksburg, 
December 13th to the 15th, the Sixth Corps, then in command of Gen- 
eral W. F. Smith, popularly known as "Baldy Smith," formed a part 
of the Left Grand Division, commanded by General Franklin. 

We crossed the Rappahannock about three miles below the city, 
near the Bernard House, and 
supported General Meade in his 
attack upon the enemy's right, 
without serious loss, although 
constantly under a heavy artil- 
lery fire. On the 20th of Jan- 
uary following, General Burnside 
considered that "the auspicious 
moment had arrived" and issued 
his orders for recrossing the Rap- 
pahannock at Banks' Ford. No 
sooner had the troops broken 
camp than the rain commenced 
to fall in torrents, and, after talking it over. 

floundering around a whole day, they returned to camp at night, 
having added nothing to our prestige or that of the commanding Gen- 
eral, and nothing to history, except the record of a "mud march." 

General Burnside' s retirement from the command of the army soon 
followed, and General Hooker, already known as "Fighting Joe" for 




302 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



his gallant and persistent assaults upon the rebel earthworks at Wil- 
liamsburg, on the Peninsula, and at South Mountain and Antietam, 
superseded him. Then followed another reorganization of the army, 
in which the Sixty-first Pennsylvania was taken from our Brigade and 
made a part of the Light Brigade, organized for special purposes. 

The resignation of General Cochrane, on the ist of March, 1863, 
placed the speaker in command of the Brigade. General Hooker's 
first field operation was an effort to crush the Army of Northern Virginia 
at Chancellorsville. 

It was part of his plan to have Sedgwick, who now commanded 
the Sixth Corps, assault and carry the Heights of Fredericksburg, move 
out on the road to Chancellorsville, and strike the rear of Lee's army 
while he, Hooker, engaged it in front. For that purpose the Sixth 
Corps crossed the Rappahannock below Fredericksburg, near the old 

Franklin crossing, on April 29th, and 
on the night of Saturday, May 2d, at 
1 A. M., commenced a flank march into 
Fredericksburg. 

( >ur Brigade was honored with the 
advance and instructed to let nothing 
impede the march through the town, 
over the heights and out on the Chan- 
cellorsville road ; an easy order for a 
General to give, but not easy of execu- 
tion, in the presence of a wide awake 
enemy, holding earthworks across your 
path, an effort to take which had 
already cost 15,000 lives. After driving 
in the outposts, in which the Chasseur 
regiment, under the lamented Hamblin, showed conspicuous gallantry, 
losing many men and leaving Major Healy on the ground mortally 
wounded, as was supposed, we continued our march until the enemy's 
line of defences at the foot ofMarye's Heights was encountered, when, 
by order of the Division commander, the head of the column entered the 
city, leaving one of our regiments, the Twenty-third Pennsylvania, de- 
ployed in the open field facing the never-to-be-forgotten stone wall. 
When daylight appeared the men of the Twenty-third found themselves 
exposed t<> tile enemy's tire, and for five long hours, without an oppor- 
tunity to even make a cup of coffee, they maintained this harassing 
position. About 10 o'clock Sunday morning the columns and deployed 
lines were formed by General Newton for storming the heights. The 
column on the extreme right was composed of the Sixty-first Pennsyl- 
vania and Forty-third New York, of the Light Brigade, under the 
command oi Colonel Spear, and was supported by the Eighty-second 




JESSE CORNELL, 
Co. K. 



II NNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



303 



Pennsylvania and the Sixty-seventh New York, of our Brigade, under 
command of the speaker. The Twenty -third Pennsylvania formed a 
part of the deployed line on the left of the second column of attack. 
The Chasseur regiment and the One hundred and twenty-second New 
York were directed to follow with the rest of our Division and join the 
Brigade after the heights had been carried. 

Upon the opening of Newton's batteries both columns debouched 
from under cover, and the deployed lines advanced to the assault. 
Spear's column on the right was enfiladed by batteries stationed in the 
road at the top of the hill and in the works on each side of the road ; 
rifle pits at the base of the hill also confronted him. The column moved 
out on the double quick, but the road was narrow and before the col- 
umn had passed over half the distance it was literally swept away by 
the iron hail showered upon it. Colonel Spear fell mortally wounded, 
Major Bassett, with the Eighty-sec- 
ond Pennsvlvania, found himself at 
the head of the column, and strug- 
gled manfully to carry his men for- 
ward, and finally, encouraged by the 
presence of their Brigade Com- 
mander with his two aidis, Lieuten- 
ants Armstrong and Johnson, rushed 
forward with the Sixty -seventh New 
York and carried the heights, cap- 
turing two pieces of the Washington 
battery of artillery, one officer and 
a number of men. The Twenty- 
third Pennsylvania, in deployed line, 
with the Fifth Wisconsin, Sixth 
Maine and Thirty-first New York, 
moved gallantly to the charge. An 
eye witness belonging to the Sec- 
ond Division, in speaking of this line, says, "Four more gallant 
regiments could not be found in the service. Leaving everything but 
guns and ammunition they started forward, encountering a shower of 
bullets, grape and canister, as soon as they rose above a slight knoll. 
It was a noble spectacle and filled our hearts with pride for our brave 
comrades." 

The Brigade was subsequently united and marched out on the road 
to Chancellorsville. The enemy's occupation of Salem Heights stop- 
ped our advance, and in the battle which ensued we took position in an 
open field to the right of the road, which was held until the evening of 
the fourth, when the whole Corps recrossed the Rappahannock at 
Banks' Ford and returned to our old camps. Throughout this short 




EDWIN PALMER. 
Captain Co. D. 



304 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 




campaign the conduct of the officers and men of our Brigade was every- 
thing that could be desired ; and it was through no fault of theirs or 
any other part of the Sixth Corps, that Hooker's first campaign came 
to such an inglorious end. 

Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville had so improved the morale 

of the rebel army which had been 
reinforced by two of Longstreet's 
divisions from the James River and 
a large number of conscripts from 
Richmond, that Lee determined 
upon an invasion of the North. 
This threw the Army of the Poto- 
mac on the defensive. So, on the 
13th of June, Hooker broke up his 
camp on the Rappahannock and 
moved northwards. The Sixth 
Corps had on the 6th of that month 
again crossed the river at the Ber- 
nard House, and for a week ob- 
served the movements of the rebels 
who occupied the defences of 
Fredericksburg Heights, but re- 
crossed and followed the main 
army on the 14th by forced marches until the vicinity of Washington 
was reached. The Potomac River was crossed at Edward's Ferry on 
the 26th of June, and the inarch of the army directed on Frederick 
City. About this time differences arose between General Halleck at 
Washington, and General Hooker, in relation chiefly to the disposition 
of the forces at Harper's Ferry, and General Hooker asked to be re- 
lieved. General George G. Meade, then commanding the Fifth Corps, 
was immediately placed in command of the army. 

From Frederick City our Corps marched to Manchester, which 
would have been the extreme right of the arm)' if Meade's line of battle 
had been formed along Pipe Creek, as some suppose he had intended. 
But events occurred which determined Gettysburg to be the ground 
upon which was to be fought the mightiest and most sanguinary battle 
of modern times. The operations of the First and Eleventh Corps on 
Seminar}' Ridge, where Reynolds lost his life <>n the 1st of July, 
were important, in that they prevented the rebels from occupying the 
favorable ground upon which our army was subsequently formed for 
battle. 

On the night of the 1st of July our Corps was at Manchester, 
thirty-six miles away. At 9 o'clock in the evening we stalled for 
Gettysburg and did not halt for any length of time until we reached 



SAMUEL C. DUSWALI), 
Corporal Co. G. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



305 



Rock Creek, which crosses the Baltimore Pike about a mile from here. 
There we rested and made coffee. Resuming the march we moved on 
to the base of Little Round Top, where the Fifth Corps was stemming 
tin- libel current which had forced back portions of the Third Corps. 
Two of our brigades were immediately thrown forward to the relief of the 
Fifth Corps, while the rest were placed in line of reserve. Before leav- 
ing Manchester, our Division Commander, (ieneral Newton, took leave 
of us and went immediately to the front to assume command of the 
First Corps in the place of (ieneral Reynolds, who had been killed that 
morning, and General Wheaton, by virtue of his rank, assumed com- 
mand of the Division. 

This march of the Sixth Corps, of thirty-six miles in seventeen 
hours, on a sultry summer night and morning, is probably the most 
memorable one of the war. When we consider the load which a soldier 
carries on the march, even in light marching order, the absence in the 
field of all comforts which he enjoyed at home, and the peril to life and 
limb which constantly surrounds him, we cannot but admire the pluck 
and courage with which he undertakes the most difficult and perilous 
tasks and honor him for the sacrifices he makes. 

About sunrise on the morning of the 3d, our Brigade was ordered 
to Culp's Hill to aid General Geary, of the Twelfth Corps, in retaking 
the works on the extreme right, 
occupied by the enemy during the 
previous night. The seriousness 
of Longstreet's attack upon our 
left induced General Meade to 
order reinforcements from Gen- 
eral Slocum, commanding on this 
part of the field, which necessi- 
tated the evacuation of a part of 
the line before established. These 
works were seized by the wily 
enemy, and at daylight our troops 
undertook to dislodge him and 
drive him back. 

Upon reporting to General 
Geary, our Brigade was formed 
in the open field, just in rear of 
the line of defenses, in a column of 
battalions deployed. After a personal reconnaissance by General Geary 
and the Brigade Commander, the One Hundred and Twenty-second New- 
York, Colonel Titus commanding, was directed to relieve the One Hun- 
dred and Eleventh Pennsylvania, then occupying a position in the front 
line. This position they held for two hours and a half, under a very 




J( IHN G. JOHNSON, 
Co. H. 



30(5 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



severe fire, losing many in killed and wounded, and were then relieved 
by the Eighty-second Pennsylvania, Colonel Bassett. At 9. 20 A. M., 
the Twenty-third Pennsylvania, Lieutenant-Colonel Glenn commanding, 
was placed in position to support the front line. Three hours later, five 
companies of this regiment, under a galling fire of musketry, were ad- 
vanced into the breastworks, and, after silencing the enemy's fire, sent 
out a line of skirmishers, which, however, were promptly recalled, the 
enemy still being in the line of battle in close proximity to our works. 
At 1 1 A. M., the Sixty-seventh New York, Colonel Cross, marched 




"Right and Rear of Little Round Top." 

This was the first position of Shaler's Brigade occupied from the 
time of arrival on the field, about 2 p. M. of July 2d, in support of 
the advanced line of the 6th Corps, until the morning of July 3d, 
when ordered to Gulp's Hill to assist Geary of the 12th Corps in 
driving Johnson's Confederates out of the works. The view repre- 
sents to the rear and left of where General Sedgwick's head- 
quarters was established. 



into the breastworks, from which the enemy were then fleeing, and 
succeeded in capturing about twenty prisoners. At 1 1. 15 A. M., the 
Chasseur regiment (Sixty-fifth New York), Colonel Hamblin, occupied 
a position in support of the Twenty-third Pennsylvania. About,'? P.M., 
all of our regiments were relieved by others belonging to the Twelfth 
Corps. 

Longstreet's attack upon our left, and EwelPs attack upon our 
right had both failed; and now a desperate attempt to pierce our cen- 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 307 

tre was to be made. As a prelude to the grand assault of Pickett's 
Division, 115 pieces of artillery opened their murderous fire upon our 
lines, and were responded to by about 80 of our own guns. With the 
order and steadiness of troops on parade, Pickett's lines moved out in 
view and commenced to advance across the open field to a point just 
south of the Cemetery grounds marked by a clump of trees. No 
sooner was the point of his attack made manifest, than every available 
Union battery was trained upon his columns. The carnage which en- 
sued was terrible ; but on they came, alternately wavering, stagger- 
ing, rallying and pressing forward, until the rebel, General Armistead, 
found himself pierced by a rifle shot within our own lines, followed by 
a few hundred of the most fortunate and courageous of his men who 
became prisoners of war. It was while this was being enacted, that 
our brigade was called from this position on the right, to traverse the 
field and report to General Newton, commanding the 1st Corps, at the 
left centre, near the point of Pickett's assault. After the repulse of 
this infantry charge, the rebel batteries kept up a tantalizing, but 
irregular fire; and one of the last shots fired, lost to the Twenty-third 
regiment one of its most promising young officers, Lieutenant Garsed. 
A solid shot literally tore him to pieces. Before darkness had shrouded 
the field, the roar of artillery and the rattling of musketry had ceased. 
The great battle of the war had been fought. The stillness of the night 
was broken only by the groans of the wounded and dying, and the 
rumbling of ammunition and commissary wagons. The losses in both 
armies amounted to about 50,000 men, equal to one-third of the whole 
number engaged. 

The rebel army was now compelled to abandon all the hopes which 
its scheme of invasion had inspired ; and bitter as the alternative was, 
its retreat was imperative. So, after spending the fourth day in bury- 
ing the dead and caring for the wounded, it silently and sullenly retired 
from our front on the morning of the fifth, and the Sixth Corps was 
sent out on the Fairfield road in pursuit. Lee's rear guard was over- 
taken in a pass of the South Mountain range, but was not pursued 
beyond it, General Meade having determined to keep his army on the 
east side of that range. It crossed the Potomac at Harper's Ferry and 
Berlin, July 17th and iSth, and moved along the east of Blue Ridge, 
while Lee retreated up the Shenandoah Valley, west of Blue Ridge, 
and finally encamped in the vicinity of Culpeper Court House. The 
Army of the Potomac went into camp about Warrenton, Virginia. 

In an address which I had the honor of delivering upon these 
grounds, two years ago, on the occasion of the unveiling of the monu- 
ment of the Twenty-third Pennsylvania regiment. I took occasion to 
refer to an injustice which had been unintentionally done us, in the report 
of the battle by the Army Commander. As the remarks I then made 



308 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



in reference to the Twenty-third Regiment are applicable to each and all 
the regiments of our Brigade, I quote them verbatim. After speaking 
a word of praise in behalf of General Doubleday, of the First Corps, 
and General Sickles, of the Third Corps, for the services they rendered 
on the first and second days respectively, I say, " And while claiming 
this special recognition for them, I have a less pleasing, but to you a 
more important duty to perform, and that is, to demand an official 
recognition of the services, in this battle, of the Brigade to which you 
were attached. The student who in future years peruses the official 
reports and records in the War Department, will there find recorded, 




"Culp's Hill." 

This was the second position of Shaler's Brigade. On its arrival here 
General Geary of the 12th Corps placed it in the ravine immediately in 
rear of this position. During the morning the regiments ot the brigade 
were engaged in the breastworks, which will be observed running 
along just below the brow of the hill towards a large boulder in the 
works. It remained here as relieving regiments, until ordered to left 
centre, in support of 1st Corps during repulse of Pickett's charge. 



over the signature of the commander of the Army of the Potomac, 
that in the battle of Gettysburg, Wheaton's Brigade was ordered to 
the right, to aid in driving back the enemy and in retaking the works. 
In other words the troops of Wheaton's Brigade were credited, in 
the official report of the battle, with the service performed by your 
Brigade. Upon learning of this error, I spoke to General Meade 
about it, at an army reunion, held in Boston nine years after the battle, 
and he promised to have his report corrected. I spoke also to 
General Wheaton of the credit he had received at another's expense, 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 309 



and of the injustice done the regiments of the First Brigade. He 
promised that he would write to General Meade upon the subject, but 
I am not informed that either of the promises were fulfilled. As our 
great lamented President (Lincoln) said, in commenting upon the 
battle, 'There was glory enough for all.' No excuse, therefore, can 
be given for withholding from any of the troops engaged the full 
measure of credit due them, much less should one organization be 
glorified at the expense of another. In justice to the memory of those 
brave men whose heroic services you this clay commemorate, and in 
justice to you who have been permitted to survive them, and to per- 
form this act of soldierly love and friendship, I protest against the 
wrong which has been done. I may be answered that it matters little, 
so far as the Brigade is concerned, since the survivors have erected 
tablets upon one of the grounds they occupied in this battle. Is it of 
no consequence to the relatives and friends of those who have died 
for their country, to their comrades who have survived them, to the 
officers who commanded them, that the official reports are silent as to 
the services of the organization with which they fought and died ? 
Nay, more ; that such reports should actually give to another organiza- 
tion credit for services which cost them so many lives ? For years 
and perhaps ages to come, the archives of the war will be perused 
and studied bv historians and military students in search of material 
with which to compile history or solve military problems ; and must it 
be said to them, that the records are unreliable — that to ascertain the 
services of any particular organization of the army, a visit must be 
made to the battle-fields, and the monuments and tablets consulted ? 
Such a confession would be humiliating, but it must be made, so far as 
it relates to the services of the First Brigade, Third Division, Sixth 
Corps, in the battle of Gettysburg. And, if I am correctly informed, 
in reference to other organizations also. A greater value attaches, 
therefore, to the testimonials you this day dedicate, than you probably 
anticipated, for it corrects the record ; more than that, it stands alone 
as the only record accessible to all, that our Brigade fought and suf- 
fered in this part of the field in the greatest battle of the war." 

On the 7th of November following, an advance movement was 
ordered, and the right wing of the army, composed of the Fifth and 
Sixth Corps, under the command of General Sedgwick, was moved to 
a point on the river called Rappahannock Station, at which point the 
enemy occupied a series of earthworks on the north side of the river, 
consisting of two or three redoubts and a long line of rifle-pits or 
trenches. The approach to these works was over an open field, which 
could be swept by the enemy's guns for a considerable distance in 
every direction ; and as the head of our columns debouched from the 
woods to deplov in line of battle, they furnished a splendid target for 



:-;io 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



the rebel gunners' practice. The scene was grand beyond descrip- 
tion. When the speaker entered the open field, the Fifth and part of 
the Sixth Corps were already in line of battle, with flags flying and 
bayonets glistening in the sunlight of a beautiful autumn day, having 
the appearance of troops on dress parade rather than formed for 
deadly conflict. Like Humphreys' tactical movements of his Division 
on the field of Gettysburg, our Brigade was closed up, and without 
halting advanced and deployed in the position assigned it, having only 
the sound of the enemy's guns to keep step with. Without delay our 
Brigade was ordered to drive in the rebel sharpshooters and secure 
the possession of a knoll on the right and front, for the occupation of 




"Rear of Left Centre." 

This was the third position of Shaler's Brigade. On the ridge in 
the distance were the lines of the ist Corps, the brigade arriving 
about the time of the repulse of Pickett's charge, and went into posi- 
tion in the held beyond the Taneytown Road, to the left of Meade's 
Headquarters, where it remained until the morning of the 5th, when 
moved off with the 6th Corps in pursuit of Lee. 

a battery. This was quickly done, and soon after the battery was 
established, a column of attack was formed from the Sixth Corps and 
put in command of General Russell. Colonel Upton led the column 
with his regiment, and made one of the most brilliant and successful 
charges ever made upon any held. He not only captured the whole 
line of works, but with it, some sixteen hundred prisoners, six battle- 
flags, and many pieces of artillery and small arms. His attacking 
column numbered only fifteen hundred. The services of our Brigade 
as well as those of Upton's troops, were made the subject of a com- 
plimentary order from Corps Headquarters. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 311 

The next move of importance was Meade's effort to interpose 
his army between the two wings of Lee's army, and for that purpose 
directed the various Corps to cross the Rapidan at different points, the 
Sixth at 1. tcol>'s Mill ford, which they did on the 27th of November. 
Our Division was ordered to report to General Warren, to aid him in 
outflanking", if possible, the enemy's right. 

Sunday, November 29th, found us in what was then considered 
a favorable position from which to attack, and orders were issued for 
Warren to do so at 8 o'clock next morning. But when morning came 
things were changed. Lee had entrenched himself in our front and 
planted batteries on our left. The flankers were outflanked, and 
Warren's heart failed him. As he told the speaker afterwards "he 
had not the courage to attack." But he had the courage to 
sacrifice himself rather than his men. He assumed the responsibility 
of suspending the attack, and General Meade subsequently justified 
him. Thus ended the brief winter campaign of Mine Run, and we 
returned to our old camps. 

During December, 1S63, while in camp at Brandy Station, the 
government called upon the three year men, two years of service 
having expired, to re-enlist for three years from that date or the war. 
This call was responded to by the men of our regiments, with remark- 
able unanimity and promptitude, nearly two-thirds in the aggregate, 
voluntarily offering to continue their services until the last rebel laid 
down his arms. 

In January, 1864, our Brigade was ordered to Sandusky, Ohio, 
to prevent an anticipated attempt to liberate the rebel officers confined 
on Johnson's Island, Sandusky Bay, and remained there until the 12th 
of April, 1864, when Brigade Headquarters and three regiments ( the 
65th, 67th and i22d New York) proceeded to rejoin the army at 
Brandy Station. During our absence from the army, the old 3d Divi- 
sion was disbanded, and we were assigned to the 1st Division com- 
manded by General H. G. Wright, constituting the 4th Brigade of 
that Division. 

Grant's overland campaign to Richmond began at midnight, the 
3d of May. Our Brigade, or rather the three regiments of it in camp 
crossed the Rapidan on the 4th, in charge of an ammunition train 
which was parked a short distance in rear of the line of battle formed 
by the 5th and 6th Corps in the Wilderness, and at midnight on the 5th, 
moved forward and reported to our Division Commander. He assigned 
us to a position on the extreme right in support of General Seymour, 
who commanded the troops at that point. An advance of the line 
about 8 o'clock in the morning of the 6th, so shortened it that in 
order to retain possession of a prominence on our flank, our regiments 
had to be placed in the front line, thus presenting to the enemy a 



312 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 

single attenuated line where a strong, well supported one should have 
been. Early in the day we were called upon to send a regiment a 
little to the left, to the aid of General Xeill's Brigade which was being 
hard pressed. 

The 67th New York was sent in, and returned in about an hour, 
having lost about 100 men in that short time. Much anxiety was felt 
throughout the day for the safety of this flank which was practically in 
the air, guarded only bv a skirmish line thrown around to the rear, 
and subsequent events justified that anxiety. The attention of Corps 
Headquarters was repeatedly called to its weakness, but for reasons 
unknown to the speaker no troops were sent to us, and it was an easy mat- 
ter, therefore, when a Brigade of E well's Corps under General Gordon 
about 6 o'clock in the evening, drove in our skirmishers, to double up 
our single line of infantry. A few officers and men of each of our three 
regiments were captured, and many killed and wounded. The able 
bodied who escaped capture, reformed a line along the wood road, 
which crossed our line of batde perpendicularly, a few yards to the left. 

The Brigade Commander in reconnoitering on the borders of this 
road, with more zeal than caution, rode into the enemy's lines and was 
captured. This terminated his services with the Brigade in which he 
had served since the organization of the army, and to which he had 
become dearly attached. The command of the Brigade devolved upon 
Colonel Nelson Cross, of the 67th New York. 

In the successful assaults at Spottsylvania and Cold Harbor, and 
the defense of North Anna, which followed the batde of the Wilderness, 
its reputation was fully sustained. Throughout the trials encountered 
in the change of base to the South side of the James, and the besieging 
of Petersburg, its patience and its power of endurance was manifest ; 
and when a detached column under General Early, early in July, again 
threatened the National Capitol, the confidence of the Army Com- 
mander in its prowess, and its devotion to the cause, secured the trans- 
fer of the Sixth Corps to the point of danger. The old residents of 
Washington will never forget with what celerity the rebel General was 
made to retire from the front of the Capitol and subsequently beat an 
inglorious retreat up the Shenandoah Valley, before the war-scarred 
veterans of the Sixth Corps, which by the celerity of its movements, 
had become known as Sedgwick's Cavalry. 

After this short campaign we find the Brigade back again among 
its veteran comrades of the army, hammering away at the defenses of 
Petersburg, until on Sunday morning, April 2d, the final charge upon 
the works is made. The signal success of the Sixth Corps in this 
charge, not onlv carrying the line of defense in their front, but sweep- 
ing to the left and capturing a long line, thousands of prisoners and 
many guns, and subsequently turning; to the right again, driving every- 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 313 

thing before it, until the enemy was encircled within their last cordon 
of defenses, was the first of the series of staijgerini; blows which ulti- 
mately determined the fate of the Confederacy. The parallel race with 
Lee's army, which soon followed, gave another proof of its marching 
qualities. But it was at Sailor's Creek a few days later, where the for- 
tunes of war gave to the Sixth Corps the final opportunity to make still 
more brilliant its record by crushing forever and utterly destroying 
its ancient antagonist. It is not a little remarkable, but the fact is 
without dispute, that the Sixth Corps was confronted, in its four years 
of battling, oftener by Ewell's Corps than bv any other in the rebel 
army. There seemed, therefore, a Providential dispensation in the cir- 
cumstances which placed it in the power of the Sixth Corps at Sailor's 
Creek, Virginia, on the 6th of April, 1S65, to compel General Ewell 
and all that remained of his Corps, to lay down their arms and become 
prisoners of war. The crowning glory of a brilliant record. 

During the period of its services, the integrity of our brigade was 
preserved from beginning to end. While, by reorganizations of the 
army, and the necessities of the service, whole corps and divisions were 
broken up and disbanded, our brigade organization continued intact. 
Regiments were added to it and taken from it, indeed, to such an extent 
that but one of the original regiments retained its identity in the brigade, 
until the disbandment of the corps and final muster out. The Twen- 
ty-third Pennsylvania was mustered out at the close of the Vallev cam- 
paign, its re-enlisted men being transferred to the Eighty-second regi- 
ment. The Thirty-first Pennsylvania became the Eighty-second Penn- 
sylvania. The Sixty-seventh New York was mustered out at the end 
of three years, and the re-enlisted men were transferred to the Sixty- 
fifth New York. The One-hundred-and-twentv-second New York was 
not an original member, but joined in the Summer of 1862, and was 
transferred to Bidwell's Brigade of the Second Division, Sixth Corps, 
in the Summer of 1864. The Sixty-first Pennsylvania was taken to 
make up a Light Brigade, and never returned to us. The Sixty-fifth 
New York (First L'nited States Chasseurs, as it was called ), was, there- 
fore, the only one of all the original members, which retained its identitv 
through four long years of war, and until final disbandment of the 
army and muster out. It is said that this was the last regiment of the 
Army of the Potomac mustered out. 

Upon the muster out of the Sixty-seventh New York, Colonel 
Cross retired from the service, and the command of the brigade devolved 
upon Colonel Joe. E. Hamblin, of the Sixty-fifth New York, than whom 
a more gallant and faithful officer could not be found in the service. 

In this hastily prepared and imperfect record of the services of our 
brigade, it may be considered not improper to speak of the qualities of 
some of the Colonels of the regiments which composed it. It is a mat- 



314 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 

ter of historical record, which may be alluded to here, without dispar- 
agement to others. Most of them showed a capacity and talent for 
military service which sooner or later, secured for them deserved pro- 
motion. Colonel David B. Birney, of the Twenty-third Pennsylvania 
was made a Brigadier-General and Major-General of Volunteers. 
Colonel Thomas H. Neill, of the same regiment, was made Brigadier- 
General and Brevet Major-General. Colonel John Ely, also of the 
same regiment, was made a Brigadier-General. Colonel Nelson Cross, 
of the Sixty-seventh New York, was made a Brigadier-General and 
Brevet Major-General. Colonel John Cochrane, of the Sixty-fifth 
New York, was made a Brigadier-General. Colonel Alexander Shaler 
and Colonel Joe. E. Hamblin, of the same regiment, were both made 
Brigadier-Generals and Brevet Major-Generals of Volunteers. 

Having through the fortunes of war been separated from the 
brigade during the last year of its service, a period in which pro- 
motions would be most likely to occur, I have referred to those only 
of which I have personal knowledge. No brigade in the army was 
more fortunate in the quality of its officers; and, very many, too 
many to refer to here by name, were fur their superior talent and 
ability ; for their gallant conduct, and for long faithful services, pro- 
moted to higher grades, detailed to staff duty, and assigned to other 
special and honorable service. 

The case of Lieutenant- Colonel Dwight, of the One Hundred and 
Twenty-second New York, was one of unrewarded merit. He gal- 
lantly commanded the regiment in nearly all its battles, and until it 
was reduced below the number for which a Colonel could be mustered; 
and was finally killed in front of Petersburg, without having received 
the promotion which he bad repeatedly earned and was justly entitled to. 

The brigade was equally fortunate in the composition of its Staff, 
Captain William P. Roome, Assistant Adjutant-General; Captain 
Samuel Truesdell, Assistant Inspector-General; Major George W. 
Ford, Assistant Quartermaster, and Captain Nat. Ellmaker, Assistant 
Commissary of Subsistence, were all officers of the highest qualities, 
possessing especial fitness for their respective positions. They served 
throughout with unsurpassed zeal and faithfulness, and retired honored 
and respected by all with whom they had intercourse. 

To commemorate the services of this noble body of men upon this 
field of battle, and to dedicate memorials to their fallen comrades, we 
have met to-day. In looking back, visions pass before us like a dream. 
We see the demon of war with haughty mien uplift his arm to assail 
our national existence. Rebellious hordes are marshalled for unholy 
conquest. With rapid stride-, and swift approaches the swelling ranks 
besiege our capitol. Indignant loyalty with glaring astonishment nerves 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 315 



herself for defense. Liberty is fettered, and affrighted peace seeks 

safety in flight. 

To arms ! to arms ' the people cry, 
The danger to our Capitol is nigh. 

With sentiment akin to filial love, the masses with one accord 
uprise and bid defiance. The conflict rages. Heath, devastation and 
destruction revel. Gloom and sorrow prevail. Portentous clouds of 
darkness envelop us. Evil spirits, with hellish intent, pursue unchal- 
lenged their damnable ways. The angels mourn, and all nature in 
darkness weeps. But see, a silver lining appears. Peering with hope- 
ful aspect, Peace, with olive branch extended, seeks audience. In the 
distance seething masses of armed men struggle for mastery. With 
diminished force rebellion aims her blows, and finally sinks to rise no 
more. Victory perches on Loyalty's crest. Homeward turns the 
Spartan band, heroes all ! Halos of glory illumine the sky. Loved 
ones meet in joyous ecstasy. Liberty and peace have resumed their 
places. The dream has passed ; but stern reality bids us inquire, where 
is father, brother and son. In yonder graves they lie, victims of disloy- 
alty ; and martyrs for their country. Let us keep their memories green, 
and each recurring year cover them with immortelles, and sweet- 
scented flowers. And let us not forget the living heroes. Let us re- 
member that to them we are indebted for the blessings of peace and 
prosperity which our re-united country now enjoys. Let us remember 
that the "stars on our banner grew suddenly dim ;" and that it was the 
private soldier who restored to them their lustre, and palsied the hand 
which attempted their obliteration. While our children are taught to 
revere that emblem of unity and strength, let them also be taught 
the danger of assailing it. Teach them to honor its defenders ; and 
if in after time it should again be threatened, let them emulate the 
patriotic example set by their fathers on this hallowed spot. 

The band then played the following national anthem which was 
the first rendition of this afterwards popular song. 



316 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



GUARD THE FLAG. 

NEW NATIONAL SONG. 

This song is sung in the Public Schools everywhere, and at 
School-house flag-raisings ; it is also played by the bands of the U. S. 
Army and Navy. 

Words and Music by Geo. M. Vickers. 

(Published with Compliments of the Author.) 

Guard the flag, Guard the flag of our native land. 

Guard the flag of liberty ; 
Guard well the flag with heart and hand ; 

God save the banner of the free ! 

Sons of the nation, hold it aloft, 

Bravely its foes defy ; 
Our beautiful flag, the hope of the world, 

Ever shall wave on high ! 

Chorus. 

Guard the flag, Guard the flag of our native land, 

Guard the flag of liberty ; 

Guard the flag, Guard the flag of our native land, 

Guard the flag of liberty ; 

Guard well the flag with heart and hand ; 

God save the banner of the free! 

Guard the flag, Guard the flag that our fathers bore ; 

Let its pride our glory be ; 
Oh, let it wave o'er sea and shore, 

The starry emblem of the free ! 

Though 'neath it marching onward to war, 

Though 'neath its folds in peace, 
Our motto shall be to still guard the flag, 

Never our vigil cease ! 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 317 



Reunion of Shaler's Brigade, Gettysburg. 



"The Inspiration." 

DURING the dedication of the Twenty-third Pennsylvania 
Volunteers' Tablet at Gettysburg, in August, 1886, Gen- 
eral Alexander Shaler, who had the honor to command the 
First Brigade, Third Division, Sixth Army Corps, in said 
action — who was present on this occasion as the orator of the 
day — expressed a wish that the regiments of the old brigade 
should be reorganized for the purpose of dedicating their 
monuments and for a Reunion on the held at Gettysburg. 

In compliance with this wish a letter was prepared, setting 
forth the object, and mailed to each of its commands, request- 
ing that each Regimental Association elect a representative to 
serve as a Brigade Committee. 

On August 1, 1887, the following comrades having been 
selected : — General Alexander Shaler, representing Headquar- 
ters; Colonel Samuel Truesdell, the Sixty-fifth New York, " The 
Chasseurs;" James N. Mills, Sixty-seventh New York, "The 
First Long Island;" Captain Robert H. Moses, the One-hun- 
dred-and-twentv-second New York ; Lieutenant-Colonel John 
M. Wetherill, of Pottsville, the Eighty-second Pennsylvania, and 
William J. Wray, of Philadelphia, the Twenty-third Pennsyl- 
vania, " Birney's Zouaves," met at the office of Colonel Trues- 
dell, New York City, and organized Shaler's Brigade Associa- 
tion, Survivors of the Sixth Army Corps, by the selection of 
General Alexander Shaler as President, William J. Wray as 
Secretary and Treasurer, with General Nelson Cross, Sixty- 
seventh New York Volunteers, Lieutenant-Colonel John M. 
Wetherill, Eighty-second Pennsylvania Volunteers, Colonel 
Silas Titus, One-hundred-and-twenty-second New York Vol- 
unteers, Colonel John F. Glenn, Twenty-third Pennsylvania 
Volunteers, Lieutenant-Colonel Henry G. Healy, Sixty-fifth 
New York Volunteers, Colonel William P. Roome, Headquar- 
ters Staff, as Vice-Presidents. Selected June 12, 13, 14, 1888, 
for Dedication of Monuments and Reunion of the Brigade, at 
Culp's Hill, Gettysburg, requesting each Regimental Associa- 
tion to arrange an excursion from their respective headquar- 
ters for their survivors and friends. 



318 



HISTORY OF THK TWENTY-THIRD KF.GIMF.NT 



About January, 188S, the Sixty- seventh New York Volun- 
teer Association changed the date of their dedication to July 
I, 2, 3, 1 888. With the other organizations of the Brigade, the 
work progressed favorably; and at the Brigade Committee 
meeting, May 9th, in New York City, the final details were 
formulated, and the Secretary instructed to issue the following 
circular letter : — 

The Excursion. 

THE One-hundred-and-twenty-second New York, having 
the longer distance to travel, added one more day to the 
trip, leaving Syracuse on Monday afternoon, June nth, with 
three coaches filled with their survivors, ladies and friends. 

On reaching Canandaigua a 
sleeper was attached to their 
train, the railroad company 
showing them every atten- 
tion, making them as com- 
fortable as possible for their 
long journey. After a most 
pleasant ride, during which 
old associations were revived 
and renewed, they reached 
j^ -"^flr ^^^/ Gettysburg about 7 A. M. of 
\ WJ the first day, Justin time to 

sit down to breakfast at their 

« mr headquarters — theGlobelnn. 

^B I .?>" As the balance of the Brigade 

^^3 ^^^ were not expected to arrive 

before noon, individually and 
in squads they started off 
sight-seeing, the point of attraction being Gulp's Hill, the scene 
where the Brigade went in on the third day of the action. 
After dinner, with the Brigade Band — the G. A. R. Band of 
Gettysburg— they marched to the depot to escort the other 
regiments of the Brigade, who came by way of Philadelphia. 

The Twenty-third Pennsylvania, Eighty-second Pennsyl- 
vania, Sixty-fifth New York, Headquarters and detachment of 
the One-hundred-and-twenty-second, left Philadelphia on a 
special train from Broad Street Station, 7.40 A. M., Tuesday, 
June 1 2th, with eight carloads of their survivors, ladies and 




SAMUEL WEEKS, 
Corporal Co. C 



•ENNSYLYANIA YOI.l'NTKKR INFANTRY. 319 



friends, and two combination cars, one loaded with commissary 
supplies, the other used as a lunch-room. The train was gaily 
decorated, while along the sides of the cars were long canvas 
streamers containing the regimental designations. 

The run was a most delightful one, through the thriving 
valleys of Lancaster and Cumberland, across the South Moun- 
tain. On reaching Harrisburg another car was coupled to the 
train, with the Allegheny contingent and squads from Marietta, 
York, Columbia and the National Capitol. 

To make it the more social and enjoyable, lunch, cigars, etc., 
were being passed continuously along the lines by the Com- 
missary Committee of the Twenty-third, who tried their level 
best to make everybody feel at home. Reaching Gettysburg 
about i P. M. they found the One-hundred-and-twenty- 
second New York, with their friends, drawn up in line, under 
the command of Colonel Silas Titus. After the customary 
salutations, with gripsacks in hand, they were escorted to their 
respective headquarters. 

The coming together at the stations on the morning of 
departure, the journey on the trains and the joining of the 
contingents from Syracuse and Philadelphia at Gettysburg, 
made up of the survivors and friends of the Brigade, was the 
renewal of old and beginning of new found friends, soon be- 
coming so well acquainted that they appeared as one large 
happy family. 

The Brigade Committee very wisely arranged no part of 
the programme for the afternoon of the day of arrival, as the 
ambition of everyone, especially on their first visit to the old 
burg, is to strike out on their own hook after dinner. So the 
afternoon was enjoyed in individual visits to the field, calls at 
the regimental headquarters, and the many points of attraction 
and interest around the battle-scarred town. The crowds of 
Gettysburg people at the station, on our arrival, and their calls 
at the hotels to have a hand shake, was a quiet manifestation 
of their welcome, which was fully appreciated by the visitors. 



Sl'O 



HISTORY UK THE TWENTY-THIKI) REGIMENT 



Camp-Tire. 

OX the evening of our arrival, Tuesday, June 12th, all assem- 
bled 730 P. M.at Brigade Headquarters, and marched to 
the Court House, which had been kindlv tendered bv the town 
authorities. The front part of the spacious room being 
reserved for the brigade veterans, ladies and friends. Soon 

the building was packed, not 
even standing room was left. 
Some 300 ladies were present 
to grace the occasion; and at 
8 P. M , Comrade William J. 
W'ray, Twenty-third Pennsyl- 
vania, of Philadelphia, who had 
been detailed as Master of 
Ceremonies, opened one of the 
happiest, enthusiastic, and en- 
joyable Camp-fires possible. 

The Chair, after returning 
thanks and congratulations 
upon the large attendance of 
the brigade and townspeople, 
stated that while they had 
printed programmes for all 
other of the Reunion Proceedings — Camp-fires were im- 
promptu affairs, and he was glad to announce of seeing enough 
talent present to keep the fire burning until after 24 o'clock ; 
but would try to maintain the good name of the brigade with 
closing the exercises at a seasonable hour, trusting those 
called upon would make their replies brief and interesting. 
That he was proud and glad to announce that among the 
distinguished officers of the brigade present, who honored the 
occasion, not only by his presence, but that of his entire family, 
was the General whom we all honored and loved, who com- 
manded the brigade in the action al Gettysburg, and was now 
the President of the Brigade Association, and il gave him 
great pleasure to introduce General Alexander Shaler. The 
General came to the front amid a perfect ovation, lasting 
several minutes. After returning his thanks for the warm and 
enthusiastic reception, in most feeling words, expressed his 
gratification of the assured successful Reunion, by the pres- 




]-KI< HKKK 



Serjeant Co. K. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 321 



enceof so many brigade veterans with their ladies and friends, 
and on behalf of the Brigade Association, warmly thanked 
the people of Gettysburg for their attendance. 

1'rofessor Frank Jay, the colored member of the Twentv- 
third Commissary Department, was then stood up, and made 
the old Court House ring with mirth by his " Kersand" comi- 
calities. He tried to get away with but one comic song, but 
the audience wouldn't have it; so he kept them laughing 
while he told all about the Kangaroo Garden, at Kalamazoo. 

Then Captain Robert W. Patrick, of the Kighty-second 
Pennsylvania, rendered the following poem, which he had 
composed while enroute on the train. 

"SHaler's Brigade at Gettysburg." 

Brave Comrades we have met once more, 

On this now sacred soil, 
To gaze on scenes, we saw before, 

And call to mind our toil. 

We hail you now as brothers dear, 

Who stood as true as steel, 
When other hearts were filled with fear, 

Such fears, you did not feel. 

But when amidst the cannon's roar, 

You heard the words " fall in," 
You promptly acted as of yore, 

With the same eager vim. 

We all remember those who fell, 

Amidst the battle's roar, 
Their glory shall forever shine, 

When time shall be no more. 

Let us recall to memory dear, 

Some scenes through which they passed, 

True men, who ne'er gave place to fear, 
And bravely died at last. 

Think of those scenes at Marye's Heights, 

Where many heroes bled, 
Brave Shaler led us in that fight, 

And gallant Spear fell dead. 

Remember Major Bassett, too, 

Who led you on to fight, 
Who, when the color bearer fell, 

Held up our flag in sight. 



322 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 

And boldly dashed across the bridge, 

And up the hill he led, 
And set our colors on the ridge, 

To wave above the dead. 

Think of the joy that filled our hearts, 

When on those heights we stood, 
When each had well fulfilled their parts, 

And every man felt good. 

We cannot stop to mark each scene, 

In which we bore a share, 
But only cast a sudden gleam, 

And for new scenes prepare. 

We well remember when we stood, 

On this same field before, 
When thousands drenched it with their blood, 

Amidst the cannon's roar. 

Think of the cheers that rent the air, 

When we had gained the day, 
And General Lee in full retreat, 

From that tremendous fray. 

Cold Harbor now looms in our sight, 

Where many met their end, 
Fell on our left, and on our right, 

Whose deeds we here commend. 

We never can forget those boys, 

Who fell in freedom's name, 
Amidst the carnage, and the noise, 

Death dealing smoke and flame. 

Hurrah for gallant Sheridan, 

Who led us in the fray, 
At Cedar Creek and Winchester, 

And with him gained the day. 

May he be spared, for many years, 

To friends and country too, 
And saved from death, and we from tears, 

And here I say adieu, 

After hearty cheers for the Eighty-second, the Chair stated 
that Onondaga County was present in force, and called upon 
Major T. L. Poole, of Syracuse, for something on behalf of 
the One-hundred-and-twenty-second New York, who responded 
in a most amusing way, telling of the trials and tribulations 



l'KWSYl V.WIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



323 



of " The Twosters " first introductory t<> the brigade, especially 
the greeting they met with at the Cross Roads, and most 
eloquently and feelingly spoke of the comradeship cemented 
in the field whilst brigaded. 

Then Comrade Bill (W. W.) Mayberry, of Philadelphia, 
set the entire audience wild with delight with his " Army 
Flea" rendition; and the shouting continued until he gave 
them his Sneezing Song — everybody was delighted — they 
couldn't help it. 

The Chair then stated that General John Cochrane who 
had been selected to act the part of brigade orator, was by 
reason of his physical disability compelled to be absent. That 
while they regretted very much the inabilitv of their once 
brigade commander to attend — the post of honor on to-mor- 
row's dedication would be filled by General Shaler, who had 
kindly consented to deliver the oration — he was pleased to 
state that Captain Robert H. Moses, One-hundred-and-tvventy- 
second Xew York, of New York City, was present with a 
copy of General Cochrane's farewell address to his old brigade 
in 1863, and introducing the 
comrade as one of the workers, 
of the reunion, who after a 
brief speech expressive of his 
feelings at the enjoyable time, 
proceeded to read the Gen- 
eral's address, which was 
loudly applauded at its finish. 

Sergeant William McEn- 
tee, of New York, of the Chas- 
seurs, Sixty-fifth New York, 
being called upon, after a brief 
address congratulatory of the 
occasion, sang one of the old 
Sixth Army Corps songs, in- 
voking loud applause. 

Capt. George W. Water- 
house, Eighty-second Pennsylvania, being called to the front, 
recited "The Soldier Tramp," which he ably rendered. The 
applause that followed brought him up again, this time recit- 
ing an amusing dialect, very much enjoyed. 




I HI IM VS I" IRSEY, 
Co. C 



324 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 

Then followed one of the happy events of the evening', by 
the Chair stating that he had a special message for the ladies ; 
and told that when the Twenty-third came to Gettysburg to 
dedicate their tablet in 1886, the chief of the Commissarv, who 
looked after their stores, as now, was the genial Comrade 
William H. Bantom. That the first news he received on arrival 
of the train at Gettysburg, was a telegram from his dear wife, 
"That it was a boy ; what will you name him?" It kind of 
paralyzed Bant, at first, but he recovered sufficiently to wire 
back, name him for his grandfather, the occasion, the General, 
and the family ; so the child was christened, Charles Gettys- 
burg Shaler Bantom. His comrades to show their affection 
for the father, had prepared a souvenir for the little one, and 
it gave him great pleasure to present on behalf of "The Sur- 
vivors' Association, Twenty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers," a 
solid " Silver Spoon," suitably engraved, encased in a unique 
and costly box, to the baby boy. The proud father came to 
the front amid laughter and clapping of hands, receiving 
the gift with appreciative thanks, promising to number it with 
the family heir-looms as one of their most precious tokens. 

As it was about time the ladies were heard from, Mrs. 
John Fox, of Philadelphia, was escorted to the platform, giving 
a recitation so ably rendered that she was recalled, and 
amused the audience with "The Regular Army Oh." 

The Hon. Samuel Collins, of Philadelphia, was prevailed 
upon to give his dialect songs ; so he sang an Irish, Dutch 
and old Plantation Melody, evoking hearty laughter and 
applause. 

Comrade William H. Redheffer, Secretary of the Eighty- 
second Pennsylvania Association, being called upon, having 
such a severe cold, contracted on the trip, he could not talk, 
handed in a paper to have read, which we take pleasure in 
giving insertion in this publication. 

The Chair then stated that Captain James M. Craig, one 
of the workers of the Twenty-third, who had looked after the 
Allegheny contingent, was present with his family, and called 
on his son, Master Eddie Craig, of Allegheny City, who de- 
livered in g 1 style, "Sue's Wedding." 

Professor Jay, whom we learned was quite a musician, 
gave a Cornet Solo, so pleasing that he had to repeat his 
" Home Sweet I !< mie.'' 



PENNSYLVANIA Y< ILUNTEER INFANTRY. 



325 



The Chair then announced that the Kink Building would 
be thrown " wide open " by the Twenty-third, immediately after 
adjournment, where all were invited to partake of their hospi- 
tality. Alter returning the thanks of Shalcr's Brigade to the 
town authorities for the use o] the Court House, the peopled 
Gettysburg for their large attendance and heartv welcome, 




THOIGHTS OK LOVED ONES AT HOME. 



with cheers upon cheers, amid the inspiring music of the G. A. 
R. Band, of Gettysburg, the happy Camp-fire closed. 

During the evening, the Twenty-third Commissary, passed 
buckets full of cold lemonade around every half hour. The 
audience found it quite refreshing. 

To sum it up, it was a most enjoyable occasion, every- 
body seemingly glad to have been there. 



326 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD kl.i.lMENT 



Visit to the Battlefield of tHe Second and 
THird Days' .Action 

AT 2 P. M. Wednesday, June 13th, carriages v/ere taken at 
Headquarters for a visit to the battlefield. Colonel John 
Long, of the Passenger Department Gettysburg Railroad, go- 
ing along as guide and lecturer ; the first stop was made at 
East Cemetery Hill, where a vivid description was given by 
Colonel Long, of the march northward of Lee's and Meade's 
armies. A review of the first day's fight, the scenes enacted 
at Cemetery Hill, on the night of the second, when Hayes' 
and Hokes' Confederate Brigades charged among the guns of 
Weiderick and Rickett's, and were driven back almost annihi- 
lated. The terrible infantry fighting at Culp's Hill, on the 
morning of the third, when the enemy were driven out from 
the works they occupied, which had been abandoned the night 
before by Geary's troops, who had been sent to the support 
of Sickel's. From this commanding position was had a view 
of the entire field from Big Round Top on the left, to Wolf's 
Hill at the right, and away off to Rommel's Farm, where was 
pointed out the Cavalry Shaft, the scene of the fight between 
Jeb Stuart and General Gregg, in which the rebel cavalry 
were sent South. Carriages were then taken, and the drive 
continued past Rickett's guns where brave Pennsylvanians 
fought hand to hand in saving them during the rush of the 
Louisiana Tigers. Here was pointed out where Carroll's Bri- 
gade came on the double-quick, and getting on the Hank of 
the Tigers, swept the field. As we ascend to Culp's Hill, 
Steven's guns are seen, which did so much execution during 
the charging at East Cemetery Hill. Passing along the line 
of Wadsworth's Division, we soon reached the position where 
the gallant New Yorkers, of Greene's Brigade, Twelfth Corps, 
repulsed the repeated attacks of Johnson's Confederates. This 
was where our brigade (Shaler's) went in, (our second position) 
relieving regiments, assisting in driving the Johnnies on the 
morning of the third, bevond the lines. The drive was con- 
tinued to McAllister's Mills,beyond which was the extreme right 
held by the brigade oi General Thomas 11. Will, of the Sixth 
Corps. Returning, we crossed the swale to the right of which 



PENNSYLVANIA V( ILUNTEER INFANTRY 



327 



Johnson's and Rhodes' Confederate Divisions, in three lines, 
charged six times and were repulsed each time. Six hundred 
dead Confederates were found in front of Culp's Hill, showing 
the desperate work done along the front of Geary's lines. At 
Spangler's Springs we stopped to taste of the waters, from 
which the wounded of both armies quenched their thirst on 
the night of the second, and early morning of the third. Driv- 
ing along the Baltimore Pike, we enter the National Cemetery, 
one of the finest laid out and well kept burial places of the 
Union dead, where lie some 3,000 of the comrades. Here we 
found Sergeant Holtzworth, formerly the genial guide of the 
battlefield, who, by reason of a paralytic stroke has abandoned 
that calling, and is now the Superintendent. At this point we 
found the Sixth Corps mark among the artillery that manned 
these heights. Continuing the drive, passing Zeigler's Grove; 
and along the Emmettsburg Road to the right of Sickel's line ; 
here was described the desperate fighting of the old Third Corps 
on the afternoon of the second, where Birney, Ward, Graham, 
Carr, and DeTrobiand struggled against the overwhelming at- 
tacks of Longstreet. Beyond, 
on the left and half a mile to 
the front, was pointed out 
where Berdan with his sharp- 
shooters attacked the advanc- 
ing columns of Hood ; check- 
ing him for forty minutes, 
which gave the Round Tops 
in possession of the Union 
forces. The drive was then 
continued past the Peach Orch- 
ard, the angle of Sickel's line, 
which was held so tenaciously 
by our troops ; " The Loop," 
through the woods to the 
famous Wheatfield.where Gen- Cap t. Co. i,™°™v S , 3™*™?™™. Killed 

1 r? 1 1 /-^ i 1 r^n* a t Bull Rum A.ug. 10, 1862, while Lt.-Col. 

eral Zook and Colonel Ellis, nth pi. Vol. infantry, 

of the Orange Blossoms were killed. Thence to the 
" Devil's Den," where the party alighted and were photo- 
graphed. While resting in the shade, under the camera, one 
could not help but recall the desperate work that raged 
around and amid these great boulders twenty-five years before ; 




328 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 

" and such boulders they are," piled upon each other, full of 
crevices, just the place a sharpshooter would be at home; 
and it was worked for all it was worth by the Johnnies during 
their stay, in picking off all that came under their fire on little 
Round Top. Passing through the Valley of Death across 
Plum Run, full of boulders of all sizes, between Little and Big 
Round Top, we ascend to the summit of the key to the posi- 
tion " Little Round Top." It was here that Warren, then 
Engineer Officer, on Meade's Staff, discovered the flank move- 
ment of Hood — that Hazlett, Colonel O'Rourke, Generals 
Weed and Vincent Strong, were killed in holding the position. 
The lecturer described the repulse of Longstreet, on the 
evening of the second day, pointing out across the Run, where 
the Pennsylvania Reserves charged ; Colonel Taylor, of the 
Bucktail's lost his life, and away off to the Werntz Farm, 
where (Buck) McCandless' Brigade halted in their charge, the 
night of the 2d. From here a grand view is had of the field ; 
some climbed up the ascent of Big Round Top, to the left of 
which where Farnsworth, of Kilpatrick's Cavalry, was killed 
leading his charging squadrons. Here was another 6th Corps 
Brigade (Russell's) holding the extreme left. 

The party was then driven down the slopes of the Tops, 
along the battlefield drive, passing the Headquarters of old 
General Sedgwick, the Commander of the Sixth Corps, in the 
clump of trees on the front line, to the right of Little Round 
Top, where his advance brigade — Nevin's — went in, just in 
time to assist in driving Longstreet back. To the rear of this 
where our brigade (Shaler's) lay (its first position) on arrival 
on the field, on the afternoon of the 2d. On reaching the 
left centre, a vivid description was given of the artillery duel 
on the afternoon of the third day, where one hundred and 
twenty guns of the Confederates and eighty of the Union ex- 
changed shots for nearly two hours — a prelude to the grand 
charge and magnificent repulse of Pickett's fourteen thousand. 
Here Hancock, Gibbon, Doubledav, Webb, Stannard, Hall, 
Brooks, Hayes, Harrow, Dana, Rowley, Arnold, Brown, Gush- 
ing and Cowan performed distinguished services. At this point 
is the Umbrella clump of trees ; along this front is known as the 
"high-water mark of the rebellion." Along the low stone 
wall lay the gallant Sixty-ninth Pennsylvania, of the Philadel- 
phia Brigade, who never left it (luring the charge, while to 



'ENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER [NFANTRY. 



329 



their right was the Fourteenth Connecticut, Fourth Delaware 
;md Twelfth New Jersey, who did such terrible execution. To 
the left of the clump of trees was pointed out where Stan- 
nard's Vermont Brigade advanced beyond the lines, and, 
wedged between the right and 
centre of Pickett's charging 
columns, and forming line of 
battle front and rear, took both 
lines on the Hank. Here we 
again found the Sixth Corps 
mark — that of Cowan's Bat- 
tery ; the brave Confederates 
coming so close to his guns 
that he used double-shotted 
canister at ten paces. In the 
fields, to the immediate left 
and rear, lay our brigade — 
Shaler's— (our third position) 
in support as the charge was 
broken. From here over on 
the Taneytown Road, in rear, 
was pointed out the old shell-stormed house, where General 
Meade had his headquarters during the action. As we near 
the town it was shown where the Eighth Ohio and troops from 
Zeigler's Grove got on the left flank of Pickett's charge, send- 
ing back Pettigrew's Division, badly demoralized. Thence 
past the battlefield hotel, where the sharpshooters held the ex- 
treme out-post of the Union line at the cemetery, during the 
second and third days ; past the house where Jennie Wade 
was killed while baking bread, on the evening of the first day's 
action, reaching the hotels in time for supper — dusty, tired, 
but well pleased with the trip around the field. 

The drive was an interesting one, giving the opportunity 
of viewing the many magnificent, unique and costly monu- 
ments erected along the lines, as well as one of instruction of 
the story of the action. 




JOHN LAPP, 
Corporal Co. C 



330 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



Complimentary Ball and Reception by the 

Twenty-tHird Pennsylvania Volunteers' 

Association in Honor of the Reunion 

AFTER supper, on the evening of Wednesday, the 13th, the 
G. A. R. Band, of Gettysburg, under the charge of Com- 
rade James Spence, of Philadelphia, were taken on a serenad- 
ing tour — visiting the newspaper offices of The Truth, The Com- 
piler, The Star and Sentinel, who had done so much in their 
columns to honor the event, in their many kind expressions 
concerning the brigade reunion — and thence to the Globe 
Inn, where the One Hundred and Twenty-second New York 
were quartered ; from there to the McClellan House, the head- 
quarters of the Sixty-fifth New York ; and then to the City 
Hotel, where the Eighty-second Pennsylvania made their home 
— back to the Eagle Hotel, headquarters of the brigade. At 
each place choice selections of music were tendered, as com- 
pliments of the Brigade Association. 

In the meantime, the McKnightstown Band, in charge of 
the Twenty-third Committee, were tendering the General a 
serenade, and comrades were calling upon him and visiting 
each other's headquarters — recounting the stories of old times 
and the many pleasantries of the reunion occasion — and at 9 
P. M. all wended their way from headquarters to the Rink 
Building, a large, commodious structure, where was being held 
the grand Complimentary Ball and Reception, tendered by the 
Twenty-third Pennsylvania, in honor of the event. The ball- 
room was appropriately decorated for the occasion, with two 
stages erected at opposite sides of the room, for the bands ; 
while, from the front of the building was a transparency, em- 
blazoned with the legend, "The Twenty-third Pennsylvania 
Welcomes Shaler's Brigade and their Friends." One hundred 
and fifty written invitations had been sent to the good people 
of Gettysburg, inviting " Yourseli and ladies" to the Camp- 
fire, the Dedication and the Complimentary Hall and Recep- 
tion, and when Colonel |ohn V . Glenn, as Grand Conductor of 
the Ball, led off in the (hand March, with his good wife, there 
followed at least twelve hundred people — some four hundred 
ladies being in the line; the G. .\. R. Band, of Gettysburg, 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



33] 




playing the dancing music while the McKnightstown Cornet 
Band gave the promenades, so that music was in the air at all 
times. An original, unique and very appropriate ball program 
was distributed, containing thirty six dames, wherein are the 
names of the regiments of tin- 
brigade, its winter camps, and 
actions in which it had parti- 
cipated were embraced, as a 
souvenir of the occasion ; the 
ladies receiving a specially 
decorated one in silken corded 
pencil and bow of ribbon. 
Everybody got one to carry 
home, while two thousand 
handsome programs proper, 
containing the dances and pro- 
menades, were passed around 
for use in the festivities. 

There was but one round 
of refreshments — but it was a 
continuous one, of ice-cream 
in all flavors, pound, sponge and other cakes, lemonade, etc., 
and it kept the volunteers to their Commissary Committee 
busy ; but they enjoyed it, all the same, to be permitted to 
cater to such guests. 

The dancing was kept up until midnight, the old and young 
joining in the festivities with mirth and zeal, it being expressed 
by the people of Gettysburg as one of the grandest and most 
enjoyable balls in the history of the town. Evervbody seemed 
to enjoy the occasion, from the General and his good wife, to 
the Secretary and his " little " daughter. 




GE( I. W. l-'K \l I \ 
Co. G. 



332 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD RKC.IMENT 



The following is a copy of the ball program souvenir : 

COMPLIMENTARY 

BALL AND RECEPTION 

OF THE SURVIVORS' ASSOCIATION 

TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT PENNA. VOLUNTEERS 

TO THE 

SURVIVORS OF SHALER'S BRIGADE 

(SIXTH CORPS) 

AT THE 

KINK BUILDING, GETTYSBURG, JUNE 13, 18SS. 



I. 


Grand March . 6th C 


orps — from Manchester 


to Gettysburg 


2. 


Quadrille 




Queens Farm 


3- 


Polka 




York town 


4- 


Lancers 




Williamsburg 


5- 


Glide and Schottische 




Fair Oaks 


6. 


New York City's Delight, 


"The Chasseurs," 65th N. Y. Vols. 


7- 


Octagon 


Charles 


City X Roads 



8. Polacca ..... White Oak Swamp 

9. Waltz — Danish .... Turkey Bend 

10. Varsouvienna ..... Malvern Hill 

11. Lawn Tennis ..... Chantilly 

12. Our Absent Friends, The 1st Long Island— 67th N. Y. Vols. 
1 3. Saratoga Lancers .... Fredericksburg 

14. Varieties ..... Mud March 

15. Redowa ..... Marye's I [eights 

16. Quadrille — Robinson .... Salem Church 

17. " " The Nation's Mecca" . . Gettysburg 
[8. Syracuse's Delight . . Our i22d New York Vols. 

19. Cotillion ..... Funkstown 

20. Virginia Reel .... Rappahannock Station 

21. Stephinie Gavotta ..... Mine Run 

22. Irish Jig . . . Brandy Station 

23. College Lancers .... Johnson's Island 

24. Shaler's Brigade Delight . . Another Reunion 

25. Mazourka ..... Wilderness 

26. Caledonian ..... Spottsylvania 

.'7. Polo .... Hanover Court House 

2.s. Plain ...... Cold Harbor 

29. Loomis Landers .... Petersburg 



PENNSYLVANIA V< (LUNTEER INFANTRY. 



333 



30. Philadelphia's I >elight 

31. Schottische 

32. Galop 

33. I [ighland Fling 

34. Medley 

35. All Hands Around 

36. The 23d Penn'a Vols. Delight, 



Old S2(l Pennsylvania Vols. 

Fort Stevens 

( (pequan 

Cedar Creek 

. Sailor's Creek 

Appomattox 

Hope all Enjoyed Themselves. 



PROGRAM PROPER OF THE DANCES AND PROMENADES 

AT THE BALL. 



< '.kanm March 

1. Quadrille 

Promenade 

2. Quadrille 

Promenade 

3. Quadrille 

Promenade 

4. Waltz 

Promenade 

5. Quadrille 

Promenade 

6. Waltz 

Promenade 

7. Ouadrille 

Promenade 

8. Waltz 

Promenade 

9. Ouadrille 

Promenade 

10. Waltz 

Promenade 

11. Ouadrille 

Promenade 

1 2. Galop 

Promenade 

Dancing Music 

Promenade Music 



INTERMISSION 



INTERMISSION 



Guard the Flag 

Riverdale. 
Minstrels. 

Landers. 
Erminie. 
. Schottische. 
. Merry War. 

Congress. 
Popular Airs. 

Leap Year. 
Gladiator March. 

Queen Anne. 
Mikado. 

Polka. 
Black Hussar 

Victor 
Fairest of the Fair. 

Plain. 
Falka. 

Ida May. 
Nanon. 
Landers. 
Trip to Africa. 

Amazon. 
Good Night. 

Gettysburg Band. 
McKnightstown Band. 



334 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



A Visit to the Battlefield of the First Day's 

Action 

AT 9 A. M., of Thursday, June 14th, carriages were taken 
again at brigade headquarters, for a visit to the scene of 
the first day's action, many tramping it all along the lines. 
At Barlow's Knob a description was given by Colonel 
Long, the guide and lecturer, from that portion of the 
field, showing the gap that existed between the left of 
the Eleventh Corps and that of the right of the First 
Corps, caused by the arrival of the Confederates, under 
Early, along the York Road, which threatened the extreme 
right and rear of the Eleventh Corps, necessitating the 
withdrawal of the entire line from that part of the field — 
the troops falling back through the streets of the town, secur- 
ing positions on Cemetery Heights ; the lecturer describing 
the terrible scenes enacted in the retreat to take up the rear 
position. Passing along the Mummasburg Road and along 
the lines to the Railroad Cut, where a Confederate brigade 
was corralled during the action and taken prisoners ; along 
these lines the Johnnies had an enfilading fire, but the old First 
held up their end until the right gave way. 

From there the party was driven to Oak Ridge, where 
raged the action of the First Corps. Here Reynolds, Mere- 
dith, Doubleday, Paul, Wadsworth, Custer, Hoffman, Fair- 
childs and others did such distinguished service. Thence, to 
Reynolds' Grove, where stands the monument erected bv the 
State of Pennsylvania, on the spot where her distinguished son, 
General John F. Reynolds, was killed. In this grove the Iron 
Brigade of Meredith, in the course of the engagement, cap- 
tured the Confederate brigade of Archer. Here Custer's 
Brigade and Hall's Battery were forced back to Seminary 
Ridge by the overwhelming numbers of Hill's Corps, where a 
new line was formed, Rowley's and Robinson's Divisions and 
the Bucktail Brigade, of Pennsylvania, distinguishing them- 
selves in holding it against repeated attacks. The drive was 
continued across Willoughby Run, where General Buford, 
with his cavalry, brought on the action of Gettysburg, fighting 
dismounted lor two hours against superior numbers, winning 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



335 



fur himself and command meritorious praise from the Com- 
manding General, for his gallant resistance to the advance of 
Hill's Corps of Lee's Army. This cavalry action and the 
stubborn resistance of the glorious old First Corps, under 
Reynolds, and that of the unfortunate Eleventh Corps, under 
Howard, gave the opportunity for the Army of the Potomac 
to concentrate on the lines the 
second and third day, that gave 
to the nation "Gettysburg." 

After a visit to the Springs, 
to enjoy the Katasalyn waters, 
the story being told of their 
discovery as medicinal proper- 
ties by wounded men crawling 
to the springs to bathe their 
wounds in the waters, we 
started back to town over the 
Chambersburg Road, passing 
the Seminary where General 
Lee made his headquarters, 
after the withdrawal of our 
troops to the Cemetery, until 
his army retreated back to Vir- 
ginia. Along the road was 
pointed out the fields over 
which the gallant First Corps, 
in well-preserved lines, fell 
back, fighting all the way, be- 
yond the town. Viewing the 
old whitewashed home of the 
late John Burns, the citizen of 
the town, who, while fighting on his own hook with the First 
Corps, received the wounds that caused his death. As we 
enter the town, houses are pointed out where the Confederate 
sharpshooters fired on the guns at Cemetery Hill, and the old 
Church Building, where the chaplain of the Ninetieth Pennsyl- 
vania Regiment was killed on its steps as he was about to enter 
to minister to the spiritual welfare of the wounded ; reaching 
our hotels in time to pack up gripsacks for the homeward trip. 

We found the dead in the National Cemetery at Gettys- 
burg, are buried in Sections of States : United States Regu- 




ELY MEDAL, 
Marye's Heights. 



336 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMEN" 



lars, 138; Connecticut, 22; Delaware, 15; Indiana, 80; Illi- 
nois, 6; Maine, 104; Massachusetts, 159; Maryland, 22; 
Michigan, 171 ; Minnesota, 52; New York, 867; New Jersey, 
78; New Hampshire, 49; Ohio, 131; Pennsylvania, 534; 
Rhode Island, 12; Vermont, 6i ; Wisconsin, "Ji\ West Vir- 
ginia, 1 1 ; unknown, 979. A massive monument, sixty feet in 
height, surmounted by the Goddess of Liberty, rises from the 
centre of the plot. It was erected by the National Govern- 
ment in memorv of its dead on the field. 




GEi IRGE F. PEIFER, 

Corporal ('". 1). Taken in 186a. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



337 



Homeward. 

THE One-hundred-and-twenty-second New York was the 
first to leave for home, taking the 9 A. M. train on 
Thursday, June 14th, quite a number of the boys going to the 
depot to give it a send-off. After many hand shakes, and 
promises to be with us on all future reunions of the Brigade, 
they bid adieu to Gettysburg, and after an uneventful but very 
enjoyable ride, they reached old Onondaga County and their 
home, Syracuse, on schedule time — a tired party of pilgrims, 
but rejoiced at their successful and enjoyable trip. 

Headquarters party, Sixty-fifth and One-hundred-and- 
twenty-second New York contingent, Eighty-second and 
Twenty-third Pennsylvania, departed on their special at 1 P. M., 
of the 14th, with many hand 
shakes and " come and see us 
again " from the good people 
of the town. Orders had been 
given for no dinner, and we 
were getting to feel quite hun- 
gry, when the Commissary 
Committee of the Twenty-third 
passed through the train with 
churns of hot coffee, iced milk, 
sandwiches, fruits, etc., boxes 
of cigars and lots of commis- 
sary, and it kept us busy get- 
ting away with the supplies, 
from the time we pulled out of 
Gettysburg until Broad Street 
Station, Philadelphia, was 
reached, as the Committee didn't seem to tire and their stores 
of hospitality were inexhaustible. 

The Brigade Committee held a meeting on the train, 
closing up all its affairs, and directed the Secretarv to compile 
all the proceedings of the reunion for publication in book 
form, and instructed General Shaler, as President of the Asso- 
ciation, to send a letter of thanks to the Twenty-third Penn- 
sylvania Association for their hospitality and soldierlv interest, 
so well manifested in the success of the brigade reunion. The 
sentiment on the train was that in the near future the Brigade 
should reune at home or on some of the other battlefields 




MATHEW SPENCE, 

Corporal Co. C 



338 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



and thus keep alive the comradeship of the survivors and 
friendship of our friends, which had been so enjoyable, 
renewed at our first reunion. 

The run was a delightful one, only one stop of five min- 
utes at Harrisburg, where our western contingent bid us good- 
bye, with the promise to be with us on the next occasion, 
reaching Philadelphia forty-five minutes ahead of time, like 
the "Twosters," a tired but one of the most happy parties of 
veterans and friends possible. 

The Twenty-third re-stocked the "Yorkers" with sup- 
plies, so as to bridge them over to their destination — Mrs. 
General Shaler being presented with a large pound cake to 
carry home to the grandchildren. Thus ended a most glorious, 
happy and decidedly successful reunion of Shaler's Brigade, 
in which all the commands contributed their share in the 
honors. 



■^JWASHINCTON 



BALTIMORE 




i O] OMAKN I : ON KOI. nil KS 

I i 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 339 



Letters and OtHer Documents Appertaining 
to the Reunion. 



Letter from Major-General II. G. Wright, late Commander c> t li 
Army Corps. Read at Dedication. 

Washington, June 7, 1888. ) 
1203 N Street, N. W. ) 
Dear General Shaler : 

Your kind invitation to be present at the meeting of the Survivors 
nf your brigade of the good < >ld Sixth at Gettysburg, on the 12th to 14th 
inst., gave me profound pleasure, and I should be glad to join vou on 
that occasion, and meet so many of the Survivors of the gallant Corps 
we all loved so well; but I am forced to accept the fact that my days for 
such undertakings are over, and that I must leave such Reunions to 
younger men who do not feel the weight of years bearing somewhat 
heavily upon them. 

As I cannot be with you, I must beg that you express to my old 
comrades my most hearty good wishes, not only for this occasion, but 
for all things connected with their welfare — good wishes which they 
have earned, not only from myself but from the country, by their gal- 
lant, efficient and successful services. 
I am my dear General, 

Very sincerely yours, 

H. G. WRIGHT. 
General Alexander Shaler, 

Ridgefield Park, N. J. 



Letter from Major-General John Newton, late our Division Com- 
mander. Read at Dedication. 

New York, May 26, 1888. 
My Dear General : 

It would give me great pleasure to be with your brigade in their 
celebration at Gettysburg, and I tender my best thanks for the cour- 
tesy ; but the fact is, I don't expect to be able to get out of the city at 
the date of the Reunion, which I would greatly enjoy. With best 
wishes for a glorious time, I am 

Very truly yours, 

JOHN NEWTON. 
General Alexander Shaler. 



340 



HISTORY OK THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



Letter from Major-General D. N. Couch, late our Division Commander. 

Read at Dedication. 

Norwalk, Conn., May 25, 1888. 
My Dear General Shaler : 

Very many thanks for the invitation to join the brigade in its Re- 
union at Gettysburg ; but, by reason of having made arrangements 
to be absent from home at the time, I cannot accept your kindness. 

Permit me, however, to wish for the Gallant Old Brigade, an en- 
joyable trip to the field of its former glories. 
With many good wishes, 

I am respectfully, 

I). N. COUCH. 
General Alexander Shaler, 



Ridgefield, N. J. 



Letter from General Martin T. McMahon, late Chief of Staff, 6th 
Corps. Read at Dedication. 

New York City, June 4, 1888. ) 
93 Nassau Street. \ 

Dear General : 

I would be only too glad to go with you to Gettysburg, and say 
a few words to the Survivors of your old brigade. No one knew better 

than I how much they did, and 
how well it was done. One of the 
best brigades in the Sixth Army 
Corps — having but two rivals as 
Brigade Organizations in what I 
may certainly be pardoned as de- 
scribing as the best Corps of the 
Army of the Potomac. Your brig- 
ade made a record which could in- 
spire even as dull a speaker as my- 
self almost to eloquence. It is not, 
therefore, the task of preparing an 
address suitable to the occasion, 
which deters me from accepting 
your kind invitation ; but, unfor- 
tunately, 1 am obliged to be in the 
city on the dates named for your 
Reunion bv engagements which 
1 cannot forego. 

When I refer to the Sixth Corps as the best Corps of the Army oi 
the Potomac; and, therefore, oi the best army oi theworld, I expect 
io heai from many oi our good brothers of the Second, the Fifth and 
the others, who will vigorously dispute the claim, and with such good 




I (i 1 1 \ 1 1 A 1 1 \ 
1 C. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. .".41 



reason that I fear posterity will have much difficulty in agreeing upon a 
verdict even if they take the trouble to consider the question. We 
will stand stubbornly by our own, however, and maintain as persist- 
ently with or without reason the supremacy of the < ireek Cross, whether 
of red, white, or blue, as we did in the days when Shaler's Brigade 
under Cochrane, yourself or dear Joe. Hamblin, bore it firmly to the 
front under more adverse circumstances, and met arguments that 
silenced, even if they did not convince, and held it there like men who 
deserved well of their country. 

( jod bless them allwho are with you, and God's peace to the souls 
of them whom you are there to honor. 
Faithfully vours, 

M. T. McMAHON, 

Chief of Staff, 6th Corps, 

Army of the Potomac. 
General Alexander Shaler. 



Letter of General Cochrane, declining to accept as Orator of the 

Day. 

To Shaler's Brigade Association, Survivors of the Sixth 
Army Corps : 

Cattlemen : 

I was apprised unexpectedly of my selection to address your Asso- 
ciation on the occasion of your Reunion on the field of Gettysburg, 
at a time when physical disorder forbade my acceptance of the proffered 
honor. 

Gettysburg battle, enshrined in the common heart, reflects a glory 
upon its humblest participant. Thither repair the pilgrims of freedom, 
and thither the pride and the hopes converge that illustrate the Ameri- 
can name. No record of man's design is needed to tell the story of 
that day, and when cenotaph and monument shall have crumbled to 
decay, still will its deeds stir and its echo thrill every American bosom. 
Here death assailed the hero and here deluged the ranks where shiftless 
and moanless thousands lay bleeding a sacrifice to country. And now, 
in the bloom of the vernal year, come the survivors of Shaler's Brigade, 
to recall the incidents of the deadly conflict they waged, and to sol- 
emnly dedicate mi muments to commemorate them. 

Though not suffered to share with them their perils, nor to partake 
of the glory that is theirs, yet must my heart be insensible, indeed, 
when Shaler's Brigade shall fail to remind me that it was once my own, 
and life's current have ebbed when its deeds and its destiny, its living 



342 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 

and its dead, are no longer borne on the tables of memory. Comrades, 
it was a sore day when, in time of war, bodily distress dictated to you 
my farewell address. Equally sore is the day when bodily infirmities 
restrain me from your peaceful Reunion. 

The glory anticipated for you then you have reaped, and " your 
victories past were in hail of your victories to come," for your stand- 
ards are gilded with the name of Gettysburg. Comrades, adieu. 

JOHN COCHRANE, 
Brigadier-General U. S. Vols. 
New York, June 4th, 1888. 



Letter from General Elisha H. Rhodes, of the Gettysburg 
Battlefield Association. 

Providence, R. I., June n, 1888. 

W. J. Wray, Sec'y, cS:c. 

Dear Comrade : 

I regret exceedingly that I shall be unable to attend the services 
held by the survivors of Shaler's Brigade, at Gettysburg. I remem- 
ber the days of old, when this brigade was a near neighbor of mine, 
and have not forgotten their deeds of valor in defence of the old flag. 
Please remember me to General Shaler and Comrades, and accept my 
thanks for the invitation. 

Yours very truly, 

ELISHA H. RHODES. 

2d. R. I. Vols. 



General Cochrane's Farewell Address ; read at the Camp-Fire, 
by Captain Robert M. Moses, u.'d New York Volunteers. 
Headquarters First Brio auk, 3RD Division, 6th Army) 
Corps, Army 01 Potomac. February 27, 1863. } 

Soldiers oj I he First Brigade: 

My command over you has terminated. Serious phvsical mala- 
dies, induced by the unaccustomed experiences of two yearsof military 
life, constantly in the camp, on the march, or in the field, have untitled 
me for the duties of an active campaign. 

For this reason my resignation severs my connection with the 

bul I should trample upon the mosl sacred emotions did I 

depart from among you in silence, Y\Y began our march and have 

traversed our fields together; when we lay down one sky covered. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



343 



and one flag protected us ; and when we arose, it was to the notes of 
the same reveille. Your toil has been my toil, and your battles 
mine. To Fair Oaks, Malvern Hill, Antietam, Williamsport and 
Fredericksburg, our memories revert together, as to the fields hallowed 
by the bravery and the blood of 
our Brigade. Soldiers' graves are 
there, filled with our dead, ami we, 
their survivors, bear their names 
upon our hearts, where too, their 
praises are inscribed. 

Soldiers, for your country 
have you borne all, perilled all, 
suffered all ; and for that country 
you will still bleed and endure, till 
you have seized from the teeth of 
this monstrous rebellion the dear 
inheritance of your children — one 
name, one country, one home. 

I shall not be with you, nor 
shall I strike at your side. But 
whenever, in other fields, bending 
beneath orievous burdens, I am 




PHILIP STENGEL, 
Sergeant Co. A. 



weary or faint, one thought of you, brave hearts, shall revive resolu- 
tion and re-invigorate effort in our common cause. 

You are of the Army of the Potomac. High hopes rest upon 
you, and fervid prayers supplicate your success. Objects of hope, 
and subjects of prayer, comrades in arms, your future is fraught 
with the destinies of the coming generations. Though sometimes 
checked, yet never defeated ; though sometimes baffled, yet never 
beaten, the victories of your past are still within hail of your victories 
to come ; your country's cause rests upon your arms, and your 
standards will yet gild the day of its success. 
Soldiers — Farewell. 

JOHN COCHRANE, 
Brig. -General, Comd'g ist Brigade. 



Remarks of William H. Redheffer, Secretary of 82d Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteers, at the Camp-Fire. 
Comrades of Shaler s Brigade: 

When a proper history of the grand old Army of the Potomac, 
of its many severe struggles, marches and hard fought battles, to get 
possession of its great objective point — Richmond — and the heroic 



344 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



deeds of its valorous commanders and soldiers, shall have been 
written, no one name of that galaxy of heroes will stand out brighter 
or more prominent than that of George Gordon Meade. 

That grand old army that was so often out-generaled, and whose 
commanders were so often out-manceuvred, but whose soldiers were 
never whipped. You all remember the Peninsula Campaign, under 
that (then) ideal of the army, McClellan, with our marches and 
counter-marches, fatigues, hardships and battles, and our many 
reverses, and yet the old army was never defeated, discomfited or dis- 
couraged. These to be succeeded by the Maryland Campaign, under 
the old commander, McClellan, with Antietam and the various other 
victorious battles — to be succeeded in turn by Burnside and the 
reverses at Fredericksburg, and the "Mud March," with the toils, 
hardships and privations incident to those campaigns ; and then 
"Fighting Joe" Hooker, with Chancellorsville, Marye's Heights and 
Salem Church ; to be followed by the second invasion of Maryland and 
the penetration of the loyal soil of our own State of Pennsylvania. You, 
comrades of the old " Shaler's Brigade," remember how, in the latter 
part of June, 1S63, while on the march, we were informed of the dis- 
placement of Hooker and the substitution of that grandest of all our 
commanders, General Meade, to the command of our grand old army. 
You remember, too, the grumblings and feelings of disappointment 
and distrust amongst the rank and file at the placing of, as we then 
thought, a new man at the head of the army, and one who was then 
comparatively unknown beyond the limits of his own (Fifth) Corps. 

The first day's fight at Gettysburg, the fall of that gallant soldier, 
Reynolds, and the sending for our Division Commander Newton to go 
to the front, to take Reynolds' place, in command of his Corps, are 
still fresh in your minds. You remember, also, the night march of 
the first day of the fight, to reach the field of battle in time to take 
part therein. Wherever the nation most needed a soldier, there some 
of the grand old Sixth Corps were sent. 

After our victory here at Gettysburg, then the charge at Funks- 
town, and the driving of the rebels from our soil, and the ending of 
the Pennsylvania Campaign. None of us who took part in that battle 
knew of the anxious days in Philadelphia, Washington, Baltimore and 
New York, nor of the many sleepless nights passed by the people of 
those cities during that time ; and not until it was known by them 
that the grand old invincible Army of the Potomac was confronting 
Lee and his host-, was confidence restored. 

This victory at Gettysburg was tin- first step in the disruption and 
downfall of the so-called Southern Confederacy. After that the old 
foe of our army fought on the defensive. No more offensive cam- 
paigns ; no mote invasions of Pennsylvania or Maryland were 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



345 



attempted bythem. To have lost .it Gettysburg meant the imperilling 
and possible capture of Washington, Philadelphia, Baltimore and per- 
haps New York City, and the reorganization of the Southern Con- 
federacy by Foreign Powers. These catastrophes would have pro- 
longed the war for wars and left the end in doubt. Of course, this is 
mere conjecture or speculation, but it is the sort of thing indulged in 
in everyday life, and is pardonable here. 

General Meade was, to my mind, the greatest soldier and General 
that ever commanded our old Army of the Potomac. He was a soldier 
by instinct and education ; one of sound judgment and good, hard 
common sense. You must remember that the battle of Gettysburg, 
the best fought and must decisive in results of the war, was fought 
within less than one week after he had assumed command of the army. 
We were on the march for somewhere, wherever Lee's army might be. 
But where were they? That was the question. Like the true soldier 
that he was, Meade took command, and within less than one week 
thereafter, fought the hardest battle of the war, with the most glorious 
results. General Meade was no hurrah soldier ; he was a soldier in 
the strongest acceptation of the term : and I do not wish to detract 
from the merits of any of the other heroes of the war when I repeat 
that to my mind — a soldier in the ranks — he was the greatest strategist, 
tighter and soldier that ever com- 
manded our army. There have 
been other claimants for the honor 
i if having selected the position for 
the battle of Gettysburg, and some 
have boldly asserted that Meade 
had nothing to do with it, while- 
others, in their claim, would almost 
make one think that Meade wasn't 
in the fight at all ! 

When Meade took command, 
our army was acting on the defen- 
sive. We were after our old foe, 
Lee ; but where he was at, that 
time, no one knew. Therefore, 
Meade was obliged to move cau- 
tiously and feel his way gradually. 
But, when Buford discovered the 
enemy's whereabouts, and the gallant Reynolds, soldier-like, obeyed the 
soldier instinct and marched his column toward the sound of the guns, 
and fell, covered with glory — then Meade knew where Lee was, and 
immediately ordered his entire army to the scene of conflict, Gettys- 
burg. His instructions to Hancock, of July ist, were, "That you 




CHA 



346 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REC.IMENT 



proceed to the front, and by virtue of this order, in case of Reynolds' 
death (as reported) you assume command of the Corps there 
assembled , " and he further said, " In case the ground and position 
are better for a fight than the one heretofore selected (Pipe Creek), 
you will advise me and I will order all the troops up. ' ' Hancock re- 
ported, and Meade ordered all the troops up at once and arrived on 
the field in person shortly after midnight. Now, if General Meade 
did not select the site for that battle, who did? Surely, no one will 
argue but that as General Commanding he could, after the first day's 
fight, have withdrawn the army to Pipe Creek or elsewhere, if he so 
chose, and fought his battle. Meade's instructions to Hancock cannot 
be mistaken or misunderstood, read them as we will. He said, "If 
you think the ground and position (at Gettysburg ) a better one on 
which to fight a battle * * * so advise me, and I will order all 
the troops up." If he had not intended to give battle to the 
enemy, wherever he found him, with advantages always in our favor, 
wouldn't he have ordered a- retreat, even after Hancock's report, and 
fought on ground of his own selection ? Most assuredly. 

Meade intended to fight, not retreat ; and he fought with results 
well known to us all. And the future historian, in reviewing the many 
battles of the Rebellion, and the soldiers that participated therein, 
will, I feel satisfied, accord to General Meade the full merit and praise 
that he earned, and to which he is so justly entitled. 

I have always believed that Divine Providence had much to do 
with the selection of General Meade as our commander at that battle. 
We could have afforded and did suffer reverses in many of our other 
battles without serious effect, but supposing we had been defeated 
there ! then what ? 

I have no words of condemnation or censure, nor do I say it in a 
spirit of fault-finding, but I think a mistake was made in not naming 
General Meade for the Lieutenant-Generalship. I don't say this out of 
any disrespect, or to detract from the laurels of the soldier that was 
named for that position — for I consider him one of the ablest of our 
generals. That Meade was a great and safe soldier, thoroughly effi- 
cient and competent in every respect, was attested to by General 
Grant himself, in retaining him as Commander of the Army of the 
Potomac. 1 le ably aided and seconded Grant in his plans and cam 
paigns, which culminated in the defeat of Lee's army, and the oxer- 
throw of the Rebellion; and if he had not been a true soldier, 
Grant would not have tolerated him lor a moment. And the strongest 
argument that I can make in support of my assertion of the slight put 
upon Meade, is this action of Grant's in retaining him in command of 
our army, as lie did, 

After a while, those who follow after us w ill write a correct history 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INI AN \l<\ . 



ol our deeds, without fear, favor or affection and without passion or 
prejudice. Then I am satisfied that full justice will be done the name 
of General Meade, and his name will stand out boldly in the front 
rank with the other heroes of the Union armies that took part in the 
war of the Rebellion. 

The gatherings of old soldiers, on old battlefields, should be 
encouraged, not only by the sol- 
diers who took part in them, but 
by the people at knee, as they 
serve to keep alive the old fraternal 
feelings between old comrades in 
arms, and stimulate the rising gen- 
eration to emulate the example of 
their sires, and fosters and kindles 
in the breast of the young a proper 
spirit of patriotism and love "t 
country ; so that in the future, 
should our country' s life ever again 
be imperilled, they will spring to 
her defense with the same spirit 
and as gallantly as did their fathers 
before them. 

Comrades, some of us who 
met here upon this occasion may, 
perhaps, never attend such another gathering. We are getting old and 
others must take our places. Let our actions be such that we would 
have our children emulate them. Let us do no act or say one word 
the recital of which would wound the feelings of others, or cause pain 
to ourselves. Let our everyday lives be living examples of probity, 
honor and rectitude for our children and our children's children. 

Comrades, I am done. That God, in His infinite wisdom, may 
guide us all in the future as He'has in the past, is my earnest prayer. 
Good night! 




WILLIAM A. FOWLER, 
Co. A. 



SUE'S WKDDING. 

READ AT CAMP-FIRE BY MASTER EDDIE CRAIG, OF ALLEGHENY CITY, PA. 



Sue ought to have been married a longtime ago. That's what 
everybody says who knows her. She has been engaged to Mr. 
Travers for over three years, and has had to refuse lots of offers to go 
to circuses with other young men. 

I have wanted her to get married so that I could live with her and 
Mr. Travers, and when I think if it hadn't been for a mistake I made 



348 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 

yesterday, she would have been married, I feel it awfully hard to be 
resigned, but we should always be resigned to anything we can't 
help. 

Before I go any further, I want to tell you about my printing- 
press. It did belong to Tom Maginness, but he got tired of it and let 
me have it real cheap. He was going to get it exchanged for a bicycle, 
a St. Bernard dog and twelve good books, but he finally consented to 
let me have it for $1.50. It prints beautifully, and I have made S3.75 
already, printing cards for the neighbors. 

I thought Tom and I might have a show some time, so I sent to 
town and bought some yellow paper, and some type, more than an 
inch high. 

It was decided that Sue would be married next week, and you 
should have seen the state of mind her and mother were in. They clici 
nothing but sew and buy clothes and talk about the wedding all day 
long. Sue said she wanted to be married in the church, and have 
bridesmaids and flowers and music till you couldn't rest, and the only 
thing that troubled her was who to invite. Mother wanted her to in- 
vite Mr. and Mrs. McFadden and the seven McFadden girls; but Sue 
said they had insulted her, and she couldn't bear the idea of inviting 
the McFadden tribe. All agreed that old Mr. Wilkinson, who came 
to a party at our house with one shoe and one slipper on, could not be 
invited, but that all others who were on good terms with the family 
should have an invitation. 

Sue counted up all she meant to invite, and there were nearly three 
hundred of them; and the worst of it was that Sue said I must deliver 
all the invitations myself. Now, you see, I couldn't do that without 
losing time, which is always valuable; so I thought of a plan which 
would save Sue the trouble of addressing three hundred imitations, 
and the trouble of delivering them. 

I got to work, with my printing-press, and printed a dozen 
splendid big l>ills about the wedding? Then I <ut some pictures of 
animals and ladies on horses out of some "Id circus bills I had and 
pasted them around the edge. That night I made some paste in an 
old tin pail and went out and pasted the bills in good places, all over 
the town. 

The next day lather came in, looking very stern, with one of the 
wedding bills in his hand. He handed it to Sue, and said, "Susan, 
what does this mean? These- bills arc- pasted all ovei the town, and 
crowds of people are reading them." Sue read it, gave a shriek, and 
fainted away, ami I wen) down to the posf office to see if there was any 

ni.nl there. This was what was nil the wedding bills, and I am sine it 
was spelled all righl 




23D P. V. CAMP GRAHAM, 
Company Street During the Festival Week— 1861. 



!49 



350 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 

MISS SUSAN BROWN 

announces that she will marry 

MR. JAMES TRAVERS, 

at the church, on Thursday, at 7 o'clock. 

All the friends of the family 

with the exception of 

the McFadden tribe and old Mr. Wilkinson 

are invited. 

Come early and bring Lots of Flowers. 

Now, what's wrong about that? I'm sure it was all spelled right, 
with the exception of the name of the church, and 1 didn't put that 
in because I wasn't sure how to spell it. 

Any other girl but Sue would have been grateful and thanked me 
for my trouble; but she began to cry, and said that she would go to 
New York to be married, for she couldn't be married in town after 
that boy's dreadful conduct. 

The worst of it is, that I am to be sent to a boarding-school ; 
and all because I pasted up a few bills without first asking my sister 
how she wanted them printed. 



Telegram to General Philip Sheridan. 

The boys did not forget their loved "Chief" amid the festivities, 
and wired the following telegram to his sick-chamber : 

Gettvsbur<;, June 13th, 1888. 
Colonel Mike Sheridan, 

Washington, D. C. 
Shaler's Brigade, of the old Sixth Corps, in Reunion on the 
Gettysburg Battlefield, tender their kind regards and heartfelt sym- 
pathy to their old commander, General Sheridan. 

WM. J. WRAY, Secretary. 



Letter from Major J. B. Davis, t22d New York Volunteers. 

Hot Springs, Ark., fune 6th, [888. 

My Dear ( omradt : 

I sent you a telegram a lew days ago, that 1 could not come to 
join with my old associates and discharge the duty assigned to me in 
tin dedicatory exercisi ia1 Gettysburg. It was the hardest task 1 ever 



PENNSYLVANIA V< >LUNTEER INFANTRY. 



351 



had imposed upon me, and nothing but my weakened physical condi- 
tion prevented me from going. I so long to be with you on that occa- 
sion and to see, perhaps for the last time, some of the dear old 
" twosters" who were with me in that fight ! But I shall not see them. 
1 shall not grasp their friendly 
hands nor look into their kindly 
faces again on earth. It may be, 
if my health is regained, that I 
shall be able to see you, or some 
of vou, at least, at the annual Re- 
union on August 28th — but this 
is in the future. 

I shall be with vou in spirit in 
all your gatherings, and go 
through your exercises, enjoy your 
sallies of wit and songs of mirth, 
and I desire to have you to say to 
all the members of my old regi- 
ment especially ', and to all in the 
regiment who remember me, that 
my heart just shakes hands with 
them all. The years glide by and 




GOTTLIEB STAIGER, 
Corporal Co. C. 



the last roll-call will soon come to each one of us. May your meeting 
be a grand success. I hope our monument stands on that big rock 
where the ravine begins. Please send me a map of the ground — a 
rough sketch, showing it all, with location of monument. Oh ! I 
regret that I cannot be with you on this grand occasion. It seems I 
must go ! but there is no use. I am so weary — I yield to the call for 
rest. God bless all my dear old comrades. Fraternally yours, 
A. H. Hubbs, J. B. DAVIS. 

President Survivors' Association, i22d N. V. Vols. 



RESOLUTION BY THE LADIES. 
At a meeting of the ladies who attended the Reunion, in the par- 
lors of the Eagle Hotel, on Wednesday evening, Mrs. General Shaler 
presiding, the following resolution was unanimously adopted : 

Resolved, That we unite in most heartfelt thanks our appreciation 
of the many courtesies extended to us by the survivors of Shaler' s Bri- 
gade and their friends, which have made our visit with you, in your 
Monumental Dedication and Reunion occasion, such a pleasant and 
happy event. MRS. GENERAL SHALER, President, 

MISS EMMA W'RAV, Secretary, 
MRS. J. MOFFITT, Assistant Secretary. 



352 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



REUNION CLIPPINGS 

£>■ FROM .£> 

The Fayetteville "Recorder," of New YorH, " TrutH," 

"Compiler," "Star" and "Sentinel," of Gettysburg, 

and Individual Contributors. 

The editor of The Truth, in getting out an extra edition, 
showed considerable enterprise. The report was quite a re- 
view of the Reunion. We congratulate such energy. 

The Compiler and the Star and Sentinel, of Gettysburg, 
gave a very interesting, readable account of the Reunion. 

The Eagle, McClellan, City and Globe Inn, at Gettys- 
burg, were used as the headquarters of the several commands. 
All report the accommodations par excellence. 

On the arrival of the train bringing General Shaler, the 
following additional friends of the i22d joined the party: 
Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Slauson, Miss Slauson, Miss Nellie 
Slauson, Miss Carpenter and Mr. and Mrs. P. M. Wilson, of 
New York City, Mr. and Mrs. Heintz and Mr. J. L. Loomis, 
of Philadelphia, Pa., and Mrs. Guy Moses, Miss Gaylord and 
Mr. Z Moses, of Washington, D. C. 

The efficient services rendered by the Committee having 
charge of the selection and location of the monument of the 
i22d New York and the arrangements for the excursion, and 
especially the zeal and efficiency of Colonel O. Y. Tracy, who 
devoted his services and money freely to promote the under- 
taking, are gratefully remembered by the comrades, who de- 
sire us to give expression to this feeling. 

Colonel John F. Glenn, of Philadelphia, the Grand Con- 
ductor of the Hall, knows when he has good music, and quick- 
lv decided to swap bands, in order that the dancers could 
enjoy the maze. 

The 122(1 New York were drawn up in line on arrival of 
the other regiments of the brigade, under the command of 
Colonel Silas Titus, and as (he column passed by, with ladies 
on their arms and gripsack in hand, gave them a marching 

salute. 



PENNSYLVANIA V( >LUNTEER INFANTRY. 



Captain R. H. Moses, of New York City, who has acted 
as ilif representative of the i22d on the committee of arrange- 
ments for the brigade Reunion, devoted much time to the 
affair, earningthe congratulations of his comrades for the suc- 
cessful result. His interest in the old regiment and all that 
concerns it seems to increase with the advance of time. 

Two new faces, which have been missing from our annual 
reunions, were seen at Gettysburg, and the cordial welcome 
they received must convince them that the fraternal feelings 
engendered by the experiences of army life grow stronger as 
years go by. We refer to Captain Lucius Moses and Ser- 
geant Charles Eldridge. 

William J. Wray, the efficient Secretary of the Brigade 
Association, was the leading spirit of the Reunion, and 
the success of the reunion is largely due to his efforts, both 
in the work of preparation and in the subsequent supervision 
of the same. The i22d boys were shown many favors by 
him and his associates, which 
they will remember with grati- 
tude. 

The popular President of 
the 82d Pennsylvania Asso- 
ciation, Colonel John M. 
Wetherill, of Pottsville, and 
their energetic Secretarv, Wil- 
liam H. Kedheffer, of Phila- 
delphia, were each presented 
with a handsome Sixth Corps 
badge — red enamel, with 
words, " 82d P. V." — by the 
Survivors' Association, 8 2d 
Pennsylvania Volunteers ; a 
most deserving tribute, as 
both worked very hard in 
their efforts to make the Re- 
union a success. 




ROBT. C. NEWBURG, 

Sergt. -Major ist Battalion, ist New Jersey 

Cavalry. Co. B 23d P. V. 

Three months' service. 



General Shaler must have been touched with the hearty 
reception accorded him by the members of his old command. 
Every mention of his name was greeted with hearty cheers, 
and whenever he appeared he was tendered a perfect ova- 



354 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



tion. He will always be regarded with respect and esteem 
by the veterans of his old brigade, who always admired 
and trusted him. He was to them an ideal hero and com- 
mander. 

The members of the i22d were, during their stay at Get- 
tysburg, the recipients of many courtesies and attentions from 
the 23d Pennsylvania, which they desire to gratefully acknowl- 
edge. 

It was indeed a very happy thought of General Shaler to 
suggest a Reunion of the old Brigade, and the spirit in which 
the reorganization of the old commands began demonstrated 
how strong the ties of comradeship existed these many years ; 
for, within ten months after the call was sounded, the com- 
rades were brought into their several regimental associa- 
tions. Many were found residing in nearly all the States, and 
on June 12th, the monuments were erected, ready for the dedi- 
cation. 

The elements were even with us in the celebration, 
as three more desirable days could not have been selected 
if the committee had been given the entire calendar to choose 
from. 

It was a great disappointment to all who were present 
at the Reunion, that Major J. B. Davis, of the 12 2d, who 
was severely wounded at Culp's Hill, was unable to come 
on account of illness. How sadly disappointed the Major 
was himself is told in his letter, which we take great pleasure 
in publishing. 

Colonel John F. Glenn, of the 23d Pennsylvania Volun- 
teers, with about fiftv of the survivors of the regiment with 
their wives, on Wednesday made a special tour of live hours 
over the battle field, under the guidance of that popular 
and efficient guide, Captain James T. Long, who gave them 
a general description of the three days' battle from three dif- 
ferent points, namely, Cemetery Hill, Round Top anil the 
Bloody Angle. 

Among the visitors that we met in Gettysburg this week 
were H. Willis Bland, Esq., a well-known Reading lawyer, 
and a member of the 826 Pennsylvania Regiment, and Mr, 
|. C. Aitken, of Philadelphia. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFAN I k\ 




A party of eight, belonging to the Reunion visitors, met 
with an accident that might have been serious, on Wednesday 
evening, while returning from a trip over the field. As the 
two-horse vehicle in which they were seated arrived on the 
top of Baltimore Hill, the right 
hand spindle on the rear axle 
broke. Down went the con- 
veyance, turning completely 
over, and throwing all the oc- 
cupants out on the street. 
Strange to say, all escaped un- 
hurt, with the exception of 
one, whose shoulder was pain- 
fully bruised. The latter was 
Comrade George Slaysman, 
a member of the 23d Pennsvl- 
vania Regiment. 

General Shaler and his 
party arrived here on Tuesday 
afternoon He was accom- 
panied by his wife, Colonel 
William DeC. Boughton, Major C. H. Tucker and Colonel John 
B. Woodruff, of New York ; Colonel John Oakey, of Brooklyn, 
ex-District Attorney of Kings County ; Colonel Samuel 
Truesdell and Samuel Truesdell, Jr., of Brooklyn ; Colonel 
G. W. Ford, Mrs. Matthew Shaler, Mrs. Colonel Jussen and 
Mrs. Fred Grow. On their way here the party spent Monday 
night at the Continental Hotel, in Philadelphia, and a mem- 
ber of the old brigade staff said to a reporter of the Times, 
of that city : " We thought we would go up to Gettvsburg a 
little ahead of the twenty-fifth anniversary of the battle, which 
occurs next month, and have a little Reunion before the 
crowd gets there. The Reunion will take place on the field. 
There will be between forty and fifty thousand people at Get- 
tysburg on the twenty-fifth anniversary of the battle, and there 
wouldn't be much room for us to hold a Reunion there on 
account of the crowds." 

After leaving Harrisburg, while on his way to Gettysburg, 
on Tuesday, with the Survivors of Shaler's Brigade, Mr. 
George Dougherty, of Philadelphia, a member of the 23d 



WM. H, BANTOM, 
Co G. 



356 HISTORY OF THK TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



Pennsylvania Regiment, met with a rather serious mishap. 
One of his comrades tripped over a box in the lunch car, 
where there were no seats, and was thrown against a win- 
dow, his elbow going through the glass. In his fall he also 
struck Mr. Dougherty, and the latter was thrown back 
against the broken glass, cutting an artery in the neighborhood 
of his collar bone. The profuse bleeding was stopped by 
compression, the injured man's comrades taking turns in 
holding their thumbs on the orifice with a compressed 
handkerchief. Dr. Roller, the old surgeon of the regiment, 
was on the train, and he telegraphed from one of the way 
stations to Dr. T. T. Tate, of this place, asking him to be in 
readiness on the arrival of the train. Dr. Tate did so, and 
took Mr. Dougherty under his charge, administering the nec- 
essary surgical attention, the injured man was able to be out 
again on Wednesday. 

The Commissary Gang of the Twenty-third Pennsylvania 
Volunteers captured quite a squad of the Eighty-second at the 
Vineyards. After cracking several botts of grape-juice, they 
were paroled and went on their way rejoicing. 

Professor William Malcolm, of Philadelphia, the mineralo- 
gist, brought home several specimens for his cabinet. Prof. 
Sheely, of Gettysburg College, gave an exhibition of his valu- 
able collection. We tried bricks and cobble-stones on Male, 
but he knew them on sight. 

The flag used to veil the One Hundred-and-Twenty-second 
monument was loaned for the occasion by Mrs. O. V. Tracy, 
who cherishes it as a valued relic of her lamented father. The 
flag was presented by the War Department to Hon. Charles 
B. Sedgwick, then Onondaga's representative in Congress and 
Chairman of the Committee on Naval Affairs. Mrs. Tracy 
was also a cousin of our beloved commander. General John 
Sedgwick. 

Secretary William J. Wrav, of Slialcr's Brigade, is a courte- 
ous gentleman to whose efforts much of the Reunion's success 
was due. He labored early and late in ils interest, but not 
without results that he may well feel proud of. lb' was pre- 
sented, while here, with a gold pin in the shape ol a .Sixth 
Corps badge, with the name of his regiment, the Twenty-third 
Pennsylvania Volunteers, inscribed thereon. 



I'l NNSY] VANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



357 



The Camp-Fire was one ol the happy events of the occa- 
sion. The old Court House was neverso crowded before with 
so many cheerful faces, made so by the laughable incidents 
and enjoyments of the talent dispensed, each of the commands 
contributing its best to entertain. 

The dedication was complete in all its details. The march 
to the ground in organization, the great crowds of townspeople 
in attendance, the historical and eloquent addresses at each of 
the monument dedications, with the other impressive and ap- 
propriate ceremonies, was the crowning feature of the celebra- 
tion — highly creditable to the brigade. 

Captain Moses' contingent, of the One-Hundred-and- 
Twenty-second, came in from New York Citv and Washing- 
ton, and were a pleasant party of ladies and gentlemen ; among 
the number beini; the Captain's mother and Mr. Slauson, his 
business partner. 

The Twenty-third Pennsylvania's hospitable supplies were 
inexhaustible ; lunch, cigars, etc., were continually passed 
through the train, going and returning, as well as at the Camp- 
Fire and its Ball. In tact, at 
all times the cry was, " Come 
and help yourself," and if you 
didn't, the Commissary would 
help you. 

We met General Shaler, 
with the ladies of his party, at 
the Vineyards. The cool, un- 
fermented wine was quite re- 
freshing. 

The only regret of the trip 
was the absence of the First 
Long Island May they so ar- 
range as to join with us on all 
future occasions. 

John M. Huber, Esq., the 
druggist, of Gettysburg, was of 
valuable assistance in looking after many of the details on be- 
half of the brigade, for which we heartily thank him. His 
brother Frederick was killed in action, at Pair Oaks, while 
serving as ist Sergeant, F Company, Twenty-third Pennsyl- 




JOHX McCABE. 
Corporal Co. C 



358 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 

vania, being the first Union soldier from Gettysburg killed in 
the war. 

The thanks of the brigade are tendered the Rev. H. \Y. 
McKnight, President of the Gettysburg College, for his ser- 
vices as Chaplain at the Dedications. He had the honor to 
serve in the One-Hundred-and-Thirty-ninth Pennsylvania 
Volunteers — one of the old Sixth Corps regiments. 

The badges worn during the Reunion were neat and ap- 
propriate ; that of the survivors being red silken ribbon, with 
blue Greek cross, designating the old Third Division, which 
the Brigade served in, inscribed : " Survivors of the (each 
command having its own designation), Shaler's Brigade Re- 
union, Gettysburg, 1863-1888." The friends' were of white 
silken ribbon, with the same inscription, with the words 
" Friends," in place of " Survivors." 

Gettysburg Battlefield we found so well preserved as to 
scarcely need the services of a guide, the Battlefield Associa- 
tion having laid out roads along the entire lines, with sign- 
boards denoting the positions. Over two hundred monuments 
have been erected on positions occupied by troops in the 
action. All are original works of art ; many of unique and 
beautiful design. One would think, who has never visited the 
field, that with all these monuments it would have the sem- 
blance of a graveyard. Far from it, as it takes miles of driving 
to get around to view them. 

Whitey Williams, of the Twenty-third Pennsylvania 
" Commissary," found time with all his duties to act as the 
Good Samaritan in conveying Comrade Dougherty, who was 
injured on the train, to the hotel. By reason of the horses 
running away, he now wears a bran new pair of pants. 

Colonel John Oakey, of Brooklyn, and Colonel George 
W. Ford, of Connecticut, were the most venerable veterans on 
the trip, and seemed to enjoy the occasion quite as well as did 
the " youngsters." 

The Pennsylvania Railroad sent W. C Diefenderfer, Esq., 
their representative, with the special from Philadelphia, with 
orders to remain with the party until their return — something 
unusual. So comfort and convenience was assured. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



359 



Secretary ( ieorge Gilbert, of the One-Hundred and-Twen- 
ty-second, worked hard, looking after the comfort of the 
" Twosters," and was doubly repaid in the consolation that 
everybody was pleased. 

The Official Visitations to the Fields of the First, Second 
and Third Days was instruc- 
tive ; graphically described in 
story of the action as well as 
in the many hundreds of 
monuments, marking the 
positions occupied by the 
troops participating. The 
well-made roads, with the 
lines so distinctly marked, 
tells of the good work per- 
formed by the Battlefield As- 
sociation, in the preservation 
of the Mecca of the War. 

To all those on the trip 
we congratulate, as to their 
presence, dignity, sociability 
and good behavior, which 
made our first Reunion such a grand success and so happy 
an event. 

Captain O'Brien, of the Eighty-second Pennsylvania, with 
his two stalwart sons, said the occasion was the happiest day 
of his life. He don't seem to have lost any of the sunshine of 
life, " old as he is." 

Colonel William J. Wallace, of the Twenty-second, is the 
same old Bill Wallace, of army days. He and his good wife 
took in all the enjoyments of the trip. 

The Fayetteville Recorder, of New York, gave a very reada- 
ble detail of the Reunion, occupying several columns of their 
paper, during three weekly editions. Brevet-Major A. W. 
Wilkin, the editor, was on the trip, enjoying himself, as well 
as taking notes of all that was going on. 

Dr. Knapp, of the One-Hundred and-Twenty-second, after 
trying in vain to follow Captain Ostrander (who lost his leg in 




CI IAS. DONAHUE, 
Co. G. 



360 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 

the Wilderness,) over the field, dubbed him the " One legged 
antelope." 

The Birney Zouave Statue that surmounts the Twenty- 
third Pennsylvania Monument was designed by John Fergur- 
son, the proprietor of the Philadelphia Granite Works. It was 
modeled in clay by John Walz, Esq., of Philadelphia, a pupil 
of Prof. Wiley, late of the Academy of Fine Arts, of Philadel- 
phia, and of Professor Milley, of Paris. It represents a youthful 
soldier of nineteen years of age — the average age of the men 
of the regiment in 1863. The designer and modeler are to be 
congratulated upon the artistic and unique and appropriate 
position they have placed the figure. It is quite original ; 
showing the soldier grasping his piece from a trail arms — a 
reality — just as he appeared when he suddenly received the 
fire of the enemy- 
George Dougherty's body guard from Kensington were a 
jolly set and enjoyed the occasion very much. Our friend 
Sam Graves was of the party, and never tired trying to make 
everybody happy. 

Colonel Buehler, of Gettysburg, the Vice President of the 
Battle field Association, in very complimentary terms congratu- 
lated the Brigade visit as one of the most successful and 
pleasant that came to the old town. 

The boys of Corporal Skelly Post, Gettysburg, were 
around at all times, trying to make the visitors feel at home. 
The use of their comfortable Hall was tendered us should 
occasion require, for which we return thanks. 

Stout, robust, hale, hearty and rosy cheeks, Levi Albertson 
of the Twenty-third, worked and perspired in dealing around 
the ball-room the refreshments, and seemed to enjoy it ; im- 
bued with the sentiment of us all, always ready to assist in 
making everybody pleased. 

At the Dedication Grounds, nearly everybody cut a cane, 
or picked up some relic to take home to present to friends for 
their cabinets, as souvenirs of the spot where the Brigade was 
engaged. 

William Blanck, St., one of the oldest comrades of the 
Twenty-third, was on the trip with his aged wife. We found 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



361 



them with us in all the occasions of the celebration, notwith- 
standing the fatigue of the journey. 

The Eighty-second Pennsylvania Monument was the de- 
sign and workmanship of John Fergurson, of Philadelphia. 
The bronze coat-of-arms of the State of Pennsylvania, on the 
Twenty-third and Eighty-second monuments, was cast by 
Bureau Brothers, of Philadelphia. 

Colonel Wallace and Bill Baker took charge of the distri- 
bution of the programs of the Ball. They say the next time 
they take charge of such work it will be by orders and not as 



F 









- 1 \m^wm* 




THE WHIRLIGIG— REACHING EOR PRIZES. 
Twenty-third P. V. Camp, 1861. 

volunteers, as they lost nearly all their buttons in their desire 
to " just give me another one." 

We found both the Pennsylvania and New York Com- 
missioners in charge of the erection of monuments ; pains- 
taking, exacting and true to their trusts — for which we add 
our commendation and congratulations. We take great 
pleasure in publishing their names. 



::>_• HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 

PENNSYLVANIA COMMISSIONERS. 

General Jno. P. Taylor, General J. P. S. Gobin, Colonel 
lohn P. Nicholson, Colonel R. Bruce Ricketts, Major Samuel 
Harper. 

NEW YORK COMMISSIONERS. 
General Daniel E. Sickles, General Henry W. Slocum, 
General Joseph B. Carr, General Charles A. Richardson, Gen- 
eral Josiah Porter, General Charles K. Graham, Major George 
W. Coonev. 

Many of the comrades of the Twenty-third visited the 
spot bevond the Taneytown Road, in the rear of the left centre, 
where Lieutenant Joshua Garsed, one of their most efficient 
and brave officers, was killed during the action of July 3d. 
His brother, H. E. Garsed, Esq., of the Ninety-fifth Pennsyl- 
vania, one of Philadelphia's attorneys, and his nephew, we 
found among the visitors. 

The police of Gettysburg were well pleased with the 
visitation, as during the celebration they had no occasion to 
carry anvbody off to the guard-house. We thank them for 
the police regulations at the Camp-Fire and Ball. 

A contingent of the Chasseurs, Sixty-fifth New York, 
stopped at the Springs Hotel and enjoyed the medicinal waters 
of the celebrated Katasalyn Springs. We gave them a call 
on the visit to the first day's action, and were warmly wel- 
comed. 

THE SIXTH CORPS BADGE. 
The committee of arrangements for the Reunion at 
Gettysburg have prepared an elegant badge, to be worn by 
the survivors of the One Hundred and Twenty-second New 
York, and a separate badge for the friends who accompany 
them. The blue Greek cross which then designated the di- 
vision of the Sixth Corps to which the regiment was attached, 
forms a part of this badge. The frequent reorganizations 
made necessary by the heavy casualties of the campaigns 
under Grant, beginning in the Wilderness, while not separat- 
ing the regiments originally Shaler's Brigade, caused several 
changes in assignment to divisions; and the One Hundred 
and Twenty-second was at different limes attached to the First, 
Second and Third Divisions of the Sixth Corps, with corres- 



'ENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



363 




ponding changes in the color of the division cross. A 
"Twoster" can. therefore, sport a red, white or blue cross, as 
he pleases. His regiment never dishonored eitlierof the colors 
and carried itself with honor in all the prominent engagements 
in which the Army of the Poto- 
mac participated, from Antie- 
tam to Appomattox, and in ad- 
dition to these it bore a promi- 
nent part in the glories of the 
Valley Campaign under Sher- 
idan, in '64, winning laurels at 
" Fort Stevens," " Winches- 
ter," "Fisher's Hill" and 
" Cedar Creek." 

Tipton, the Gettysburg 
photographer, verv kindly 
furnished gratis the photos of 
the several cuts in this book 
appertaining to Gettysburg 
field. He says he couldn't 
think of making any charge for anything needed in the publi- 
cation. 

Nick Wilson, the Superintendent of the battlefield 
grounds, we found to be a genial gentleman, ready to accom- 
modate at all times. He wears the blue cross with pride, 
having served in the Third Division of the Sixth Corps. 

General Shaler brought with him, in honor of the Re- 
union, the old Brigade Headquarters flag. Comrade William 
McEntee, of the Sixty-fifth New York, took charge of it, earn- 
ing it on all occasions of the celebration. Mac felt highly 
honored in the selection, and well he might be, as the old 
standard led the Brigade in all its service. 

Sammy McPheeters, of the One Hundred and Twenty- 
second, on his way from Syracuse, found the night air so 
chilly, after getting into Pennsylvania, that he proposed to get 
out and make a fire of fence rails. Thanks to somebody, the 
stoves were found to be fully supplied with fuel, and soon the 
cars were made comfortable. So Sammv didn't go fence- 
railing. 



S I EPHEN PALMORE, 
1st Sergeant Co. 1 1. 



364 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



Captain R. H. Moses, of New York City, who has acted 
as the representative of the One Hundred and Twenty-second 
on the committee of arrangements for the Brigade Reunion, 
has devoted much time to the affair, and is to be congratulated 
by his comrades for the successful result. His interest in the 
old regiment, and all that concerns it, seems to increase with 
the advance of time. We are greatly indebted to him for in- 
formation furnished from time to time in the preparation 
of the Veterans' Column. 

The mothers, daughters and "other fellers' sisters" on the 
trip, added tone and dignity to the occasion ; so we couldn't 
help but be on our best behaviour. 

Colonel Glenn's party, consisting of his wife, two daugh- 
ters — Miss M. E. and Miss H. M. Glenn — Airs. Bovvers, Mrs. 
Swartz, John Fox and wife, John Woodhead and wife, George 
Boger and wife, Alex. Colville and wife, Lambert Cline and 
wife, Conrad Cline and wife, Samuel Collins and wife, John 
Callahan and wife, Jos. Jordan and wife, Harry Clayton and 
wife, Daniel Engleman and wife, James Weldon and wife, 
Samuel Cavin, Jos. Bartley, J. G Aitkin, O. G. Aitkin and 
Professor McMichael, were a most social crowd, adding much 
to the pleasure of the occasion. 

Little Johnnie Johnson's Brigade, from Philadelphia, was 
with us in forec, in light infantry order. The heavies were left 
back to guard the homestead. 

Captain Dick Lippincott marshalled the Rancocas con- 
tingent ol fourteen. They roomed together, a most social 
crowd. We found the squad wherever we went, enjoying the 
incision. Dick says he will have to kill some of them off, or 
they will soon outnumber the survivors. 

Joe White, of the Twenty-third, joined the column at 
( iettysburg, with his wife and daughter — Miss Laura, R. Frank 
Walker, wife and son, ("has. \Y. Gibson, wile and daughter — 
Miss Pauline, James (',. Milliken, wile and son — Clayton, all of 
Eastern Maryland; so Maryland. " My Maryland" was repre- 
sented with a very pleasant party of our friends. They 
stopped over to erect the Maryland veterans who wen- to 

dedicate tablets. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOL! NTEER INFANTRY. 



365 



Comrade Redheffer, of the Eighty second, had been pre- 
vailed upon, by one of the young lady attaches of the City 
Hotel, to act as her escort to the Ball. While he was tem- 
porarily absent, arranging his curly locks and making his 
toilet, Captain Williams (82d), having previously learned of 
these intentions, ingratiated 
himself into the good graces .--'.■ 

of the aforesaid young lady, \ 

and easily persuaded her to 
cut the "Corporal" and ac- 
cept the "Captain" as her es- 
cort. When Redheffer, in lull 
leather, returned, and learned 
what had been done in his ab- 
sence, he was a little put out 
at the disappointment, but 
solaced himself with the old 
adage of there being "as good 
hsh in the sea as ever were 
caught." Being apprised that 
" Grand Pop " Cochrane had 
promised to do the agreeable 
for two other of the young 
ladies of the hotel, Bill not wanting to be left out in the cold en- 
tirely, called upon the young ladies in question and informed 
them that Dick would not be able to chaperon them, and, in 
his usual suave and persuasive manner, induced them to permit 
him to do the honors ; to which the ladies gladly and willingly 
assented, and the "Corporal" astonished the boys of the Eighty- 
second by marching into the ball-room, escorting the two 
young ladies. Poor Dick, when he learned of the trick that 
had been so successfully played on him, vowed vengeance on 
the destroyer of his happiness. He rushed to the Rink, 
resolved to spill the Corporal's gore. He entered the ball- 
room, with blood in his eyes ; but, at the sight of so much 
beauty, he became completely dazzled, and in a few moments 
he was waltzing around the room with one of the City belles, 
entirely oblivious to all, and seemingly very happy with him- 
self. But Dick declared that the next time he makes an 
engagement to act as escort to a young lady, he will have the 
Corporal muzzled. 




JOHN HENDERSON. 
Co. E. 



366 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 

The popular Adjutant of the Twenty-third, Thomas K. 
Boggs, by reason of a severe wound received in action, is 
now an invalid. His physician would not permit him to 
attend the Reunion, but he was with us in contribution and 
spirit. Many inquiries were made for him by the boys. 

To all the survivors of the Brigade who were unable to 
be with us on the trip, we send hearty greetings, and hope 
they will answer roll-call at the next Reunion. 

The Brigade Committee issued a card program, to con- 
veniently carry in the vest pocket, containing the hour of each 
of the many ceremonies of the Reunion. We found it 
quite hand}' ; saving the annoyance of hunting up the Com- 
mittee, to learn " what next?" 

Secretary Krauth, of the Battlefield Association, very 
kindly secured from the town authorities the use of the Court 
House, for the Camp-Fire. This gentleman we found ready 
and willing at all times to assist, and we thank him for his 
many attentions. 

The newspapers gave very extended notices of our 
Brigade celebration, for which we cordially thank them. 

Dr. Roller, of Hollidaysburg, don't seem to age fast. From 
Surgeon of the Twenty-third he became one of the distin- 
guished of his profession in the Army of the Potomac. He 
met many on the trip whom he attended their wounds on the 
field. The boys were glad to greet him. 

Colonel Sam Truesdell, Secretary of the Sixty-fifth, with 
his artificial leg, managed to get around to participate in all 
the events of the occasion, although he had to talk in 
whispers — the result of a severe cold contracted on the trip. 

The old Colonel of the One-hundred-and-twenty-second, 
Colonel Silas Titus, we found with his old command, looking 
hale and hearty for one so aged. May he live for many, 
many more years and enjoy the pleasures of life. 

The Complimentary Ball of the Twenty-third was a 
pleasing ending of the festivities of the Reunion ; giving the 
opportunity of all mingling in the pleasures of youthful time, 
which was indeed very much enjoyed by the Brigade people, 
as well as those of Gettysburg's invited. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



367 



The hospitality extended by all the commands made 
everybody feel at home, and it was the expression from all 
that in the near future the 
Reunion. 



Brigade should hold another 



Groups of the survivors around the monuments and 
other points on the field were taken by the photographers, 
Tipton and Mumford, of Gettysburg, Rile et Co., of Phila- 
delphia. 

Shaler's Brigade monuments are on the top of a slope at 
Gulp's Hill, in rear of the line of works they occupied during 
the action of the morning of the third day. The Battlefield 
Association, in arranging the positions, laid out brigade lines. 
Green's Brigade, Twelfth Corps, who built and originally 
occupied the works, are placed immediatelv in rear of the 
front line. Twenty feet back is Candy's Brigade line, who 
relieved them, and twenty feet further back is Shaler's, with 
the exception of the One-hundred-and-twenty-second New- 
York, who occupy a large boulder in the works — thev having 
secured a deed for the position 
before that portion of the line 
was purchased by the Asso- 
ciation. 

Of the forty survivors of 
the One-hundred-and-twentv- 
second New York Volunteers 
present, three had each lost a 
leg, three each an arm, and 
a number of the others bore 
honorable scars. 

The audience at the 
Camp-Fire were very enthus- 
iastic, catching on quickly to 
all that was good. It was, 
indeed, quite an honor to pre- 
side over such an assembly, so full of distinction, intelligence 
and appreciation. 

What stalwart fellows were the One-hundred-and-twentv- 
second New York. It must be a fine growing country up in 
Onondaga County ; we shook hands with several of the bovs 




THOS. H. MICHALS, 
Sergeant Co. H. 



368 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



over six feet. Poole, Gilbert and Hubbs, as a combine, would 
weigh as much as the gallant chargers at Balakava numbered. 

Syracuse was well represented in all that assisted in mak- 
ing the Reunion a success. Strong in numbers, sociability, 
eloquence and deportment. 

For the compilation of this book and the other honors 
bestowed upon the Secretary, he gratefully returns his thanks 
to the Brigade Association. 

Mr. W. C. Diefenderfer, of Philadelphia, who was detailed 
as the representative of the Pennsylvania Railroad Passenger 
Department for the round trip, was indefatigable in making 
all the railway arrangements as comfortable as possible. Y\V 
found him quite a pleasant gentleman, who seemed to enjoy 
the trip. 

Captain Thomas McKean, of the Eighty-second, came on 
from Brooklyn, and was warmly welcomed bv his old com- 
rades, whom he had not met since the muster-out. Although 
nearly half a centennial since he was born, he don't seem to 
have passed the thirties. 

The following are the crews that safely carried our Special 
from Philadelphia to Gettysburg and return, and we shake 
them warmlv by the hand. 

Pennsylvania Railroad — To Harrisburg. 

Conductor — Jas. Sterling. Baggage -Master — Jno. M. Mur- 
phy. Brakemen — Frank Frenip, Hayes Speakman. Engineer — 

B. F. Kennedy. Fireman — Jno. Cline. 

Cumberland Valley — Harrisburg To Gettysburg. 

Conductor — E. N. Linthurst. Brakeman — Lindsay Reed. 
Baggage-Master — Jos. Poulton. Engineer—']. L. Talhelm. Fire- 
man — A. Talhelm. 

On the home trip we came through from Harrisburg to 

Philadelphia, without a stop, forty-five minutes ahead of time, 
in charge i >i 

Engineer — Samuel Lilly — Fireman — M. Kirk. Conductor — 

C. W. Rowan. Brakeman — Jas. Thatcher and Ceo. Peterson, 

Colonel Glenn, of the Twenty-third, said he intended the 
trip should be the best one of his life. Now he's happy, as he 



PENNSYLVANIA V< >LUNTEER INFANTRY. 



369 



not only got his wish, but succeeded in making everybody 
have a share in just such a claim. 

Twenty-Third Pennsylvania Volunteers. 
The Survivors' Association, on Tuesday evening last, 
were presented with marks of appreciation of their hospitality 
during their Brigade Gettysburg Reunion, from the Brigade 
Committee, the Eighty-second Pennsylvania, Sixty-fifth New 
York and One-hundred-and-twenty-second New York. As 
hosts of the occasion, they were glad to know how well every- 
body was pleased. 

General Alexander Shaler, Chairman of the Brigade Com- 
mittee, wrote a very complimentary letter of thanks in behalf 
of the Committee of Arrange- 
ments. The next in order was 
the reading of a resolution of 
thanks from the Eighty-sec- 
ond Pennsylvania Volunteers' 
Association. A letter from the 
Sixty-fifth New York was very 
expressive of thanks, ending 
with " God bless the old 
Twenty-third." The next in or- 
der was a handsomely framed 
group of the One-hundred- 
and-twenty-second New York 
survivors, who were present at 
Gettysburg, accompanied with 
an elaborate engrossed framed 
lettter of resolutions. 

Then followed the presentation of testimonials to Com- 
rades Wm. H. Bantom, Gott. Staiger, Cranmer Williams, Geo. 
Dougherty of the " Commissary Department," and Captain 
Jas. M. Craig, of Allegheny City, who worked hard to make 
the Reunion a success. The gifts were gold badges, in cir- 
cular form, embracing the Sixth Corps mark, red enamel in 
centre, with the words "23d P. V." on the top scroll and " '63 — 
Gettysburg- — '88" on the lower, with their names on the re- 
verse side. Colonel John F. Glenn, the President of their As- 
sociation, was then presented with a gold Sixth Corps badge, 
in two colors, red and blue, representing the two divisions 




ADEN E. MICKLE, 
Co. H. 



370 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 

which the regiment had served in, and having in the centre a 
diamond of the first water, flanked with the words "23d P. 
V.;" on the reverse side was inscribed: " From the boys of the 
23d P. V., to Col. Jno. F. Glenn." The presentation speeches 
were made by Secretary Wray and were feelingly responded 
to by the recipients. At the close of the meeting all hands, 
upon the invitation of Comrade Bantom, adjourned to his 
home and were handsomely entertained. 

While the Sixth Corps at Gettysburg were on the reserve, 
they were close up to the front line in support. We found the 
Greek cross scattered pretty well around the line ; out at the 
extreme right and left, the left centre, to right of Little Round 
Top, Culp's Hill and Cemetery Hill ; all under fire, ready to 
go in as opportunity offered. 

Meade's headquarters we found to have been changed in 
appearance, but learned the Battlefield Association had pur- 
chased the old house and would restore it to its original looks. 
Thanks for their consideration. 

Johnny Doyle, with his squad of Pittsburg friends, stopped 
at the McClellan House, remaining over to take in the dedica- 
tions, and then took a flyer to New York, on matters con- 
nected with the next Presidency of the Nation. 

The Eighty-second brought with them one of their old 
drummer boys, R. T. Blaikie, Point of Rocks, Pa., who gave 
us all the Army calls en route on the train. When George 
Blanck, of the Twenty-third, heard the sheepskin sounding, he 
couldn't resist from being the boy again, and joined the corps 
at once, full of his mischievous pranks. 

The Grand March, " Guard the Flag," played at the 
Twenty-third Ball and Reception, was presented by the com- 
poser, George Vickers, Esq., of Philadelphia, with his compli- 
ments. 

Comrade McAlpin, of the Sixty-fifth New York, came all 
the way from Providence, Rhode Island, to have a shake hands 
with the " Chasseurs." 

Matt Spence, of the Twenty-third, from Brooklyn, with his 
son, from New York Citv, joined the Pilgrims on the morning 
of departure, at Philadelphia. He was heartily greeted by the 
boys of C Company, whom he had not met since muster-out. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



371 



Frank, of the Twenty third Commissary Department, in 
his stump speech at the Rink Building, after speaking of the 
heavy mortars of Betz'sbest, Gibson's light batteries and grape 
and cannister of Duffy's Pure Malt, exclaimed : " Talk about 
your engagements at de first 
Gettysburg. Why, it was 
nothing to compare when de 
batteries were opened at de 
Ball ; for after de fight were 
over dare programs were full 
of engagements. Many, many 
fell. The fire was so hot that 
the best of dem had to take 
water. 

Matthews, of the Eighty- 
second, is now one of the Yan- 
kees, residing at New Haven, 
Connecticut. He was accom- 
panied by his son, and was 
warmly greeted by his old 
comrades. 

James Tate, the celebrated detective of Philadelphia, 
served with honor in the Twenty-third Pennsylvania Volun- 
teers. He was on the trip, and took good care that none of the 
crooked people were on the train to work the pilgrims. 

John Henderson, Geo. Boyer and William Bartley, with 
the stalwart policeman of the town, were a good team in charge 
of the door at the Ball. 

While the hotels, with the numerous boarding-houses at 
Gettysburg, manage to provide quarters for all who visit the 
battlefield, would it not pay for the Pennsylvania Railroad or 
some other enterprising company to erect a first-class hotel, 
for the accommodation of four or five hundred guests. Why 
not the citizens of the old town size up to the occasion. The 
report shows the visitations are larger each year. 




JAS. FULI.ERTON, 
Corporal Co. H. 



372 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 

REVIEW OF THE REUNION. 

BY GENERAL ALEX. SHALER. 

It is difficult to convey to the mind of an absent comrade the 
degree of enjoyment experienced by those who attended this memor- 
able meeting ; much more difficult is it to describe the scenes in such 
terms as will enable one who has not had campaign and battlefield 
experience to appreciate the cordiality with which old soldiers greet 
each other after years of separation. Army life, in war times, is one 
of almost constant privations, and of frequent sufferings. The great 
mass of the men composing an army are on an equality. Their com- 
forts and discomforts are the same. Their pleasures and their pains 
are the same, and the longer they serve together, the more they 
become like brothers to each other. When the war is over, and the 
organization is disbanded, the men return to their respective homes 
and resume their former vocations and walks of life. Engrossed with 
these, they have but little time and less opportunity to maintain the 
comradeship of the war, but their attachments are never forgotten. 
Years may roll by, and long distances may separate them, but the 
men who stood shoulder to shoulder in defence of the old flag ; who 
slept and ate together ; who toiled and rested together ; who shared 
their rations with each other, can never forget their brothers in arms. 
So it is, that when they meet, recollections of the past are revived, 
scenes of pleasure and of suffering are recalled, memories of good 
deeds and kind words are brought to mind, and they greet each other 
with a hearty cordiality, almost unknown to others. It was con- 
spicuously so at this reunion. Officers and men of one regiment 
greeted those of another regiment like long lost brothers, and all vied 
with each other in doing honor to their General and his Staff, and in 
expressing their cordial attachments. 

The time selected for the reunion, in advance of the "Army 
Reunion," was fortunate in that it secured to us all the facilities for 
sight-seeing, and all the benefits of the preparations made by the good 
p<-op]< "i i. .ii\ b\ii-o -for the larger gathering to follow. Thi weathei 
was all that could be desired. The programme was excellent and 
faithfully observed. It would have been impossible to plan a better 

one, irr) it out more successfully. From first to last everything 

ran smoothly. Not a hitch occurred, nor anything to mar the pleas- 
ures of the trip, save the slight accident to a member of the Twenty- 
third Regiment, on the cars. Our enjoyment was greatly enhanced 
in observing the interesl taken by our relatives and friends in every- 
thing to be seen on the battlefield, the curiosity the) displayed in the 
pin i obtained, and in the desire they manifested to learn all about 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 373 



the great battle. It was a source of unlimited pleasure to us to be 
able tu contribute so much to the pleasure of our dearest friends. 

Gettysburg is a memorable held, and long after the last reunion 
of participants in the battle shall have been held, will be visited by 
people from the world over, very much as Waterloo now is, but with 
much greater interest. Visitors of the present day, but not those of 
the future, may learn from survivors the unwritten history of the 
battle ; and we owe it to our descendants that every opportunity be 
taken to impart to them the knowledge we possess regarding its 
details. And the same should be done in reference to every other 
important battlefield of the war. 

Our brigade was popular and well known in the army. It enjoyed 
the confidence of its commanding officers, and rendered conspicuous 
and oftentimes delicate services. Among its survivors are those who 
have taken part in every battle of the Army of the Potomac. What 
a history they could write ! And how much could be learned from 
their recitals ! It is safe to say that there is not a member of the old 
brigade, not a relative or friend, who attended this reunion, that does 
not feel a thousand times rewarded for the time and money spent in 
doing so. On all sides, in returning home, we heard the most earnest 
expressions of gratification and pleasure, coupled with the hope that 
our brigade reunions will hereafter be held periodically. Such gather- 
ings give an opportunity for the revival of army reminiscences and 
tend to keep alive the spirit of loyalty and fraternity, so prominent in 
the breast of all true soldiers. Why, then, should we not encourage 
them ? Let us devote just a little of the short time remaining to us in 
this agreeable and patriotic way. It will do us good. 

In contemplating the pleasures of this joyful reunion, the Brigade 
Committee are reminded of the great obligation we all are under to our 
gallant comrades of the Twenty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, for 
their never-ending hospitality. The record shows how, from the start 
at Philadelphia, they commenced the dispensation of good things, and 
never ceased the flow until they returned home ; but less than justice 
would be done Colonel Glenn and his brave veterans if we neglected 
this opportunity to place on record a special acknowledgment for the 
hearty and constant attention shown by the survivors of the Twenty- 
third to the comfort and pleasure of their brothers in arms and their 
friends. 

The whole brigade were made the guests of the Twenty-third, and 
recollections of their lavish hospitality will always be remembered as an 
unliquidated indebtedness on the part of the recipients. 

With equal pleasure the Committee acknowledge the zeal and en- 
ergy displayed by its Secretary, Comrade William J. Wray, of the 
Twenty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, in the work indispensable on 



374 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



such occasions. To him the Brigade are indebted for the inception, 
the development and the execution of the work of the programme, from 
which we derived so much pleasure. In arranging details nothing es- 
caped him. In the execution of them, his business-like and systematic 
methods, and his untiring energy insured success. By his voluntary 
labors the Committee were relieved from much necessary work ; and it 
gives them no little satisfaction to express to him, through this medium, 
their individual heartfelt thanks for the services which contributed so 
much to the comfort and pleasure of the attendants at our first re- 
union. 




BOUNTY' 
$500. 

RECEUIIS 



FAMILIAR SCENE IN ALL PARTS OF THE 
I "l NTRV IN 1S63-64-65. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 375 



Names and Addresses of those on the Trip. 



Note. — Those marked with 

Figure i indicate Friends of Headquarters. 

2 " " " 23d Pa. Vols. 

3 " " " 82d Pa. Vols. 

4 " " " 65th N. V. Vols. 

5 " " " i22d N. Y. Vols. 



A. 

Amidon, Geo., i22d N.Y. , Onondaga, N. Y. 

Albertson, Levi B., 23d P. V., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Arment, Wm. H., S2d P. V. , Philadelphia, Pa. 
-Aitken, J. C, Philadelphia, Pa. 
J Aitken, 0. C, Philadelphia, Pa. 
"Atwood, \V. , Philadelphia, Pa. 

B. 

'Boughton, Wm. DeL. , Colonel Brigade Staff, New York City. 
'Boughton, Mrs. Colonel, New York City. 
-Brooks, Wm. , Philadelphia, Pa. 
'Blackburn, Peter, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Bantom, Wm. H., 23d P. V., Philadelphia, Pa. 
-Boger, Geo., 8Sth P. V., Philadelphia, Pa. 
J Bartley, Jos., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Bartley, Wm., 23d P. V., Philadelphia, Pa. 
'Bean, Lewis, Manayunk, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Boreland, J. W., 23d P. V., East Brady, Pa. 

Blair, Frank P., 61st P. V., Pittsburg, Pa. 
-Blair, Mrs. Frank P., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Bieger, Philip, 23d P. V., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Brower, P. H., 65th N. Y. , New York City. 

Blanck, Sr. , Wm. , 23d P. V. , Philadelphia, Pa. 
-Blanck, Sr. , Mrs Wm., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Blanck, Geo., 23d P. V. , Camden, N. J. 
- Blanck, Edward, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Bingham, B. F. , i22dN. Y., Washington, D. C. 

Beach, And. W. , i22dN. Y. , Marcellus, N. Y. 

Butler, James, i22d N. Y. , Syracuse, N. Y. 

Brand, H. C, i22d N. Y. , Stiles' Station, N. Y. 

'Bodder, Mrs. Martha J., Philadelphia, Pa. 



376 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 

Bean, Lewis, Manayunk, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Bland, Lieutenant H. Willis. 82d P. Y. . Reading, Pa. 

Bird, W'm., 82d P. V., Hampton, \'a. 

Boswell, Chas. A., Color Sergeant 82d P. V., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Blaikie, R. T., 82d P. V., Picture Rocks, Pa. 
-Buckley, Mr., 69th P. V., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Burger, Abraham M., 23d P. V., York, Pa. 

Baker, Wm. J., 23d P. Y., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Barker, James, Philadelphia, Pa. 
-Bennett, Geo., Philadelphia, Pa. 

C. 

Craig, Captain Jas. M. , 23d P. V. , Allegheny City, Pa. 
"Craig, Mrs. Captain, Allegheny City, Pa. 
-Craig, Miss Annie B., Allegheny Citv, Pa. 

Craig, Master Edward A., Allegheny City, Pa 

Carpenter, Miss, New York City. 
"'Cooper, H. R.. Syracuse, N. Y. 

Cossitt, Major Davis, I22d N. Y., Onondaga, N. Y. 
'Cossitt, Mrs. Major, Onondaga, N. Y. 

Chase, Amasa, Color Sergeant, 122c! N. Y., Fayetteville, N. Y. 

Crampton, Jas., i22d N. Y., Cicero, N. Y. 

Cochran, Richard, 82d P. V., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Colville. David, 23d P. V., Philadelphia, Pa. 
J Colville, Alexander, Philadelphia, Pa. 
2 Colville, Mrs. Alexander, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Cline, Lambert, Philadelphia, Pa. 
"Cline, Mrs. Lambert, Philadelphia, Pa. 
"Cline, Conrad, Philadelphia, Pa. 

("line, Mrs. Conrad, Philadelphia, Pa. 

< lollins, Samuel, Philadelphia, Pa. 
-Collins, Mrs. Samuel, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Callahan, John, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Callahan, Mrs. John, Philadelphia, Pa. 

1 !layton, I [arry, Philadelphia. Pa. 
Clayton, Mrs. Hairy, Philadelphia, Pa. 

I .1; in, Samuel, Philadelphia, Pa. 

I hadwii k, Thos. I., ^.\<\ P. V., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Chadwick, Mrs. Thos. I., Philadelphia. Pa. 

Culbertson, E. A., 23d P. V., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Corn. Lawrence, ^.vl P. V., Philadelphia, Pa. 

n. 

Dilks, Lieutenant W'm. II., 82d P. V., Philadelphia, |\,. 
Dougherty, Geo. , 23d P. V., Philadelphia, Pa. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. :!77 

Doyle, John, 23d P. V., Pittsburg, Pa. 
z Denny, Patrick, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Dunn. Chris. C, 82d P. V., Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, Pa. 
'Dunn, Master James, Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Davis, Lewis. 82d I'. V., Philadelphia, Pa. 

E. 
Eldridge, Charles, i22d N. Y., New York City. 
! Engle, Ezra, Masonville, X. J. 

'Engleman, Daniel, Philadelphia, Pa. 
2 Engleman, Mrs. Daniel, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Elliott, Robert, 23d P. V., Philadelphia, Pa. 

'Eiseman, M., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Engel, Lewis, S2d P. Y. , Philadelphia, Pa. 

F. 

4 Ford, Col. Geo. W., Brigade Quartermaster, Kensington, Conn. 
'Fitzgerald, John, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Fox, John. Philadelphia, Pa. 
■Fox, Mrs. John, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Finley. William, 23d P. V., Philadelphia, Pa. 
-'Friant. M. B. . Rancocas, X. J. 
J Funk, Charles, Rancocas, N. J. 

Fite. John F. , 82d P. V., Philadelphia, Pa. 
'Feger, Jos. M., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Freeman, H. C. , 65th X. Y. , New York. 

G. 

Glenn, Colonel John F. , 23d P. Y. , Philadelphia, Pa. 
"Glenn, Mrs. Colonel, Philadelphia, Pa. 
J Glenn, Miss M. E. , Philadelphia, Pa. 
J Glenn, Miss H. M., Philadelphia, Pa. 
J Garsed, H. E. , 95th P. Y., 1 brother of Lieutenant Garsed, 23d P. 

V. .. Philadelphia, Pa. 
"Gillespie, Win. , Philadelphia, Pa. 
"Grieves, F. Samuel, Philadelphia, Pa. 
•Gillingham, B. H., Morristown, X. ]. 

Green, William. 23d P. Y., Philadelphia, Pa. 
J Green, Joseph, Philadelphia, Pa. 

'Grow, Mrs. Fred. C. , (niece of General Shaler), New York City. 
-Grier, Samuel C. , Pittsburg, Pa. 

Gibson, John. 23d P. V., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Gardiner, John, 23d P. Y., Frankford, Philadelphia, Pa. 
-'Gibson, Chas. W. , Easton, Md. 
-'Gibsiin. Mrs. Chas. W.. Easton, Md. 



378 HISTORY ()F THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 

■Gibson, Miss Pauline, Easton, Md. 
5 Gaylord, Miss, Washington, D. C. 

Gere, Colonel Jas. M., i22d N. Y. , Syracuse, N. Y. 

Goodfellow, Stephen, i22dN. V., Belle Isle, N. V. 

Gilbert, Captain George H., i22d N. Y. , Syracuse, N. Y. 
5 Gilbert, Mrs. Geo. H., Syracuse, N. Y. 

Girton, Wm. A., 82d P. Y. , Bristol, Pa. 
3 Girton, Mrs. Wm. A., Bristol, Pa. 
"Gripp, John, Pittsburg, Pa. 

H. 

Hubbs, Alex. H., I22d N. Y., Syracuse, N. Y. 

Hilsee, Robert, 23d P. Y., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Hasson, John, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Henderson, John, 23d P. Y., Philadelphia, Pa. 
2 Hansell, Wilmot, Philadelphia, Pa. 
"Hansell, George, 7 2<1 P. V., Philadelphia, Pa. 
"Hansell, Edwin, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Hazlett, John, 23d P. Y., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Huber, Chas. F.,.23d P. Y. , Philadelphia, Pa. 
"Hughes, Thos. J., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Hawkins, Lieutenant Jno. T., 82d P. Y. , Philadelphia, Pa. 
"Hawkins, Mrs. Lieutenant, Philadelphia, Pa. 

'Hungerford, Mrs., Syracuse, N. Y. 

Heintz, E. A., Philadelphia, Pa. 
s Heintz, Mrs. E. A., Philadelphia, Pa. 

1. 
Ivers, Captain Albert, 82d P. V., Philadelphia, Pa. 
'Ivers, Mrs. Captain, Philadelphia, Pa. 
3 Ivers, Master Lewis, Philadelphia, Pa. 
'Ivers, Little Miss Violet May, Philadelphia, Pa. 

J- 
Johnson, Jno. R., Captain and Aid-de-Camp to General Shaler, 23d 

P. V., Cleveland, 0. 
'Johnson, Mrs. Captain, Cleveland, O. 
'Jussen, Mrs. Colonel Carl, (daughter of General Shaler), New York 

City. 
Johnston, John G. , 23d P. \\. Philadelphia, Pa. 
[ohnston, Mrs. John (',., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Johnston, Master Walter, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Johnston, Master Nathan, Philadelphia, Pa. 
'Johnston, Master Harry, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Johnston, Little Miss Rebecca, Philadelphia, Pa. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 379 



Jordan. Joseph. Philadelphia, Pa. 
Jordan, Mrs. Joseph, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Johns, William, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Jaw Frank, Philadelphia, Pa. 

■Jannev, Master Richard, (nephew of Lieutenant Garsed, 23d P. V. I, 
Roxborough, Philadelphia, Pa. 

K. 
Knapp, Dr. E. A., Surgeon i22d N. Y., Syracuse, N. V. 
Knapp, Mrs. Charles, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Kelly, John. 23d P. V., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Kennen, Chas. , 82d P. Y. , Philadelphia, Pa. 
'Kennen, Mrs. Chas., Philadelphia, Pa. 

L. 

Lippincott, Richard R., 23d and 61st P. V., Rancocas, N. J. 

Landenberger, Drum Major, 23d P. Y., Perkasie, Pa. 
-Lundy, Jos., Rancocas, N. J. 
-Lippincott. Wm. P., Hartford, N. J. 

Lapp, John, 23d P. Y., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Linton, John H., 23d P. Y. , Philadelphia, Pa. 
2 Linton, Mrs. Jno. PL, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lawrence, Jno. G. , 82d P. Y. , Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lathrop, Chas. G. , i22d N. Y. , Onondaga, N. Y. 

Lamphier, Chas. R., 122c! N. Y., Elbridge, N. Y. 

Lockwood, Calvin, i22d N. Y. . Stiles Station, N. Y. 

'Loomis, N. E. , Syracuse, N. Y. 

Loomis, J. L. , Philadelphia, Pa. 

'Loomis. Mrs. J. L. , Philadelphia, Pa. 

M. 
Moses, Captain Rob't H. , i22d X. Y., New York City. 
"Moses, B., Washington, D. C. 
Moses, Mrs. Guy. Washington, D. C. 
Moses, Captain Lucius, i22d N. Y. , Marcellus, N. Y. 
Munro, Jr., Captain D. A., i22d N. Y., Camillus, N. Y. 
Munro, Mrs. D. A., Camillus, N. Y. 
Morris, W. H., i22dN. Y., New York. 
3 Mathews, C. H., New Haven, Ct. 
Mathews, J. L. , S2d P. V., New Haven, Ct. 
Meeker, Mrs. Stephen B., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Morris, (no. G , 82d P. Y., Manayunk, Philadelphia, Pa. 
'Morris, Mrs. Jno. G , Manayunk, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Morris, Wm. H., i22d N. Y. , Pompey, N. Y. 
'Malcolm, Wm. , Philadelphia, Pa. 



380 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 

Miller. Wm. H.. 23d P. Y. , Henry Clay, Del. 
-'Murphv, Michael, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Martin, Emlin, Rancocas, N. J. 

Moffitt, John, 23d P. Y., Pittsburg, Pa. 
-'.Moffiitt, Mrs. John, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Murphy, P. J., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Maxwell. Captain John, 2;-,<A P. Y., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Miller, Wm., (grandson of Colonel Wallace), Philadelphia, Pa. 
s Maguire, Chas. , Philadelphia, Pa. 

Miliord, Wm. W., 23d P. V., Frankford, Philadelphia, Pa. 
-Milford. Miss Hattie, Frankford, Philadelphia, Pa. 
z Milford, Archy, Frankford. Philadelphia, Pa. 
-'Mayberry, Wm. W. , 90th P. V., Philadelphia, Pa. 
-Millikin, Jas. C. , Easton, Md. 

Millikin. Mrs. J. C, Easton. Md. 

Millikin, Clayland, Easton, Md. 

Murphy. John J.,82d P. Y. , Hampton, Va. 

Me. 

McMichael, Prof. Lemuel, Philadelphia, Pa. 

McKean, Captain Thos. C. , 82(1 P. V., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
-McLaughlin, Frank, Philadelphia, Pa. 

McCoy, Harry, 23d P. V., Philadelphia, Pa. 
! McGrath, Edward, Philadelphia, Pa. 

McKenna, James, 23d P. Y. , Pittsburg, Pa. 

MeClearv, Wm., Pittsburg, Pa. 

McKinney, Joseph, 23d P. Y., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Mi Kinnev, Mrs. Jos., Philadelphia, I'a. 

McEntee, Sergeant, 65th N. Y. , New York. 

McAlpin, Sergeant I., 65 N. Y., Pawtucket, R. 1. 

Mi < rinnis, Jas., 23d P. V., Philadelphia, Pa. 

McClelland, Richard, 23d P. Y., Wilmington, Del. 

McClelland, Mrs. Richard, Wilmington, Del. 
McMillan, Robert, Philadelphia, I'a. 

McPheeters, Sam'l, I22d N. Y., Minneapolis, Minn. 

M> Arthur. George, [22dN. Y.. Syracuse, X. Y 

N. 
Nicholson, William. Philadelphia, I'a. 

O. 
< lolonel John. Brooklyn, V Y. 
< I'Brien, Captain fohn T., 82d I'. V., Philadelphia, Pa. 
O'Brien, Jr., J. T., Philadelphia, I'a. 
O'B Ed. J., Philadelphia, Pa, 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 383 



Ostrander, Captain Chas. W., t22d X. Y.. Syracuse, N. Y. 
'Ostrander, Mrs. Capt., Syracuse, X. Y. 

1'. 

Patrick. Captain Rob't \Y., S2 P. V., Philadelphia, Pa. 

I'aynter, Thos. A., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Peile, Frank C, 23d P. V., Philadelphia. Pa. 

Purnell, John H.. 23d P. V., Allegheny City. 
-Purnell. A. V., Allegheny City. Pa. 

Park. Win., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Paddock, James. Camillas, X. Y. 
'Pomerov, Byron E., 193d N. V., Otisco. X. Y. 

Poole, Major Theo. L., 122c! X. Y. 

R. 

Roller. Dr. Win. C. , Surgeon 23d P. Y.. Hollidaysburg, Pa. 
'Roller, Master A. K., Hollidaysburg, Pa. 

Ryan, Captain Martin, 1220! N. Y. , Syracuse. X. Y. 

Rich. C. L., 1221I X. Y.. Marcellus, X. Y. 

Richards. Isaac, 1221I X. Y.. Marcellus, N. Y. 

Rich, E. D., Syracuse. X. Y. 
"Reeves, Walter, Moorestown, X. J. 

Robinson. James, 23d P. Y.. Philadelphia, Pa. 
'Rile. J. L., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Rudolph, Captain J. S., S2d P. \'.. Philadelphia. Pa. 
'Rinear, Master Wm., Paulsboro, X. J. 

Redheffer. Wm. H., 82(1 P. V., Philadelphia, Pa. 
"Redheffer. Master Wm. H., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Rodeback, Solomon, 82d 1*. V. . Philadelphia, Pa. 

S. 
Shaler, Alex. , General Commanding Brigade, New York City. 
'Shaler, Mrs. General, Xew York City. 
'Shaler, Ira A., (son of the General 1. Xew York City. 
'Shaler, Miss Mattie W., (daughter of the General), Xew York City. 
'Stevens, Mrs.. Philadelphia, Pa. 
Slaysman, Geo. L., 23d P. Y.. Pittsburg. Pa. 
-'Stevens, Vincent, Pittsburg, Pa. 
Smallwood, Chas. E. , 23d P. Y., Philadelphia. Pa. 
Stokly, Joseph, 23d P. Y.. Eddystone, Pa. 
'Stokly, Miss Elizabeth, Eddystone, Pa. 
Staiger, Gottleib. 23d P. Y.. Philadelphia. Pa. 
Spence, James, 23d P. Y., Philadelphia, Pa. 
'Sailor, Wm.. Philadelphia, Pa. 
[Spence, Matthew, 23d P. Y.. Brooklyn. X. Y. 



382 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



= Spence, Lewis J., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Sensenderfer, Jas. A., <S2cl P. V., Philadelphia, Pa. 
2 Stafford, William, Manayunk, Philadelphia, Pa. 
"Stafford, Mrs. Wm., Manayunk, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Slauson, A. M., New York City. 
'Slauson, Mrs. A. M., New York City. 

Slauson, Miss, New York City. 

Slauson, Miss Nellie, New York City. 
'Smith, Silas R., Homer, N. Y. 

Smith, Albert R., 12 2d N. Y., Homer, N. Y. 

Smith, Merrick, i22d N. Y., Tiffin, O. 

Stewart, Charles, i22d N. Y., Syracuse, N. Y. 

Sharp, Benj. W. , i22d N. Y., Ithaca, N. Y. 

Sherick, Jno., 23d P. V. , Washington Borough, Pa. 
-Swartz, Mrs., Philadelphia, Pa. 

T. 

Titus, Silas, Col., i22d N. Y., Syracuse, N. Y. 
Tracy, O. V., Bvt. Lieut-Col., i22dN. Y., Syracuse, N. Y. 
'Tracy, Mrs. Col, Syracuse, N. Y. 
'Tracy, Charles Sedgwick, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Thompson, Wm., I22d N. Y., Homer, N. Y. 
Tate, James, 23d P. V., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Tustin, Isaac, 23d P. V. , Philadelphia, Pa. 
Tucker, Cummings, H., New York City. 
'Tucker, Mrs., New York City. 
Taylor, Harry B., 72c! P. V., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Thorn, H. St. Clair, Philadelphia, Pa. 
-Thorn, Mrs. H. St. Clair, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Tate, Hugh, 23d P. V., Phcenixville, Pa. 

Truesdell, Samuel, Col., 65th N. Y., New York. 
'Truesdell, Samuel, Jr., New York. 

W. 
Wetherill, John M., Lieutenant-Colonel SJ(1 P. \ '., Pottsville, Pa. 
Wallace, Wm. J., Lieutenant- Colonel 23d P. \'., Philadelphia, Pa. 
2 Wallace, Mrs. Colonel, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Walz, John W., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Williams, Cranmer, j,v\ P. V., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Wills, Alfred, Rancocas, N. J. 
Wills, foseph, Rancocas, V J. 

'Wilson, I B., Kane,,,, is, N. J. 

Woodhi ad, [ohn, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Woodhead, Mrs. John, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Weldon, [ames, Philadelphia, Pa. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 383 



WYldon. Mrs. fames, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Wray, William J., 23d P. V., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Wray. Miss Emma I.. Philadelphia, Pa. 
'Willsey, Robert A., Philadelphia, Pa. 
'Woodruff, Colonel John B., New York City. 
'Woodruff, Mrs. Colonel, New York City. 
Wageman, Mr., New York City. 
Wells, John. 23d I'. V., Rancocas, N. J. 

White, Jos. H., 23d P. V., Easton, Md. 
-White, Mrs. Jos. H., Easton, Md. 
"White, Miss Laura V., Easton, Md. 
-Westcott. John, Philadelphia, Pa. 
'Walker, R. Frank, Philadelphia, Pa. 
"Walker. Mrs. R. Frank, Philadelphia, Pa. 
"Walker, Master Robert, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Williams, Captain Chas., S2d P. V., Philadelphia, Pa. 

White, Wm. A., S 2 d P. Y., Philadelphia, Pa. 

White, Mrs. Wm. A., Philadelphia, Pa. 

White, Alexander, 826 P. V., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Waterhouse, Captain Geo. W., S2d P. V., Philadelphia, Pa. 
3 Waterhouse, Mrs. Captain, Philadelphia, Pa. 
'Waterhouse, Charles W., 82d P. V., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Waterhouse, Mrs. Chas., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Weaver, Cains A., i22d N. Y., Syracuse, N. Y. 

Wilkins, Capt. A. W., i22d N. Y., Fayetteville, N. Y. 

Wilson, P. M., New York City. 

\Vils.,n, Mrs. P. M., New York City. 

Y. 

Young. John, 23d P. Y., Philadelphia, Pa. 
2 Young, Mrs. John, Philadelphia, Pa. 
-Young, William, Philadelphia, Pa. 
-Young, James, Pittsburg, Pa. 



384 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



ORATION 



Delivered at Twenty=third Pennsylvania VoIun= 

teers' Reunion of Gettysburg held 

at Philadelphia, Pa. 

AT the Reunion of the Twenty-third Pennsylvania Volun- 
teers, held in celebration of Gettysburg, in Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, July, 1888, Rev. James G. Shinn, Chaplain, de- 
livered the following oration : 

The assault on the heights of Fredericksburg, made by our 
troops under General Burnside, attended, as it was, by appall- 
ing loss of limb and life, and the inefficient and halting ad- 
vance upon Chancellorsville made by General Hooker, tended 
to foster in the minds of the rebels a contempt for the Union 
commander if not for the Union forces. The Army of the 
Potomac came to be regarded as quite an insufficient match for 
the Army of Virginia. This and other motives prompted 
General Lee to plan the invasion of the northern loyal States. 
By one grand campaign General Lee and his secession con- 
freres at the head of the flower of the rebel forces would bring 
the war to a conclusion and determine, for all time, the success 
of the secession of the Southern States and the permanency 
of that oligarchy which was to be built up upon the corner 
stone of a perpetuated human slavery. With such a General 
as Robert E. Lee, with such Lieutenant Generals as Longstreet, 
Ewell, and A. P. Hill, and with such soldiers as composed the 
Army of Virginia who, by repeated trial, were judged " com- 
petent for anything, " the success of this campaign of invasion 
was, from the start, already deemed secure. But when fallible- 
man is most confident, defeat is often most certain. God 
rules, not man. Man proposes, but God disposes. The oft 
repeated cries of the down-trodden and oppressed had entered 
into the Lord of Hosts and he had come forth to effect their 
deliverance and right their wrongs. The time had passed 
when any government founded upon human slavery could 
stand secure, much less that one whose acknowledged corner 



'ENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



385 




stone was the perpetual slavery of man. God has willed the 
deliverance of all, and who can thwart the purposes of the Al- 
mighty Ruler of the universe? 

General Lee began his movement of invading the north- 
ern loyal States, on the third of June, by sending McLaws' 
division of Longstreet's Corps 
and, also, Hood's division, to 
Culpepper, C. H On the fourth 
and fifth of June Ewell's Corps 
followed. A. P. Hill's Corps 
was left to occupy the heights 
of Fredericksburg. General 
Hooker, who had been antici- 
pating that some important 
movement was about to take 
place, arrived at some knowl- 
edge of its general direction 
by the cavalry battle at Brandy 
Station, a battle in which, for 
the first time, the main cavalry 
force on both sides fought 
in regular cavalry style. This 
battle made known Lee's pres- 
ence in force at Culpepper, and also revealed his pur- 
pose of invasion. Before this cavalry battle at Brandy 
Station, in order to test the strength of the force behind 
Fredericksburg, on the morning of the fifth, the Pontoniers 
were ordered by General Hooker to throw two bridges across 
the Rappahannock at Franklin's Crossing, and on the sixth 
of June, the Twenty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, with the 
Sixth Corps, broke camp near Falmouth and crossed the 
Rappahannock for the third time near Deep Run, and was 
immediately placed upon the skirmish line, close up to the 
enemy's works, where they remained until the thirteenth. 
Here heavy skirmishing was kept up from behind breast- 
works and rifle pits with considerable loss to the Sixth Corps, 
though with little loss to the Twenty-third Pennsylvania Vol- 
unteers. On the thirteenth the Sixth Corps recrossed the 
Rappahannock and started on its march north. The weather 
was intensely hot and the marching very oppressive. Having 
learned something of Lee's movements, but not fully under- 



CHAS. E. SMALLWOOD, 

RICHARD J. MILLER, 
Co. G. 



386 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



standing his plan, General Hooker, on the eleventh, sent the 
Third Corps to Rappahannock Station and Beverly, and 
ordered the cavalry forward to observe the upper forks of the 
river. But General Lee had sent the left of his army under 
General Ewell into the Shenandoah Valley, and march- 
ing down this valley at the rate of seventy miles in three days, 
appeared suddenly and unexpectedly before Winchester on the 
thirteenth. Two of these large divisions attacked Winchester 
while one, that of General Rhodes struck Berry ville. On Sun- 
day morning, the fourteenth, Ewell's attack upon Milroy's 
position began, and on Monday morning at one o'clock Gen- 
eral Milroy, after spiking all his cannon and abandoning his 
sick and wounded to the enemv, began his disastrous retreat. 
Berryville was taken, Harper's Ferry was evacuated, the whole 
of the valley was cleared of Union troops and this great high- 
way was fully opened for the advance of the rebels through 
Maryland and into Pennsylvania. General Hooker, now fully 
aware of Lee's plan, marched rapidly past Bealton, Warrenton, 
Catlett's Station and Fairfax, until Manassas was reached. 
Here he remained several days, awaiting the further develop- 
ment of Lee's plans. As soon as the Corps of Hill and Long- 
street reached the lower part of the valley, Ewell's Corps on 
the 2 2d, crossed the Potomac at Williamsport and Shepherds- 
town, and by two columns, moved on Hagerstown, thence 
they passed the border of Pennsylvania, moved up the Cum- 
berland Yallev, and on the following dav, reached Chambers- 
burg. The cavalry of Jenkins had gone in advance of Ewell 
and made his exacting levies upon this rich region, while Im- 
boden, with his troops, had done its work of destruction upon 
the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad and the Chesapeake and Ohio 
Canal. Vast herds of cattle and droves of horses were collected 
and sent southward and heavy subsidies were levied upon the 
towns. Thousands of rich farmers and their cattle and horses, 
were fleeing north, and crowds of colored people, who knew 
full well the cruelty of the slave-holder, were escaping from 
the enforced bondage threatened, and, in not a few instances, 
cruelty inflicted. 

After the rebels, under Longstreet and Hill had crossed 
the Potomac, the Army of the Potomac, on the 25th and 26th 
of June; crossed at Edward's Ferry and moved to Frederick, 
Maryland. About this time, General Hooker, desirous of add- 



PENNSYL\ \.\IA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



387 



ing to the number of his troops for active service, requested 
General Halleck, commander of all the forces, to send him 
some of the troops at Washington, and when this was refused, 
requested that the force under General French, at Harper's 
Ferrv, be added to his command. This, too, was refused. 
His proposed plan of operating against General Lee's line of 
communication was also disapproved. Being thus thwarted 
in all his plans by the authorities at Washington, he, — in dis- 
gust — resigned his command of the Army of the Potomac. 

This resignation was immediately accepted. Some of us, 
who on this march remembered President Lincoln's pithy say- 
ing "it is no time to swap horses when swimming a river," felt 
a natural solicitude for the cause, but when we heard that 
General George G. Meade, a Pennsylvanian, then command- 
ing the 5th Army Corps, had been appointed to the command 
of the Armv of the Potomac, we felt equally relieved. We 
knew that he was capable and efficient and truly loyal, and 
would do all that he could in this time of great peril. General 
Meade immediately took command and ordered such move- 
ments of the different corps as 
the exigencies of the case and 
his plan of the campaign 
called for. 

The several positions of 
the different army corps on the 
1st of July were as follows : — 
The First Corps was at Marsh 
Creek only about five miles 
from Gettysburg, the Second 
and Third Corps were at Tan- 
eytown, the Third having 
orders to march to Emmetts- 
burg to relieve the Eleventh 
Corps which was directed to 
join the First Corps at Gettys- 
burg. The Twelfth Corps was 
at a place called Two Taverns ; the Fifth was at Han- 
over and the Sixth was thirty-five miles from Gettysburg 
to the right at Manchester. Kilpatrick's and Gregg's Di- 
visions of cavalry were at Hanover. The plan of General 
Meade was so to move his troops as to cover and protect 




LAWRKXCE CORN, 
Co. E. 



388 HISTORY OF THK TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



Washington and Baltimore, and, at the same time lie threat- 
ened to break the line of communication of the rebel forces 
with Richmond and thus compel them to turn from their march 
northward and eastward and give him battle at some field well 
chosen for its strength as a defensive position. The field 
chosen by General Meade was that of the ridge bordering 
upon Pipe Creek. This ridge divided the waters flowing into 
the Potomac from the waters flowing into the Chesapeake 
Bay. In these last movements of his army corps his design 
was to throw them out in fan shape so that he could quickly 
draw them back, if need be, and concentrate them upon this 
chosen line of Pipe Creek. But God, the Providential Dis- 
poser of all events, wisely and kindly made the choice of the 
stronger position at Gettysburg, and He so ordered the 
different successive steps that the strong position at Gettys- 
burg was chosen and held by the Union troops and the rebels 
were compelled, by the stress of circumstances, to engage in 
battle there, and there dash and break themselves upon the 
natural ramparts of that God-selected stronghold. Now for 
the battle. And first let us take a bird's-eye view of the 
ground. Gettysburg is the centre of many converging roads 
and is thus the position to which troops from different points 
can be readily concentrated. Looking at the lay of the land, 
we notice several different ridges more or less elevated and 
these, in the main, trending in a north and south direction. 
Some of these ridges terminate in peaks or hills. Gettysburg 
lies at the base of one of these ridges. At the distance of half 
a mile to the west of the town is Seminary Ridge, so called 
from the Lutheran Theological building located upon it. A 
mile further west two parallel swells of ground arc seen 
trending north and south. These are separated by W'il- 
loughbv Run, an affluent of Marsh ('reek. To the south of 
Gettysburg is Cemetery Ridge, so called from the Cemetery 
on that part of the ridge immediately south of the town 
This ridge has two limbs, the longer running directly south 
and terminating in the two eminences called Little Round Top 
and Round Top. The two hills, especially the one called from 
its form, Little Round Top, command the whole oi this north 
and south line. The other limb of Cemetery Ridge, the shorter, 
extends in a southeasterly direction and consists mainly ol a 
succession of hills of which Culp's 1 1 ill, connected with Ceme- 



'ENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



389 




tery Hill, is the most important. The hill to the northeast is 
Benner's Hill. This last formed a pan of the rebel line. 

When General Lee was suddenly informed that the Union 
Army had crossed the Potomac and was marching so as to 
threaten his communication with Richmond, he at once turned 
and ordered his different corps 
1. 1 concentrate in the neighbor- 
hood of Gettysburg. He had 
not chosen this as his field of 
battle, he only availed himself 
of the converging roads to 
concentrate his troops there. 
Hill's Corps and Longstreet's 
Corps were moving easterly 
from Chambersburg and Fa- 
yetteville. Ewell's Corps, 
which had advanced partly to 
Carlisle and partly to York and 
the Susquehanna river, had 
been recalled and was return- 
ing partly by the road leading 
south from Carlisle and partlv by that leading southwest from 
York. The division of Heth of Hill's Corps moving easterly 
had started early on the morning of the ist of July, partly 
to occupy the town of Gettysburg and particularly to supply 
themselves with shoes. They did not expect to meet any 
strong force there. But General Buford, commanding two 
brigades of Union cavalry, had reached Gettysburg the even- 
ing before and had determined to check the rebel advance as 
long as possible, expecting that General Reynolds who com- 
manded the left of the army would come to his support. 
Taking advantage of the remaining light of day. General 
Buford posted his brigades most advantageously, Gamble's 
brigade across the Chambersburg road and the brigade of 
Devins across Mummasburg road. By dismounting his men 
and using them as infantry armed with carbines, sending out 
a strong line of skirmishers and by planting his batteries so 
as to enfilade both roads, he stood ready to hold them in 
check until reinforcements should arrive. And check them he 
did until General Reynolds himself arrived in advance of the 
First Corps. At the time of his arrival General Buford was 



MARTIN WARNER, 
Co. C 



390 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



up in the belfry of the Seminary building anxiously watching 
the progress of the battle and awaiting with intense anxiety 
the arrival of the First Corps to relieve his hard pressed troop- 
ers when he heard the voice of Reynolds calling him. Buford 
and Reynolds were of one mind as to the general plan of op- 
eration. Soon after the army crossed the Potomac General 
Reynolds had said to General Doubleday that it was necessary 
to attack Lee's army at once in order to prevent him from 
plundering the whole State. As a Pennsylvanian his blood 
grew hot at the thought of the invasion and devastation of his 
native State. As soon as Cutler's Brigade of Wadsworth's 
division of the First Corps came up, General Reynolds ordered 
the infantry to relieve the hard pressed cavalry. In the midst 
of a hot fire the line was formed. Reynolds went forward to 
direct. He himself skilfully posted Hall's Second Maine bat- 
tery on the road and threw forward two regiments in advance 
upon the left. At the same time he directed General Wads- 
worth to post the three other regiments on the right of the 
road. While he was thus in the very front, directing in the 
posting of another brigade — Cutler's, a ball fired by a rebel 
sharpshooter struck him in the back of his head and came 
out in the front causing instant death. He fell dead. Not a 
word escaped him. " Thus fell," says the Comte de Paris, "the 
most remarkable man among all the officers that the Army of 
the Potomac saw fall upon the battlefield during the four years 
of its existence." General Meade could say " He was the 
bravest of them all." His untimely death — he was only 43 
years old — was not without benefit to his country, for by mak- 
ing a vigorous fight in the battle which cost him his life, he 
secured the possession of Cemetery Hill to the Army of the Po- 
tomac against which the full tide of the Southern Army broke. 
The death of General Reynolds did not materially change 
the tide of battle. Upon this first day of the battle, which 
was also the first of July, successes on the Union side were 
followed by reverses. For a time the whole of the First Corps 
under General Doubleday steadfastly, and, in the main, re- 
pulsed the divisions of General Hill advancing from the West. 
The capture of the rebel Brigadier-General Archer with several 
hundred of his brigade, and the capture, by Cutler's Brigade, 
of two Mississippi regiments which had taken refuge in the 
Railroad cut, were among the successes. But by over- 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



391 



powering numbers pressing upon them, especially by 
the arrival of Ewell's Corps from Carlisle and York, the 
First Corps was driven bark. The Eleventh Corps, 
General Howard's, about 1 1 o'clock came to their help, 
but they, also, were outflanked and driven back to 
and through Gettysburg, with the loss of several thousand 
men. The first day's battle was, in the main, disadvanta- 
geous, to the Union side. After hard fighting and after 
heavy losses, by the force of greatly superior numbers, thev 
were driven back. And yet when driven, thev assumed much 
stronger positions from which they could not be dislodged. And 
the very successes achieved by the rebels proved a snare to 
them ; the successes incited to increased efforts, which failing 
entailed great loss upon them. The successes achieved and 
the thirst for blood created by the first day's contest compelled 
the continuance of the battle. In the face of these successes 
it was morally impossible for General Lee to draw back. It is 
asserted on seemingly good authority that when General Lee 
planned the invasion of the North he promised his Corps 
commanders that he would not seek an offensive battle but 
by compelling the Federals to 
attack him, he would fight on 
the defensive. But now he is 
so far in that he cannot well 
get out ; he must, by the pres- 
sure of the attending circum- 
stances, persevere in this fight 
even though he dash his army 
to pieces against the stony 
ramparts of Gettysburg. Nor 
is General Lee alone in this 
eagerness for battle, the officers 
and men of his army are full of 
fight. As Swinton says: "Such 
were the exsufrfate and blown 
surmises of the army, and 
such was the contempt of opponent engendered by Fredericks- 
burg and Chancellorsville, that there was not in his ranks a 
barefoot soldier in tattered gray but believed that General 
Lee could lead him and the Confederate Army into Baltimore 
and Washington, if not into Philadelphia and New York." 




THUS. I, CHADWK'K. 
Co. C 



392 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIKI) REGIMENT 



"To have withdrawn, therefore, without a battle was morally 
impossible." The time for the exoneration of the Army of 
the Potomac had come, and, with it, the deliverance of the 
North from its great peril. It is related in ancient fable that 
the kingly athlete Antaeus, a child of Neptune and Terra or 
the earth, in his contest with Hercules was strengthened anew 
as often as he touched the earth from which he had sprung, 
so was it with the soldiers of the North, especially with the 
si ins of Pennsylvania ; they received strength as they touched 
their native soil. They were energized with new vigor and 
fired anew with the just ambition of defending their friends 
and their homes. Never did the men of the Twenty-third 
Pennsylvania Volunteers march better or perform better work 
than when their faces were turned North and their own 
Pennsylvania called forth their loyal zeal and hearty service. 
That march was made by some of you, as your Chaplain can 
testify, with bare and bruised and bleeding feet and yet never 
did the men of the Twenty-third march better. And this is 
applicable to the Sixth Corps and of other Corps. 

The long march from Manchester to Gettysburg, thirty- 
six miles, increased to forty miles by mistaking the road, 
occupied all the daylight of July ist, all that night, and nearly 
all the day of July 2d. Our regiment reached the battle- 
field near Little Round Top, as the big red sun was fast 
declining to his setting and then, after such a continuous 
march, with a hurrah, went directly to the front to the sup- 
port of the Fifth Corps. 

The confusion following the reverses of the first day, 
had, in part, been rectified by the prompt and efficient action 
of General Hancock, whom General Meade, after hearing 
of the death of General Reynolds, had sent forward to take 
command. It was his report to General Meade, after return 
in»;, that secured the choice of Gettysburg as the field for the 
approaching battle. It became General Meade's choice by 
stress of circumstances ; as a foregone conclusion. Already 
had the God of Providence, in kindness, made the choice and 
pointed out the spot by the clear and inevitable logic of 
events. General Meade's original choice was the line of Pipe 
Creek, and this line he preferred even upon the close of the 
second day's fight at Gettysburg when dissenting from the 
general decision of the council of officers who unanimously 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 393 

voted to st;iv there and fight it out, he said : " Have it your 
own way, gentlemen, bu1 Gettysburg is no place to fight a 
battle in." Hut we are anticipating. We are now concerned 
with the opening events of this second day at Gettysburg. 
Upon receiving the report of General Hancock, General 
Meade at once directed all the Corps to concentrate on Gettys- 
burg. The march of the several Corps was a hurried one. 
The van of the Third Corps, Sickles', reached the field at 
sunset of the first day, and the rear of this Corps on the 
morning of the second daw The Second Corps, distant thir- 
teen miles at Taneytown, reached the field on the afternoon of 
the first day, in time to be placed in position by General Han- 
cock himself. The Fifth Corps, at Union Mills, twenty-three 
miles away, after this long night's march, arrived on the 
morning of the second dav. And the Sixth Corps, at Man- 
chester, thirty-six miles distant, by the most strenuous efforts, 
marching a dav, a night and the greater part of the following 
day, from early on the first through to the afternoon, late, on 
the second, arrived just in time to render much needed help. 
But, as we all well know, Uncle John Sedgwick, as he was 
familiarly called, and his boys of the Sixth Corps could do 
great things in times of great emergencies. General Meade 
ordered his own headquarters to be removed to Gettys- 
burg and he himself arrived there at i o'clock, A. M., and 
although it was yet night, he with his staff, under the light of 
the moon, traversed the field, and judged of its strong and 
weak points. Though he was impressed with the strength of 
the position he was also impressed with some of its weak 
points. As the several corps arrived, on this second day, they 
took the several positions assigned them. The Twelfth 
Corps, General Williams temporary commander as General 
Slocum had command of the right wing, was placed on the 
extreme right on Culp's Hill. The Eleventh Corps, General 
Howard's, occupied Cemeterv Hill immediately south of the 
town of Gettysburg. To this they had fallen back after the, 
to them, disastrous fight of the preceding day. Shurz divi- 
sion was stationed across the Baltimore Pike road ; Steinwehr's 
on the left ; and, on the right and rear General Barlow's com- 
manded by General Ames. The First Corps, on this day 
commanded by General Newton, was divided ; Wadsworth's 
division was on Culp's Hill to the right of the division of 



394 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



Ames. General Robinson's division, to the left of the divi- 
sion of Steinvvehr's, held across the Taneytown road as 
far as to Zeigler's grove, while General Doubleday with his 
division, was in the rear of Shurz. The combined artillery 
of the Eleventh and Second Corps was protected bv 
such works as they were able to throw up. South of 
Zeigler's grove, General Hancock, on the afternoon of the 
ist day had placed his own Corps, the Second, and had 
prolonged the left of this, as far as the Round Tops, with such 
troops as he then had at his disposal. After the Third Corps, 
General Sickles' came up, it took position to the left of the 
Second Corps. And, later still, the Fifth Corps, General 
Sykes', prolonged the left to its utmost extent. The position 
of the Sixth Corps, when, after its long march, it reached the 
field, was, for a part of the time in the rear of Little Round 
Top and was held for special work as a general reserve for 
the whole army. Having thus given the positions of the 
several corps, we remark that General Sickles, dissatisfied 
with the direct southerly extension of the left, because of its 
weak points, and because of the advantages which it afforded 
the enemy in his front, changed his north and south line to 
the line of the Emmettsburg road. Unwilling to take the 
responsibilitv upon himself, he applied to General Meade 
who first gave him general and indefinite direction and then 
at his particular request for an engineer to survey the ground 
General Meade sent General Hunt, Chief of the Artillery, 
who went out with General Sickles to the ridge upon 
which the Emmettsburg road is situated and then 
General Sickles directed that his troops should be posted 
upon the line of that road with his centre at the Peach 
Orchard which was a mile to the North of West of Lit- 
tle Round Top. His right wing, under General Humphreys 
extended along the Emmettsburg road, his left wing, under 
General Birney, after making a right angle at the Peach Orch- 
ard, bent around so as to cover Little Round Top at its base. 
This change in the direction of the Third Corps line, made it 
longer, weaker and much more exposed to attack and mater- 
ially affected the contest of the second day. General Lee's rebel 
forces were, at daybreak of the second thus posted, Ewell's 
entire corps held the left, General Johnston's division rested on 
Rock Creek, Early in the centre and Rhodes on the right. His 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 395 

Corps occupied the town of Gettysburg. General A. P. Hill's 
Corps held Seminary Ridge, Heth's division on the right along 
the ridge, and Pender on the left. The two divisions had fought 
on the first day, Anderson's division being one and one-half 
miles back. A large part of Longstreet's Corps formed the ex- 
treme right of the Confederate army. These were the dispo- 
sitions of the confronting forces. All the morning and a part 
of the afternoon were spent in arranging and strengthening 
the Union line. Batteries were placed in position to add materi- 
ally to the strength and efficiency of the troops. After recon- 
noitering the Union position, General Lee determined to make 
the chief attack upon the Union left, especiallv upon the line 
of Sickles' Corps the most exposed and the weakest. At the 
same time that this attack upon the Union left was to be made, 
he ordered General En-ell, on their left, to make an attack upon 
the Union right in order to prevent the sending of reinforce- 
ments from the right to the left. At about half past three o'clock, 
just as a council of Corps Commanders was assembling at Gen- 
eral Meade's Headquarters, the battle opens. Clark's battery 
fires the first shot and this draws upon Sickles' left and centre 
a terrible concentrated artillery fire. General Sickles im- 
mediately rides back to his command and General Meade 
rides with him. General Meade, who sees the line of the Third 
Corps for the first time, objects to its position but thinks that 
it is now too late to change it. The rebel division of General 
Hood is on the right and the division of McLaws follows. The 
rebel line is longer than the left of the line of the Third Corps 
and extends beyond it towards the Cemetery Ridge. The im- 
portance of the position of the two Round 1 ops, particularly 
of Little Round Top, induces General Hood to extend his line 
very far towards Cemetery Ridge so that he may flank the 
Union line and penetrate between the two Round Tops and 
thus obtain the possession of the key of the whole Union line. 
Brigadier-General Law of Hood's division strengthened by two 
additional regiments hold this advance. They press hastily 
forward to seize the prize. In front of Little Round Top is only 
one regiment of the Third Corps left, the Fourth Maine. The 
Sixth New Jersey, the Fortieth New York and the Second U. S. 
Sharpshooters, in the gorge of Plum Run, help in the defence. 
They form an ambush and valiantly, for a little time, check 
the advance of General Law's troops. They lose ground in this 



396 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



unequal contest. Bv their falling back, the approaches to Lit- 
tle Round Top are uncovered. General Ward, whose brigade, 
looking South, has the left of the Third Corps, takes troops 
from his right to strengthen his left and cover these regiments 
in falling back. Winslow's battery renders efficient help. De 
Trobriand's front is now assailed while Ward, on his left, is 
driven back with great loss. The rebels under General Laws 
once more begin the ascent of Little Round Top. The rebel 
division of McLaws, on the left of Hood's division, by direction 
of General Lee, was to follow Hood's division in this attack. 
McLaws now comes forward. Kershaw is on the right of his 
line, then Semmes and then Barksdale, with YYoffords in sup- 
port. At half past five o'clock, Kershaw attacks DeTrobri- 
and's centre and his weak left connecting with Graham. All 
the rebel guns on the Warfield ridge are directed against Gra- 
ham and Humphrevs' troops. In response to the earnest re- 
quest of General Sickles for help, General Meade promises 
assistance from General Hancock's Second Corps and from the 
Fifth Corps of Sykes. The Fifth Corps has just reached 
Gettysburg after a long march and is cooking coffee. Time 
is required for the order to be received and obeyed and the 
troops to reach the field of battle. Time passes and the battle 
presses. At length the division of General Barnes of Sykes' 
Corps reaches the front for the relief of Birney's hard pressed 
troops. Upon these Kershaw's rebel brigade presses, impet- 
uously and General Sykes reinforces them with all the troops 
at his disposal. But what of Little Round Top ? In this furi- 
ous onset and strife has the rebel General Law been able to 
capture Round Top and with this in possession turn the whole 
I'nion left? Never before in the history of this war was there 
a deliverance so signal and so clearly providential. Just as 
the rebel troops of General Law were approaching Little Round 
Top all unprotected, an easy prize to the eager racer, General 
Warren, engineer on General Meade's staff, was climbing this 
hill to get a better view of the battle and judge of its action. 
Just as he reached the top he saw the men of the Signal Corps 
who had been signaling from its summit, folding up their flags 
and about retiring. They had discerned unmistakable evidences 
of the masked approach of these rebel troops. A shot from a 
Union batterv sent by Warren's direction across their line of 
approach clearly revealed their uplifted heads and glittering 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 397 



bayonets. This momentary view makes known to General 
Warren the presence of these stealthily approaching troops 
and reveals to him their design. He at the same instant comes 
to an appreciation of the vital importance of Round Top to 
the Union line. He sees that this position must be held at all 
hazzard. Xo time is to be lost, not a moment. Troops for its 
defence must be sought and sought at once. To impress the 
enemy with the idea of a force now there for its defence, War- 
ren directs the signal men to continue to wave their flags, 
while he hurries to bring troops to defend it. Having ob- 
served the movement of the division of General Barnes going 
to the relief of Birney's line, he immediately detaches Vincent's 
Brigade, and orders them to hasten to Little Round Top. He 
also obtains the co-operation of Haslett's Battery. In his anxiety 
and eagerness General Warren quickly ascends Round Top 
again to watch the approach of the enemy and await the com- 
ing of Vincent for its defense. Every minute seems an hour 
The troops for its defense seem to move very slowly, too slowly 
in Warren's judgment, to meet the exigency. He hastens to ob- 
tain new help. Meeting Ayre's division going to the front he 
appeals for help. This appeal is made directly to Colonel 
O'Rorke of the One hundred-and-fortieth Xew York, a young 
brilliant graduate of West Point — a friend of Warren, 
who immediately lends him help. With their assistance Has- 
lett's Batterv is dragged and lifted up to the summit of Round 
Top. In the meantime, Vincent's Brigade has reached the as- 
cent to Little Round Top and has posted his regiments on a 
ridge about half the way up, the Sixteenth Michigan on the 
right below the summit, the Forty-fourth Xew York and 
Eighty-third Pennsylvania in the centre and the Twentieth 
Maine, Colonel Chamberlain commanding, on the left. These 
troops have arrived and taken position just in time. Xot a 
minute could have been spared. The rebel troops of Law's 
Brigade having emerged from a severe battery fire which for 
a time had delaved — at this very instant start up the ascent of 
Round Top and impetuously attack the troops of Vincent. 
Unable in this onset to break Vincent's line, they outflank his 
right and assail the Sixteenth Michigan with such vigorous 
impetuosity that it is unable to withstand the assault. How- 
can assistance be obtained ? These troops of Vincent on Lit- 
tle Round Top seem entirely separated from the rest of the 



398 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



line, and no help seems to be at hand. The vital position 
of Round top seems to fall into their hands. There 
seems to be no sufficient defence. This however, is 
only in the intervention of a kind Providence and 
by the energy and promptness of General Warren, Colonel 
O'Rorke and his long line of New Yorkers have reached the 
top, together with Haslett's Battery, and this in the very nick 
of time. Though they have made the direct ascent so quickly, 
and, at a full run, have reached the summit, they have not a 
minute to lose. To meet the rebels who have turned Vincent's 
right, and drive them back, thev have not time to load, nor to 
form in line, nor even to fix bayonets. O'Rorke urges them 
to the attack. Receiving the fire of the front rank of their 
assailants, which causes not a few to fall, they rush down upon 
the approaching rebels with clubbed muskets. This action 
causes a check. Then follows the fire of musketry. Vincent's 
regiments having recovered from the attack now come to the 
assistance of O'Rorke's regiment. Haslett's battery, too, 
though it cannot depress his guns sufficiently to fire upon the 
rebel troops ascending Round Top, fires at the rebel troops in 
the valley, and this encourages the brave defenders of Round 
Top. And thus Round Top is rescued from this imminently 
threatening danger. And yet the contest continues. They 
watch each other. They aim from behind rocks and bushes. 
To get a better shot, some climb trees. Two guns of Smith's 
Union battery throw their shells among the ascending rebels. 
The dead and wounded fall and disappear among the rocks. 
Officers and men realizing the vital importance of the struggle 
perform prodigies of valor. The rebel General, Law, not 
satisfied with the fire of musketry, which may be prolonged, 
brings his force against the One-hundred-and fortieth New 
York, which by its prompt action, had stopped his progress. 
Hut Vincent hastens to their help and this attack, too, is 
repulsed. The combatants, at length, become exhausted. 
Somewhat later Vincent's troops are reinforced by Weed's 
brigade of the Fifth Corps, just as the battle on Round Top is 
about to be renewed. The young and dashing O'Rorke has 
fallen. Just as these reinforcements come up General Vincent, 
also, is mortally wounded. General Weed takes position 
upon the right lint has not time to deploy his battalions. 
Colonel Chamberlain to check the advance of the rebels has 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 399 

placed the Twentieth Maine, composed of strong backwoods- 
men, to secure the defile between the two summits against 
which Law now directs all his efforts. The contest is renewed 
along the whole line. General Weed, who sets an example to 
all around him, is mortally wounded near Haslett's Battery, 
and Haslett, stooping to receive the last words of General 
Weed, is struck in his turn and falls lifeless upon the body of 
his chief. Nearly all the officers are either killed or wounded. 
But the enemy also becomes exhausted. In order to outflank 
and surround the Union left he has too much extended his 
line. Colonel Chamberlain, discerning its weakness, charges 
it, repulses it and takes more than 300 wounded and prisoners. 
While these events are taking place at Little Round Top 
somewhat in advance along the line held by General Sickles, 
a most determined fight is taking place. General Ward's 
Brigade, on the extreme left, has suffered the first onset. Then 
the brigades of DeTrobriand and Graham, and, last of all, the 
Division of General Humphreys. Though the angle at the 
Peach Orchard is held by eleven regiments, many of them 
veterans of the fighting Kearney, they are unable to resist 
this violent onset. Upon this is concentrated the fire of many 
batteries, and the line surfers from a battery which delivers a 
most destructive enfilading fire. Rebel troops flushed with 
success assail it in overpowering numbers. Such an angle, 
exposed to such fires and to such assaults, cannot hold out. 
The brigades of Sweitzer and Tilton lend their efficient aid ; 
four batteries of the reserve artillery strengthen the three 
already in position ; Caldwell's Division of Hancock's Corps, 
with the brigades of Cross and Kellv in front and those of 
Zook and Brooke in rear, — and then the division of regulars 
consisting of the brigades of Day and Burbank and commanded 
by General Ayres who had been at the turning point of so 
many battles, all came to the assistance of this fiercely-assaulted 
line and fought with the most determined and heroic courage, 
but only to suffer severe loss, and, at length, to be driven to 
the line of Cemetery Ridge. After the left and the centre of 
Sickles' Corps was thus broken and driven the division of 
General Humphreys, also, which formed the right, was com- 
pelled to change front, and then to fall back to the line of Ceme- 
terv Ridge. Though General Hancock brought yet other 
troops, and General Meade himself brought forward Lock- 



41 III 



HISTORY OF ['HI-". TWKNTY-THIRD RECIMHNT 



wood's Maryland Brigade, the line of Humphreys was forced 
thus violently back. At the time that this took place there was 
a daring advance on the part of the rebel brigades of Wilcox, 
composed of Alabamians, and of Wright, made up of Geor- 
gians, who, having pierced the Union line and finding no 
effective force interposing, advanced through a hot artillery 
fire until they reached the very crest of Cemetery Ridge and 
actually pierced the Union centre. Hut General Webb met 
them with such staggering volleys and with such an impetuous 
charge that they were driven back again with severe loss. 
Inasmuch as General Hood, who had led the assault against 

Little Round Top, had been 
wounded, General Longstreet 
himself, late in the day, leads 
a final charge against this 
stronghold upon the Union left. 
But while reconnoitering the 
Union positions and discerning 
the strong positions of the 
troops, and particularly recog- 
nizing the presence of the four 
brigades of the Sixth Corps 
which had been advanced to 
the front, and well knowing 
that the rest of Sedgwick's 
Sixth Corps was at hand as 
reserves, he gave up the 
thought of attacking again 
such strong positions so strongly held. 

Tliese actions on the Union left were not the only ones on 
the second day. A determined and partially successful attack 
was made by the rebels of Ewell's corps against the forces on 
Culp's Hill and Cemetery Hill. In order to stem the torrent 
of fierce assault upon the left, this day, General Meade had 
greatly weakened his right. All the troops of the 12th Corps 
of Slocum, except the brigade of General Green, were taken 
from Culp's Hill and sent to the assistance of General Sickles. 
While these troops wen- away, General Hayes' brigade on the 
right and Hokes' brigade on the left, with Gordon's brigade in 
reserve, advanced against Cemetery Ridge. Von (iilsa's divi- 
sion and the division of General Ames, in advance, en 




JOHN MOONEY, 
Co. B. 



PENNSY1 \ Wl \ VOL1 NTEER INFANTRY. mi 



closing the batteries oi Ricketts and Weiderick, on higher 
ground, behind them, received this assault. The batteries 

of .Stewart, Reynolds and Stevens, rendered most efficient 
help. The rebel right, though meeting with determined 
resistance, advanced up to the crest of Cemetery Ridge 
and took the battery of Weiderick and spiked two of 
Ricketts' guns. Hut though at Inst successful it was against 
determined opposition. Col< inel Wainwright had given orders 
not to retreat, but to fight the guns to the last. The battery 
of Stevens poured a terrible fire of double canister into their 
ranks — the Thirty third Massachusetts opened a very effective 
oblique fire. The batteries, though penetrated, will not sur- 
render. " Dearer to the cannonier than life itself, it is said, is 
the gun he serves," and these brave men light hand-to hand, 
with rammers, hand-spikes and even with stones. " Death on 
the soil of our native State, rather than lose our guns.'' 
General Hancock, hearing of this attack, sent Carroll's 
brigade to the rescue. This was joined by the One Hundred 
and Sixth Pennsylvania and some reinforcements from 
Shurtz's division. They came over the hill and went in with 
a shout. The enemy anticipating only disaster, being with- 
out reinforcements, fell back. As they retreated the artillery 
opened a most destructive fire, and with such deadly effect 
that out of 1750 men of the Louisiana Tigers only 150 
returned. 

But the rebel troops of Johnston in their advance upon 
Culp's Hill were more successful. Masked behind the thickets 
of Rock Creek they made their stealthy approach. Though 
bravely and persistently opposed by the brigade of General 
Green which was stongly entrenched, they found the works 
constructed by General Geary's men vacant. These they took 
possession of and held through the night. During the 
night both sides are strengthened. The four brigades of 
Geary's troops return about 1 1 o'clock and are much 
surprised to find the rebels in possession. Union batteries 
are placed in position so as to enfilade the rebel position. 
General Kane's brigade making a detour reaches the position 
defended by General Green. The division of General Williams, 
increased by the arrival of Lockwood, is waiting for daylight 
to renew the battle. The Sixth Corps, too, furnishes supplies 
and sends the brigades of Shaler and Neill to the extreme left 



402 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REC.IMENT 



along- the east side of Rock Creek. The rebel Johnson, too, 
has been re-enforced by Smith's old brigade, Rhodes' old brig- 
ade and the brigade of Daniels — raising their force to seven 
of their large brigades. The battle begins with the light. 
The Union troops are determined to drive them out of these 
positions. They must be driven out before they discover their 
nearness to the Baltimore Pike. At early dawn the artillery 
opens fire. After firing about fifteen minutes the artillery fire 
ceases to allow the infantry to advance. But the rebels antici- 
pate this movement. Formed in three compact lines close to 
each other they hurl themselves against the Union troops with 
great impetuosity. They come to recognize their nearness to 
the line of the Union retreat, if retreat they must, and also 
their nearness to the supply train. On this road they see strag- 
glers and non-combatants making their way in haste and con- 
fusion. This sight greatly stimulates their ardor. The shock 
and clash of arms is terrific. A desperate struggle takes place 
among the rocks. Upon the positions exposed all the artillery 
opens fire. On the south of the Baltimore Pike General Sedg- 
wick is putting his brigades there into line that he may check 
the enemy should he advance into the open plain. The contest 
continues and yet loses none of its desperate character. Gen- 
eral Stonewall Jackson's old soldiers are not willing to back 
down even though the contest is against them. At last after 
seven hours' fighting they determined to make a most deter- 
mined effort to break Geary's lines so as to reach the Baltimore 
Pike. But they find that not only are Geary's troops steadfast 
but that these have been re-enforced by General Kane's brigade 
and our own brigade under General Shaler. The rebel Gen- 
eral Stewart having extended his line to the Creek heads the 
assault and his men follow into the concentrated fire — Ruger's 
skirmishers on their Hank open a murderous fire, while Geary's 
troops strengthened by others steadfastly resist the assault. 
Thev arc repulsed. Then immediately Ruger crosses the 
stream against the enemy while Geary makes a direct ad- 
vance into the wood, and the enemy is driven out of the en- 
trenchments. Three stands of colors and 500 prisoners prove 
the success oi this combined movement — Culp's Hill is cleared. 
At the time the action ceases on the Union right at Culp's 
Hill the heat of the sun has become intense. But neither heat 
nor cold suspend the shock of arms. Intense as is the heat, 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 103 

the pressure upon the leader of the rebel invading forces is 
yet nic ire intense. With army composed of the very best of 
the rebel troops, most of them veterans — all highly elated 
with the successes achieved and sure of certain victory, — Gen- 
eral Lee has turned to meet the Union Army and brush it 
away from his conquering path. But at the hands of that 
Union Army he has met with a most stubborn resistance. 
Though by the massing of superior numbers, he, on the first 
day, drove back the Union forces from their advanced 
positions, and, on the second day, by taking advantage of the 
faulty position chosen by General Sickles and his long and 
weak line, — by the same massing efforts and concentration of 
artillery fire, he drove back this portion of the Union line, yet 
these successes have been achieved at very great cost and with- 
out any lasting advantage. The Union line has fallen back hut it 
has been to the very strong position on Cemetery Ridge. 
There it has entrenched itself. And now if he will succeed, he 
must drive this army out of its strong position. This strong 
position General Lee has assaulted at its extreme left at the 
Round Tops, and there has met with signal failure and great 
loss. Again he has assaulted this strong position upon the 
Union right and has there met with a most stubborn resist- 
ance and has after seven hours' contest been driven out. It 
remains for him to make trial of the Lmion centre. He cannot 
yet retreat. The temporarv successes by the rebel assaulting 
columns inperfectly supported, leads him to the conclusion 
that an assault made by a very strong body of select troops 
duly supported will be able to pierce the Union centre and dis- 
rupt the right and left of the Union line. This accomplished, 
victory will be complete. This is the great plan. This is the 
stupendous effort to be made. Since seven or eight o'clock 
General Lee has been busv in assigning places to the troops 
that are to make the assault. General Longstreet endeavors 
to persuade him to adopt the plan of turning the Union left. 
Should he turn the left, he would secure his own line of retreat 
while he could interpose between the Lnion forces and Wash- 
ington. But General Lee has determined upon attacking 
the Union left centre. That part of the line was indicated bv 
the position of Ziegler's Grove on Cemetery Ridge. The 
troops selected for making this attack is the division com- 
manded by General Pickett. Having reached Gettvsburg 



404 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 

they are fresh for the fight and are full of enthusiasm. At 10 
o'clock they take position near the Peach Orchard. Heth's 
division, now under General Pettigrew was to advance on the 
left of Pickett's division and join in the attack on the Union 
line. The force of General Wilcox was ordered to support 
the right of Pickett. A very marked feature of the plan of at- 
tack was assigned to the rebel artillery. At daybreak Col- 
onel Alexander, who had charge of this portion of the rebel 
artillery posted six batteries along the line of the Emmetts- 
burg Road. The other batteries of the Rebel First Corps was 
posted by Colonel Walton so as to make a slightly concave 
line of seventv-five pieces of artillery, stationed at the distance 
of 900 yards to 1300 yards from the Union line. The batteries 
of Major Henrv were placed to the right so as to cross their 
fire with the rest of the Rebel guns. Somewhat in the rear of 
these are posted the Washington Artillery with Dearing and 
Cabell's batteries. All these guns, uniting their fire with some 
of Ewell's. are to batter that portion of the Union line which 
the division of Pickett and the associated commands intend 
to assault. All these preparations consume the time up to 1 
o'clock. The Union troops have been wondering at the pro- 
tracted silence upon this part of the field. The hot sun beats 
down upon their heads, but no sound of battle is there heard. 
Suddenly, at 1 o'clock, two guns — signal guns — are fired, 
which to the expecting assaulting column say. " be on your 
guard, be ready.'' And then suddenly — opens the most furi- 
ous fusillade of artillery that this New World has ever heard. 
Who of us who then heard it. will ever forget it? To the 
seventy-five pieces of artillery of Longstreet's Corps there was 
added sixty-five pieces of A. P. Hill's Corps — making 13S 
pieces of artillery, which at the signal given belched forth their 
smoke and horrid deafening roar and hurled upon the Union 
line their death-dealing missiles. The very hills, solid as they 
are, seem to shake beneath the concussion. And what is the 
effect upon the Lnion line? Is it caught in a surprise? I> it 
stunned and overwhelmed by the shock? They are not over- 
whelmed. From the time that the contest on the Union left 
closed the preceding evening. General Meade assisted by Gen- 
eral Hancock, has been occupied in rectifying and strength- 
ening the line. General Hunt, in particular. Chief of the 
Union Artillery, has with untiring zeal, been busy in examin- 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



ing the batteries and their ; - - The batteries of the re- 

e artillery have been consolidated. At the extreme le: - 
the line two batteries crown the steep ridge of Little Round 
Top. In the depression, this side. McGilvery is posted with 
ei"ht of the reserve batteries. On the front of the Second 
5 M r Hazzard has placed four batteries, one on the left 
and the others under Arnold. Gushing and Brown on the high 
ridge. Finally on the ridge, a regular batten.- has been 
oned. Colonel Osborne on this line, has command of 
fiftv pieces. In addition to all these five batteries are held as 
reserves readv to come to the front and join in the action. To 
of the rebel guns eighty of the Union pieces are 
readv to replv. General Hunt gives order that they keep 
back their fire for fifteen minutes : that they select the point 
against which their fire will be concentrated. At the expira- 
tion of these minutes, the eighty guns reply. More than 200 
cannon on these two sides engage in this artillery batde. 
Who of vou can imagine the terrible roar, the violence of the 
concussion, the whizzing of the shot, the screaming and burst- 
ing of the shells ? The rebel fire is in volleys, all their batter - 
at once ! Well directed they produce a great eiTect. The 
Union fire is regular and is quite destructive. The position of 
the Union troops, in a depression, while it screens from view, 
furnishes little protection from this fire of the enemy. The 
rebel shells burst in the midst of supply trains, batteries and 
ambulances : the horses struck totter and fall. General 
Meade's Headquarters are riddled with balls. General But- 
terfield, Chief of Staff, is wounded. In every direction men may 
be seen seeking shelter behind the slightest elevation in the 
ground. Nothing is heard but this fearful roar and this explo- 
sion of shells. The Union Infantry remain quiet under this 
fire and endure the trial with great composure. The artilleri- ts 
though most exposed, are sustained by their action a mi d the 
excitement. But caisson after caisson is exploded and as the 
smoke of the explosion rises, it attracts the attention of the 
enemv and the rebel veil of exultation is heard for miles along 
their extended line. But the rebel side. too. suffer not a little. 
Thev have been obliged to move back their ammunition 
waeons. Manv have met their death and more of them have 
been wounded. After nearly two hours have thus been spent 
in this dreadful war of the guns. Generals Meade and Hunt 



406 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



order a cessation and prepare for the onset of the rebels which 
they well know will soon follow. When the Union fire ceases 
the rebels vainly imagine that their fire has compelled this 
silence and they regard it as a partial victory. They hasten 
their preparations. And yet on the part of General Long- 
street who doubts the success of the attack there is hesitancy 
and delay. But General Lee has ordered it and his order 
must be carried out. General Pickett who commands the 
column of assault is eager for it. His men are confident of 
victory. When all is ready General Pickett looks to General 
Longstreet to issue the order and he yet hesitates. General 
Pickett proudly says " I shall go forward, sir." And now as 
the soldiers rise from the ground to form ranks many cannot 
rise. The ground is strewed with the dead, the wounded and 
with those who have been overcome with the intense heat. 
But all the able bodied men rise and take their places in line. 
Full of ardor they move forward with measured pace, so as 
not to break their allignment. Pickett's division moves with 
Garnett's brigade in the centre, Kemper's on the right and 
Armistead's on the left. A swarm of skirmishers covers their 
front. The smoke which enveloped them and shut off their 
view has cleared away and they can now see the Union line 
towards which they are marching and upon which they are to 
make their assault. This assaulting column of Pickett's di- 
vision numbers 4500 effective men. By the addition of troops 
of Pettigrew, Trimble and Wilcox, on the right and the left 
which are to support Pettigrew, the whole number of troops 
assaulting is raised to 14,000. The issue of this hard fought 
battle of Gettysburg upon which so much, both to the rebel in- 
vading troop, and to the Union cause is depending is now at 
hand. The success to the rebels means the continued inva- 
sion of the northern loyal States with disaster heaped upon 
disaster to the Union cause — and discomfiture to the rebels 
betokens the lifting of the dark cloud of war and discomfiture; 
means the turning of the tide and incoming of success. On, 
on ! come the rebels marching solidly and quietly in magnifi- 
cent order. Friends and foes alike watch their movement, as 
they pass over the space intervening, and accord them the ad- 
miration which their courage and soldierly bearing merit. 
Their friends anticipate nothing but victory. On the Union 
side there is solicitude, courage and linn determination. As 



PENNSYLVANIA V( >LUNTEER INFANTRY, 



4il7 



soon as the rebels emerge from their sheltering woods and 
thickest smoke, McGilvery concentrates the fire of his forty 
cannon upon them. Perhaps some of them think of Freder- 
icksburg under Burnside. These death-dealing missiles do 
their deadlv work. Though suffering from this artillery fire 
the rebels close up their ranks and move on. The distance 
over which thev must pass is about a mile and a half. Haz- 
zard having expended all his ammunition of long range is 
obliged to reserve his fire until they come nearer. As they 
approach, encouraged by the silence of Hazzard's guns Gen- 
eral Pickett crosses several enclosed fields until, at length, he 
reaches the base of the elevation of attack. Then he changes 
his direction by a half wheel to the right and makes a halt to 
rectifv his lines. This is disastrous to the rebel plan. By this 




Tin is. W. SNOWDEN, 

ALEX I'. WILKINS, 

Co. B 



LEWIS STKENXER, 

DANIEL CRAEBER, 



movement the distance between General Pickett's division and 
the supporting troops of General Heth is much increased. 
These bv their imposing appearance, at the distance of 250 
yards, draw the Union fire and stop to reply. The troops of 
Wilcox, too, on the right of General Pickett did not move out 
with the same promptness as the centre column and he has 
moved straight forward. As Pickett's division in its forward 
movement descends into a hollow and becomes involved in 
the smoke, Wilcox following along his direction to the right 
becomes separated from Pickett and does not, as General Lee 
intended, cover the flank of Pickett's division. This is a most 



108 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



important and providential result, and is highly favorable to 
the Union side. The central and chief assaulting column is 
not properlv protected and is not adequately supported. It is not 
as fully prepared to deal the stunning blow designed upon 
the Union centre. The objective point of the Union line is 
Ziegler's wood. This part of the ridge, besides the wood is 
protected on the west by rocks which project like a wall. 
Stone walls and fences, too, serve for shelter and protection. 
Here Hayes' troops are posted and the division of General Gib- 
bon. The two Union lines are so arranged that the batteries 
of the second line can deliver their fire over the first line. In 
the salient angle of Ziegler's woods, General Doubleday has 
placed Stannard's Vermont Brigade. It is against this position 
so strong and defended by troops so well posted, the rebels 
are advancing for attack. They will meet with an obstinate 
resistance. Pickett is beginning to realize the peril of his 
situation. He is separated from his supporting columns and 
must attack alone. On his left Pettigrew is not up, and, on 
his right, Wilcox strays away. And yet he comes boldh on. 
He does not waver. The gaps made by the shot and shell 
of the Union artillery onlv caused them to close up their ranks. 
The Union battery on Little Round Top which enfiladed their 
lines, from which they suffered considerably, led to the like 
closing up of their lines. At the fence occupied by the skirm- 
ishers of the Second (Union) Corps, near the Emmettsburg 
Road, Pickett's column met the first Union forces ; these they 
quickly drove back. General Gibbon commanding the Union 
front opposed to Pickett's advancing column had directed his 
men to reserve their firing until the enemy was near enough 
to make their fire effective. That fire, thus delivered, was with 
deadly effect. The rebel forces under Pettigrew, on the left of 
Pickett's column, began to waver on their left and fall behind, 
the nature of the ground there was more exposed than it was on 
the rest of their line. The artillery (ire had shaken them mini) 
and this deadly Union infantry fire of Haves' Division sent 
them back in masse-. Through all this Pickett's sol- 
diers advance at the double quick. This fearful fire of 
General (ii I >bon's division thins their ranks. The rebel Gen- 
eral Garnett, whose brigade is somewhat in the advance, falls 
mortallv wounded not a hundred yards from the Union line. 
This lor a moment causes his troops to halt. The brigades oi 



PENNSYLVANIA VOU NTEER INFANTRY. 109 

Pickett, at sixty yards, open lire upon the Union line, but their 
bullets flatten themselves upon the rocks againsl which they 
strike. Halting- a little to allow Armistead's men to get more 
completely in line, they move Eorward under the leadership ol 
their chiefs and scale the acclivity which is before them. The 
veils of the rebels mingle with the lire of their muskets. Hut 
this well directed hie from the Union from the oblique and 
energetic lire of Stannard's forces and those of Gates upon 
his right Hank caused many of his men to surrender, others to 
retreat outright, and others to crowd together. Nevertheless, 
the brigade of Armistead, united with that of Garnett's, pressed 
on. Pickett is determined to break Gibbon's line and capture 
the guns. Webb's front which had been the focus of the 
enemy's concentrated artillery lire which had lost already 
some fifty men ami officers, still remained firm and unshaken. 
The disabled guns — Cushing's battery A, (Fourth U. S. Ar- 
tillery, and Brown's Rhode Island battery,) had been re-placed 
by two fresh batteries and also by Cowan's First Indepen- 
dent of New York, of the Sixth Corps, which had 
come up and taken the place of Brown's battery on the left. 
Armistead, urging his men forward, has reached the rebel 
front between Kemper and Garnett, and these, a compact mass 
of men, bespattered with blood, driven by an irresistible force 
superior to the individual will of the men composing it, throws 
itself like a solid body upon the Union line before it. The 
shock is terrible. It falls, at hist upon the brigades of Hall 
and Harrow, then concentrates itself upon Webb's brigade. 
Webb, in the midst of his soldiers encouraging them, is quickly 
wounded. The struggle is waged at close quarters. The 
rebels pierce the line of the Union forces. But the Union men, 
dislodged from their first position at "the wall," fell back to 
their second line, formed of small earth-works, erected on the 
ridge in front of their guns. These guns fire grape shot upon 
the advancing foes. Hancock and Gibbon bring forward 
all their reserves. Hall to the left of Webb, by means of a 
line rectified by a half wheel to the rear, places his men on the 
flank of the advancing rebels. General Harrow, not being 
directly engaged, advances with his left, and almost takes 
Pickett's advancing line, on the reverse. 

1 his first line of Hayes' Division which received this charge was composed 
of the Twelfth New Jersey, Fourteenth Connecticut and First Delaware. The 
Second line, One Hundred and Eleventh, One Hundred and Twenty-fifth, and 
Thirtv-ninth New York Regiments. 



410 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



The troops, posted on the right and left, hasten towards 
the point threatened. Humphreys sends Carr's brigade to 
the assistance of the Second Corps. The Union regiments 
become mixed, but they are all pressing each other in a 
mass, forming a living bulwark of defence more than four 
lines deep. A clump of trees, near which Gushing, when living, 
had posted his guns, is the point the rebels aim to reach. 
Armistead on foot, his hat perched on the point of his sword, 
rushes forward to attack the battery. To his men he cries, 
" Give them the cold steel, boys,'' but he falls pierced with balls 
by the side of the gallant young Gushing. Hereafter this 
clump of trees, the farthest point reached by the rebels, be- 
comes historical. Thus far and no farther is the fiat of 
Almighty God in their vain efforts to conquer the North and 
extend the limits of Southern slavery. As Pickett's centre 
failed so the column on his left, intended for support, 
failed. Also the column of his right which by continuing on 
its direct couse instead of declining to the left about 45 de- 
grees, thus leaving Pickett's column uncovered and liable to 
attack on its right and thus to greater loss and confusion ; also 
to fail in its unaided uttack on the Union front ; it also failed 
through the splendid and rear attack of Stannard's force who, 
besides inflicting great loss and confusion upon Pickett's ad- 
vancing right, took several hundred prisoners. This attack 
was followed closely by Gates' command which continued to 
fire on them at close range. This caused many to surrender, 
others to retreat, and others to crowd together. The Eighth 
Ohio, which was on picket, overlapping the rebel left, closed 
in on the rebel left with great effect. Still, the next rebel 
brigade, Armistead's — united to Garnett's brigade, pressed on, 
as Pickett was determined to break the Union line under 
General Gibbon, and, in so doing, take the Union guns. Tin- 
Union forces under Webb, having suffered much l>v being 
made the special objects of the rebel artillery lire, still 
remained firm against the coming attack. Gushing s battery 
A, Fourth U.S. Artillery, posted on the Union crest witli 
Brown's Rhode Island battery, had been disabled by the Rebel 
artillery lire, and had been replaced by Cowan's hirst New 
York, of the Sixth Corps' battery, and another, Wheeler's bat- 
tery, came up just before Pickett's attack and took the place oi 
Cushing's. The rebel Armistead pressed forward, leaped the 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. ill 

stone wall waving his sword with his hat on it, followed with 
about a hundred of his men, several ol whom carried rebel 
battleflags. He shouted " Give them the cold steel, boys " 
and laid his hand upon a gun and this, for a few minutes, was 
in his possession, and the rebel flag was in the front waving 
over the Union line. But Webb, animating and encouraging 
his men, was very near Armistead. He led the Seventy-second 
Pennsylvania against the rebel front and placed a line of 
wounded men in the rear of these to hold them to their duty. 
A portion of the Seventy-first Pennsylvania were posted so as 
to throw in a flanking fire, while a great part of the Sixty-ninth 
Pennsylvania and the remainder of the Seventy-first, made 
stern resistance from a copse of trees on the left near where 
the rebels had broken the Union line and were Union men 
were shot with the rebel muskets touching their breasts. A 
splendid charge of two regiments was led by Colonel Hall, 
which passed completely through Webb's line and engaged 
the enemv in a hand-to-hand fight. General Armistead was 
shot down by the side of the gun he had taken. It is said his 
last words were " Tell Hancock, I have wronged him, and 
wronged my country." Gibbon and Webb were wounded 
and the loss in Union officers and men was very heavy. Two 
rebel brigadiers were killed and more rebel prisoners were 
taken than twice Webb's brigade ; also six rebel battleflags 
and 1463 muskets were gathered in. General Doubleday sent 
stretcher-carriers and ambulances to care for the Confederate 
wounded. When Pickett, the rebel leader, looked at the top of 
the ridge he had temporarily gained, he clearly saw that it was 
impossible to hold this position, Union troops were rushing in 
upon him from all sides. The Union Second Corps was en- 
gaged in a furious assault upon his front. His men were 
fighting with clubbed muskets and even banner-staves were 
entertwined in a fierce and hopless struggle. The Confederate 
Pettigrew, on his left, had given way and a heavy Union 
skirmish line began to accumulate on that flank. He saw 
his men surrendering in masses, and with a heart full of 
anguish he ordered a retreat. Death had been busy on all 
sides, and comparatively few of his advancing column now 
remained and these in disorder fell back behind the Confeder- 
ate Wright's brigade sent forward to cover their retreat. 



412 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 

A small rebel force rallied in a slashing that had been cut 
down by our men to accommodate the Union artillery fire, but 
when two regiments of Rowley's brigade, the One Hundred 
and fifty-first Pennsylvania and the Twentieth New York 
State Militia under Colonel Theodore B. Gates, made a gallant 
charge they drove them out. 

While this contest of the rebel centre and left in front of 
the Union forces under Webb was carried on, the rebels on the 
right of the advancing column had advanced in their own 
direct route and thus separated themselves more and more 
from Pickett's column and, at a delayed period of time, had 
been deployed by its leader and had opened a feeble fire 
against Caldwell's division on the left of the troops under 
General Doubleday. This furnished Stannard an opportunity 
to repeat his successful flank fire against these also. De- 
taching the Fourteeth and Sixteenth Vermont regiments, he, 
with them, opened a disastrous flank fire upon the left of the 
advancing column. The rebel Wilcox, thus struck on his left, 
while a long line of batteries on his front tore his front to 
pieces with cannister-shot, found it impossible for his troops 
to gain a foothold. He found his column exposed to a de- 
structive cross fire and was obliged to retreat. A large body 
i if his men were brought in as prisoners. 

A portion of Lon^street's corps, — Robertson's and Law's 
brigades advanced against the two Round Tops with the view 
of preventing the sending of troops from that position to 
strengthen the force resisting Pickett's charge. Kilpatrick 
interfered with this. About 2 P. M. he made his appearance 
on the Union left with Farnsworth's brigade, and Merritt's 
Brigade of Regulars with Graham's and Elder's Regular bat 
teries. His design was to attack the rebel right and reach 
the rebel ammunition train in that vicinity. Rebel report is 
that his men came on yelling like demons. Driving back the 
rebel skirmishers on that flank Merritt's men, deployed on the 
left, soon became engaged with Anderson's Georgia Brigade 
supported by two batteries. Farnsworth on the right, with 
his First Vermont regiment, leaped a fence and advanced 
until he came to a second stone fence, where lie was checked 
b\ Law's Fourth Alabama Regiment, on its return from a 
demonstration against Round Top. Farnsworth, turningand 
leaping another fence, amidst shol and shell made an attempt 



PENNSYLVANIA V< lU'NTLK K INFANTRV 



41! 



tn capture Bachman's rebel battery. In this effort Farnsworth 
was killed, and the First Vermont, finding itself enclosed in a 
field with high fences on all sides, behind which rebel infantry 
were continually rising and tiring, was broken up and forced 
to retire in detachments. This attack of Farnsworth hindered 
the sending of any rebel troops to Pickett's force. 

The repulse of Pickett's force with such slaughter and 
loss, destroyed the rebel dream of conquest and led to the 
retreat of Lee's army across the Potomac, with the Sixth 
Corps in their rear as far as South Mountain, where, amid a 
downpour of rain and the thick darkness, our Brigade spent 
the night. On that mountain top three or four Twenty-third 
Pennsylvania Volunteer officers sheltered themselves in the 
garret of a house, glad of a protecting roof over them. There 
one of the Chaplains lost a flask of brandy which he had been 
carrying in his saddle bag for the wounded soldiers. Thankful 
for the shelter enjoyed, he said nothing, made no inquiries. 
Some on the outside in the pelting rain warmed themselves 
and kept out the cold. Although the risen Potomac delayed 
Lee's crossing, he succeeded in getting across with forces and 
trains. This ended the Gettysburg campaign. 




CALIFORNIA JOE OF BERDAN'S SHARPSHOOTERS. 



414 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



Names and .Addresses of all Known Survi- 
vors of tKe Twenty-tHird Pennsyl- 
vania Infantry 

Those marked with * were of 3 months' service. 

field and Staff 

Colonel John F. Glenn, 2535 Brown Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Wm. J. Wallace, 1432 South 49th Street, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

Adjutant Thos. K. Boggs, Flushing, New York. 

Quartermaster Sergeant Wm. II. Albertson, 24 South 7th Street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Regimental Band 

Cobbin, Thomas, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Roth, John, 1716 South 6th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Wiley, Benj., Wilmington, Del. 

Company j\ 

Bateman, J. J., 4254 North Franklin Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Branson, Ed. R., 533 Dickinson Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Barry, Albert B., 2308 Cedar Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Brabender, Fd. A., 216 West Wildey Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Colwell, James, 17 12 North 26th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Davenport, Henry H., 244 Line Street, Camden, N. J. 

Fritsch, Henry G., 7031 Wright Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

• '.arson, Lewis F. , 804 Champe Street, Denver, Col. 

Huber, Charles F., 212 Washington Square, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Hilton, Wm. F., Box 685, Hartford, Conn. 

Havens, Joseph, 2525 East Norris Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Murray, Charles, Soldiers' Home, Dayton, 0. 

Martin, Sylvester H., Adj., Soldiers' Home, Erie, Pa. 

Martin, James, Soldiers' Home, Va. 

McCormick, Michael, 1630 South Rosewood Street, Philadelphia, I'a. 

*North, George W., 4513 Haverford Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Patton, John, 41 X. Paxson Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Patterson, James, Post 1 < i. A. R., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Powell. Geo. II., 308 South State Street, Chicago, 111. 

Quigley, Wm. J., ( (akland, Cal. 

Sexton, John F.. 655 North 39th Street, Philadelphia, I'a. 

Shutruter, Win.. Table Rock, Adams County, I'a. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. H5 



Speckman, Louis J., Berwyn, Chester County. Pa. 
Stengel, Phili|i, Fox Chase, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Tustin. Isaac, Moorestown, N. J. 

Company D 

Blanck, Ge<>. W., 351 PineStreet, Camden. X. J. 

Bohn, John. Box 173. Lehighton, Pa. 

Barbour, Jas. H., 1444 North 27th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Connelly, Frank A., 1807 X. Judson Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

C,ut\-, Henry A., Callao, Peru, South America. 

Costi llo, John, fto6 Spring Garden Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Dorn, Then. H.. 1329 South 29th Street. Philadelphia, Pa. 
Drew, Henry G., 420 South 17th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
*Fitzinger, George YY., Matawan, N. J. 
(iraeber. Daniel, 341 1 Ridge Avenue, Philadelphia. Pa. 
Gardiner. David, Soldiers' Home, \'a. 

Gillespie, James, Penn Street, Manayunk, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Granello, Geo. W., Lebanon, Pa. 

Hillebrand. Louis. 108 South 8th Street. Philadelphia. Pa. 
Hahn, Frank I).. Brockport, New York. 
Hohvorth, Henry. 3633 North 16th Street, Philadelphia, Pa 
Jenkins, B. F. . 2041 South 10th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Lampter, Lewis, 3829 Nice Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Mooney, John. 14S Market Street, Chicago. 111. 
McKim, Henry, Burlington, N. J. 

*Xe\vberg, Robert. 2318 Ridge Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Peddle, Wm. R.. Pension Bureau, Washington, D. C. 
Peifer, F. Geo., 2040 Cherry Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Peacock, Henry C. 2207 Tow nsend Street, Philadelphia. Pa. 
Snowden, Thomas YY. , 1901 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Sewell, James, 3742 Evans Avenue. St. Louis. Mo. 
Thomas. R. B. . 1246 Xorth iSth Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Tuder. John F., Hammonton, X. J. 
Thalheimer, Albert, 141 Cedar Street, Reading, Pa. 
Wilkins, Alex., Soldiers' Home, Dayton, O. 

Company C 

Bauer, John, 2125 Xorth 9th Street. Philadelphia, Pa. 
Brown, John, Bull Head Hotel, Wilmington, Del. 
Collins, James P., Beartown, Lancaster County, Pa. 
Chadwick, Thomas I.. 2042 Fitzwater Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Callahan. John, Rah way, X. J. 

*Campbell, Peter F., 1913 Pemberton Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Cassaday. Xicholas. Vienna, Fairfax Co.. Va. 
Donnell, Ezekiel, Soldiers' Home, \"a. 



416 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 

Eberhart, Win. F. , 615 W. Venango Street, Philadelphia. Pa. 
Ellenger, Chas. S., Adams Express Company, 17th and Market Streets, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Fell, Thomas, 2505 Fox Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Ford, W'm., Braddock, Pa. 

Gardiner, John, 2723 Philip Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Gilbert, Thomas, 118 Mehl Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Galloway, Geo. W., 167 Fountain Street, Manayunk, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Henry, Daniel, Branch P. O., Westmoreland County, Pa. 
*Landon, John K., 822 Dudley Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Lasage, James, 2233 North 18th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Little, Win., Tacony, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Miller, Wm. H., Henry Clay, New Castle County, Del. 
Marache, Chas. C, 1 1 24 Ridge Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 
McFadden, Neill, West Vincent, Chester County, Pa. 
Nutt, James, 2008 W. Huntingdon Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Staiger, Gotleib, 2016 Berks Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Sigmond, Houston, 725 Watkins Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Spence, Mathew, 211 Pulaski Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Thomas, Wm., 1949 Judson Place, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Tipton, Charles E. , S27 Federal Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Thompson, James, Henry Clay, Del. 
White, Joseph H., Easton, Md. 
Warner, Martin, Columbus, ( ). 

Company D 

Albany, A. J., 103 Cotton Street, Manayunk, Philadelphia, l'a. 
Brown, Charles, Adams Express Company, 17th and Market Streets, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Barr, Samuel, 181 Levering Street, Manayunk, Philadelphia, l'a. 
Boyd, John, Soldiers' Home, Dayton, O. 
Barnes, George W. , Soldiers' Home, Va. 
Buchanan James, Steubenville, O. 
Crawford, Geo. , Soldiers' Home, \'a. 
*Clement, Wm. K., 3926 Aspen Street, Philadelphia, l'a. 
Campbell, Alex., 806 Preston, Houston Street, Tex. 
Campbell, James, Soldiers' Home, \"a. 
Edwards, Wm.. 2^>j Pine Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Fisher, James, U. S. Soldiers' Home, Cal. 
Galbraith, John, rear 1934 Cuthberl Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Gibson, Thomas, 153 Hermitage Street, Manayunk, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Hogg, Charles T., 2855 North 6th Street, Philadelphia, l'a. 
Harvey, Jas. D.. Morris Run, Tioga County, l'a. 
*Huebly, Joe. E., 516 South [2th Street, Philadelphia, l'a. 
Hattrrslcy, Joseph, j Clark Street, Newark, N. J. 



PENNSY1 \ \\1 \ VOLFNTHKR INFANTRY. 117 



Kirkpatrick, John, 23 Winchester Street, Manayunk, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Kennedy. John 11., [637 Christian Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lindsay, John, 1251 South Mole Street, Philadelphia, l'a. 

Mitchell, Geo. P., 213 Mulberry Street, Manayunk, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Marache, Charles C. , 1124 Ridge Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 

McCoy, Henry, 2425 North Bancroft Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

McClung, John, 324S Lancaster Street, 1'hiladelphia, l'a. 

McGee, Thomas, Frankford Arsenal, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Rutnney, John, 4655 Smick Street, Manayunk, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Rivel, Jeremiah, 809 West 7th Street, Wilmington, Del. 

Thwaites, Alfred, Monastery Avenue, Roxborough, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Tippen, George, 219 Mifflin Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Wright, Isaac, Prospect Street, Roxborough, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Wiley, Samuel, 5718 Ludlow Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

*Watts, David, 2042 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Company E 

Baker, Wm. J., 2250 North 15th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Brown, James, 5645 Appletree Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Boyd, John, 131 1 North 23rd Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Boyd, Hugh, 520 L^' South 23rd Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Brown, James, Catharine above 21st Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Brown, Jas. C. . 326 Belgrade Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Blessington, Jas., Yallejo, Cal. 

: Black, Wm. D., 1515 South 19th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Clark, Wm., Court House, Pottsville, Pa. 

Corn, Lawrence, 2031 Morris Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Disert, Robert, Knoxdale, Jefferson County, Pa. 

Dougherty, Wm., 2013 Mayfield Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Egner, Robert, 2046 Westmoreland Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Finley. Wm. , Jacinto, Cal. 

Fow, Daniel, Chester, Pa. 

Gilbert, Jno. , 1452 Point Breeze, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Gibson, James, 918 West Somerset Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Henderson, John, 1905 Wilcox Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Johnson, Adam B., Clifton Heights, Pa. 

*Johnson, Robt. A., 5607 Race Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Morgan, John, 2015 Manton Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Moore, David, McKay's Brickyard, Bridesburg, Philadelphia, Pa. 

:;: McFalls, Samuel. 1326 Pine Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

McGinnis, James, 623 South 19th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

McKinney, Joseph, S07 South 20th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Mc Kinney, Wm., Soldiers' Home, Va. 

McClelland, Richard, 321 East 7th Street, Wilmington, Del. 



418 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



McKinzie, John, Cannelton, Ind. 

Simpkins, Belford, 3020. Oakford Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Smith, Archibald, 2918 W. York Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Tate, James, Detective Department, City Hall, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Tate, Hugh, Phcenixville, Pa. 

Taylor, James, 277 Rebecca Street, Allegheny City, Pa. 

Young, John, Soldiers' Home, Va. 

Company Y 

Atkinson, B. Frank, 4642 Jackson Street, Manayunk, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Boyle, John, 2327 Meredith Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Benson, Geo. A., San Diego, Cal. 

Bothwell, Jas., Soldiers' Home, Va. 

*Brisburn, Jas., E. Haines Street, Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Colville, David, 2342 Spring Garden Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Fassett, John B., 761 West End Avenue, New York City. 

Gwynn, James, New York City. 

Green, William, 827 X. 27th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Graham, Geo., Meridan, Conn. 

Graham, Geo. , W., Soldiers' Home, Ya. 

*Garrett, George, 2636 Germantown Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Henry, James, 13 13 Christian Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Henry, Peter, New York City. 

Kelly, John, 3824 Spring Garden Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lewison, David or Lazarus, 119 West One-hundred and Thirty-third 

Street, New York City. 
Masland, James W. , 2819 North Ninth Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Moffit, John, Mary Street, S. S., Pittsburg, Pa. 
McHugh, Patrick, Wayne Street, Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Powell, Alex, 6323 Baynton Street, Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Parker, James, Sixteenth and Fitzwater Streets, Philadelphia, Pa. 
*Parks, John W., Dallas, Texas. 

Purnell, John H., 120 Locust Street, Allegheny City, Pa. 
Robinson, fohnT., 1919 Christian Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Rodgers, Wm., 754 Florida Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Robinson, Lucian J., 2412 Germantown Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Williams, C. I''.., 173s South toth Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Weaver, Wm. B., Soldiers' Home, Va. 
Wray, Wm. [., [22 South Seventh Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Company G 

Bantom, Wm. II., 1328 Toronto Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Black, Robert, 17117 West Thompson Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
*Beath, Robert 1!., 747 North Fortieth Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. H9 

Chadwick, Wm. I!., Collingsdale, Delaware County, Pa. 
Culbertson, Edward A.. 2132 Wood Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Cavender, Philip, Soldiers' Home, Marshalltown, Iowa. 
*Cunningham, James, [533 Dickinson Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Duswald, Samuel. [673 North Fifty-fourth Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Flennard, Wm. H., 4302 Ludlow Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Fraley, Geo. W. , St. Davids. Pa. 
Kroessen, Jas. C, Post 1 G. A. R.. Columbus, Ohio. 
Miller, Richard J., 2331 Fairhill Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Maholland, W. H., Columbus, Ga. 
MacKinson, G. M., Paschallville, Philadelphia, Pa. 
McClaskey, Henry, 2214 Morris Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
McEldron, W. C. , or W. C. Barclay, Baltimore, Md. 
I Vile. Frank C, 401 1 Haverford Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Robinson, James, 1402 South Juniper Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Roe, Jesse R. S., Joplin, Mo. 

Rutherford. Wm. <"... 1314 Melon Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Smalhvood. Charles E., 1227 North Twenty-seventh Street. Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 
*Speer, Morris 11., 338 Wharton Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Stokley, Joseph, Soldiers' Home, O. 
Smith, Edward J., Colorado Springs, Col. 
Taylor, Frank, Oak Hall, Philadelphia, l'a. 
Yocum, Jacob, Paschallville, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Company H 

Brown, Jas. C. , Soldiers' Home, Va. 

Blanchard, H. F. , Fresno Flatts, Cal. 

Dufford, James, Dorseyville, Pa. 

Everhart, H. W., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Gallagher, John, Opera House, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Hickman, Job. , Bala, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Huber, Wm. L. , 1205 South 16th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Haviland, John, 1340 Spring Garden Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Howell, Geo. D. , Decatur, Texas. 

*Hess, Wm. H. H., 3828 Mt. Vernon Street, Philadelphia, l'a. 

Johnson. John ('.., 14.1,1 Moyamensing Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Jenkins, Benj., 527 West Laurel Street, Pottsville, Pa. 

Linton, John S. , 1 5 19 Dickinson Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lant, John A., Tarrytown, N. Y. 

Milford, Wm. W., 1720 Oxford Street, Frankford, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Michael, Wm. B., 1925 Bainbridge Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

McKenna, James, Pittsburg, Pa. 

McEwen, Lawrence, Connellsville, Pa. 



420 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 

Palmer, Geo. \V. , 1006 Fernon Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pedrick, Dan'l. H., Soldiers' Home, Va. 

Smith, Sherwood B. , Reading, Pa. 

Slaysman, Charles R., Gilroy, Cal. 

*Tompkins, John T. , Colmar P. O., Pa. 

Worth, Frank M., Excelsior, Minn. 

Company I 

Adams, Gilbert, High Bridge, New York City, N. Y. 
Albright, Jacob, Columbia, Pa. 

Boyd, Robert, 1033 Dorrance Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Bayley, Jas. C, 150 Mifflin Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Butcher, Alex. M., 802 Cross Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Berg, John D., 23 Plum Street, Reading, Pa. 
Berger, Abratn, York, Pa. 
*Brazier, Wm., Pottsville, Pa. 

Coakley, C. J., 1507 Bodine Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
*Courtney, John B., 2326 Fitzwater Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Dunbar, Robert S. , Columbia, Pa. 

*Daugherty, John P., 3826 Spring Garden Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
FiNcnberger, Martin, Marietta, Pa. 
PVanklin, John G. , 112 South 5th Street, Darby, Pa. 
Fry, David, Columbia, Pa. 
Goldsmith, Frank, Wrightsville, Pa. 
Gormly, John, 635 West York Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Hernley, A. H., Crawfordsville, Ind. 
Henderson, Jacob, Columbia, Pa. 
Hambright, Chas. K., York, Pa. 
[Avin. Wm., Soldiers' Home, ( ). 

Lomax, Elias, 2028 South 7th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
*Maguigan, Ed. J., 925 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Murphy, Frank, 1234 Butler Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Markley, Sam'l, Mountville, Pa. 
Mitchell, Thos. , Soldiers' Home, \'a. 
Morast, Wm., Soldiers' Home, Danville, 111. 
Mulholland, Robert, 1 136 Day Street, Philadelphia. Pa. 
McFadden, ( )liver, Marietta, Pa. 
Rodgers, Jno. B., Wrightsville, Pa. 
Stull, Ed. I.., Soldier-,' Home, Va. 
Stauffer, Abrm., Washington Borough, l'a. 
Shue, Geo. W., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Sloan, Wm. IX, 5221 Haverford Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Shenberger, fames, Wrightsville, Pa. 
siniili Geo. I-'.. '>2i North Second Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOL! NTEER INFANTRY. 121 



Stevens, Kennedy, -435 North Twentieth Street. Philadelphia, Pa. 
Todd, Jacob, Port Deposit, Mil. 
Williams. Jessie S. . Soldiers' Home, Ohio. 
Will, Norman, Rowlandsville, Md. 

Company 1\ 

Bolestridge, fames J., 2406 Turner Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Colgan, fames, 330 New Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

I>.i\is, Dennis. Soldiers' Home, Ohio. 
Duncan, Wm. , Hatboro, I 'a. 

Farren. Wm. |.. 3225 North 15th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Finley, Wm., Kitchen, Blockley, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Gifford, Alfred H., Galveston, Texas. 
Kreps, Peter, Pittsburg, Pa. 

*Kinsley, Jas. G., 1 ?o Prime Street. Philadelphia, Pa. 
Millman, James K., Philadelphia, Pa. 
McKim, Chas., Burlington, N. f. 

*McIlvain, Wm. H., 736 Federal Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Neille, Wm. H., 578 Herkely Street, Camden, N. J. 
Priest, Charles, 212 North Packer Street, P>altimore, Md. 
Spear, Morris L. , Soldiers' Home, Ohio. 
Simon, Christ. G. . 1819 Ginnodo Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Simon, Jno. F., 1 136 Savery Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Simon, Fred. P., 3102 Frankford Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa, 
Simpson, Geo. L. , 307 Atlantic Avenue, Camden, N. J. 
Williams, Daniel, 203 6th Street, S. F. , Washington, D. C. 
Wei il>, Geo. E. , Bullitt Building', Philadelphia, Pa. 




422 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



List of those of the 23d Pa. Vols, who Died 
since Muster-out of Regiment 



Those marked with * were of the 23d P. V. 3 months' service. 

Field and Staff and Non-Coremissioned Staff 

*Colonel, Charles P. Dare, died at Philadelphia, December, 1861. 
General, (Colonel) Thomas H. Neill, died at Philadelphia, March 12, 

1885. 
Surgeon, George Yeoman, died at Philadelphia, April 17, 1895. 
Surgeon, Wm. C. Roller, died at Hollidaysburg, Pa., March 11, 1897, 
Quartermaster, J. D. Chandler, died at Passaic, N. J., Jan. 29, 1898. 
Chaplain, Rev. Jas. G. Shinn, died at Atlantic City, N. J., Oct., 1903. 
Sergeant-Major, Frank Maguigan, died at Philadelphia, Pa., March, 

1902. 
Quartermaster Sergeant, Oliver Eckert, died at Philadelphia, Pa., 

June 15, 1883. 

Band 

Drum-Major, L. Landenburg, died at Perkasie, Pa. 
Band Master, Thebold Herman, died at Philadelphia, Pa., May 21, 
1886. 

Benj. Wiley, died at Wilmington, Del. 

John Freeman, died at Philadelphia, Pa., August 16, 1892. 

John Birch, died at Philadelphia, Pa. 

James Nicholson, died at Camden, N. J., September 17, 1900. 

Company A. 

Captain, George P. Wood, died at Philadelphia, Pa. 
Lieutenant, William Foster, died at Philadelphia, Pa. 
Lieutenant, Robert McClelland, died at Philadelphia, Pa., November 
28, 1884. 

Blank, William J., died at Philadelphia, Pa. 

Barry, Albert B. , died at Philadelphia, Pa., May 27, 1895. 

Bartley, William, died at Philadelphia, Pa., October 14, 1902. 

Foreman, John, died at Philadelphia, Pa. 

*Govett, Louis, died at Philadelphia, Pa. 

*Hansell, Amos, died at Philadelphia, Pa., November 6, 1890. 

Metcalf, John H., died at Philadelphia, Pa., December 24, 1898. 

McGraw, Michael, died at Philadelphia, Pa., July 1, [894. 

Patterson, Hugh, died at Philadelphia, Pa., July 24, 1901. 

♦Selkirk, Robert, died at Philadelphia, Pa. 

Tully, Joseph M.. died at Philadelphia, January 1, 1886. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 423 



Tobin, Francis, died at Philadelphia, Pa. 

Turner, Alexander, died at National Soldiers' Home, Va. , 1900. 
Turner, William J., died at Philadelphia, Pa., January 28, 1901. 
Williams, William, died at Philadelphia, Pa. , December 22, 1901. 

Company B 

Lieutenant. Henry Crease, died at Philadelphia, Pa., July 17, t88g. 
Bieger, Philip, died at Philadelphia, Pa., July 12, 1901. 
Berg, John I)., died at Reading, Pa. 
Coates, Henry, died at Pittsburg, Pa. 

Fow, Jacob, died at Philadelphia, Pa., December 15, 1892. 
George, Alexander Hamilton, died at Flkton, Md. 
Mathews, Charles W., died at Philadelphia, Pa. 
McConnell, H., died at Philadelphia, Pa., .May 10, 1882. 
Queen, Jacob C. , died at Philadelphia, Pa. 
Rossler, Henry J., died at Philadelphia, Pa. 
Sniyelly, Charles L., died at Erie, Pa., July 24, 1901. 
Shaw, Joseph B. , died at Philadelphia, Pa., January, 1883. 
Sharp, Joseph, died at Philadelphia, Pa., January 26, 1888. 
Simon, Bernard, died at Philadelphia, Pa. 
Sooy, J. A., died at Philadelphia, Pa. 

Stout, A. M., died at Philadelphia, Pa., November 17, 1893. 
Sproal, James J., died at Newton Square, November 1, 1899. 
Taber. J. S. C, died at Philadelphia, Pa. 

Wagner, Benj. F., died at Philadelphia, Pa., August 8, 1895. 
Walters, A. H., died at Philadelphia, Pa. 

Company C 

Lieutenant, Frank Lynch, died at Philadelphia, Pa., June 6, 1S87. 
Lieutenant, John R. Johnson, died at Cleveland, O., August 25, 1895. 

Brown, Charles H., died at Philadelphia, Pa., February 24, 1895. 

Dorsey, Thomas F. , died at Philadelphia, Pa. 

Elliott, Washington, died at Philadelphia, Pa. 

Elliott, Robt. J., died at Philadelphia, Pa. 

Fischler, Sebastion, died at Philadelphia, Pa., July 21, 1885. 

Gardner, Alexander, died at Philadelphia, Pa., December, 1901. 

Holmes, John, died at Philadelphia, Pa., September 23, 1894. 

Jennings, John W. B., died at Tamaqua, Pa. 

Kilrain, John, died at Tamaqua, Pa. 

Larue, Asa, died at Soldiers' Home, Erie, Pa. 

Lapp, John, died at Soldiers' Home, Erie, Pa., June 20, 1903. 

McAllister, John, died at Atlantic City, N. J., September 11, 
1 90 1. 

McCabe, Richard, died at Soldiers' Home, Ohio, March 6, 1896. 

McCabe, John, died at Stafford, Mo., November 1, 1902. 



424 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



Orr, John, died at Brigeport, Pa., May 12, [888. 
Rigler, H., died at Philadelphia, Pa., August 17, 1887. 
Smith, Robt. J., died at Philadelphia, Pa., March 5, 1883. 
Seger, Saml. , died at Bidwell, Cal. , November 3, 1896. 
Thompson, John, died at Soldiers' Home, Cal., October 10, 

1898. 
*Till, Charles S. , died at Soldiers' Home, Erie, Pa., April 24, 

1894. 
Van Brunt, Turnis W. , died at Soldiers' Home, Ohio. 
Wilhelm, A., died at Philadelphia, Pa., December 25, 1885. 
Weeks, Saml. S. , died at Atlantic City, N. J. 

Company D 

Anthony, Jno. P., died at Philadelphia, Pa. 

*Acton, Nathaniel, died at Philadelphia, Pa., November 25, 1902. 

Burton, Jos., died at Soldiers' Home, Philadelphia, Pa. 

*Biles, Geo. W. M., died at Philadelphia, Pa. 

Campbell, Jno. M. , died at Ardmore, Pa. 

Cargill, J. Jno., died at Philadelphia, Pa., June 16, 1896. 

Dougherty, Geo., died at Philadelphia, Pa., February 12, 1894. 

Galbraith, Jno., died at Philadelphia, Pa. 

Holland, Patk., died at Philadelphia, Pa., July 9, 1902. 

James, Wm. , died at Philadelphia. Pa,, May 6, 1884. 

Keely, Jas. , died at Philadelphia, Pa., December 31, 1900. 

Lamon, Martin, died at Philadelphia, Pa., January 16, 1900. 

Moore, Wash. O., died at Philadelphia, Pa., October 14, 1883. 

Milliken, Thos. J., died at New Castle, Del., August 9, 1885. 

McCuen, Jas., died at Philadelphia, Pa., November 24, 1889. 

McCorkel, A., died at Philadelphia, Pa., February 12, 1902. 

Neely, Saml. A., died at Philadelphia, Pa., March 28, 1901. 

Sweeney, Mchl. , died at Philadelphia, Pa. 

*Spear, Kirk, died at Atlantic City, N. J. 

Shaw, Wm., died at Philadelphia, Pa., November 23, 1893. 

Steen, And. E., died at Philadelphia, Pa., May 21, 1897. 

Toland, Neil, died at Philadelphia, I 'a. 

White, Jos., died at Philadelphia, Pa., May 29, [896. 

Wallace, John, died at Philadelphia, Pa. 
Williams, C. S., died at Philadelphia, Pa., December 4, [898. 

Company E 

Acton, Jas. 1'.., died at Philadelphia, Pa., August to, 1896. 
Agnew, Danl. S. , died at Darby, Pa. 

Brown, Thos. C, died at Philadelphia, Pa., February 1, [889. 
Buchanan, Wm., died at Soldiers' Home, ()., June 18, 1900. 
Buchanan, Jas., died at Lananghan Patch. Pa., May [8, 1893. 



'ENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 125 



Carr, C. died at Philadelphia, l'a. 

Ellingsworth, Saml., died at San Francisco, Cal. 

Graham, Jas., died at Philadelphia, l'a., 1904. 

Hance, Geo. W., died at Philadelphia, Pa., July 5, [893. 

Jordan, fas., died at Philadelphia, Pa., December [8, [899. 

Kearney, Wm., died at Philadelphia, l'a.. February 3, 1890. 

Keyes, Wm., died at Philadelphia. Pa., April 24, 1890. 

Kilpatrick. Jno., died at Philadelphia, l'a. 

Lindsay, Wm. II., died at Philadelphia, Pa., June 19, 1901. 

Marshall, John, Sergt., died at Philadelphia, Pa. 

Morgan, Ed. S., died in Philadelphia, Pa., February 18, [891. 

McManus, Jno., died at Philadelphia, Pa. 

Mel-alls, W. J., died at Coehs City, Ind. 

Pitts, Alex., died at Philadelphia, Pa., November S, 1883. 

;;: Purser, Spencer, died at Soldiers' Home, Kansas. 

Rankin, J., died at Soldiers' Home, Va. 

Company F* 

*Capt. J. Keenside White, died at Philadelphia, Pa. 

Atkinson, Jos. I!., died at Philadelphia, Pa., Septembers, 1897. 
Bodkins, Robt. , died at Philadelphia, Pa., August 8, 1902. 
Carrigan, (no. IL, died at Soldiers' Home, Ya., Dec. 25, 1900. 
Cazier, Henry IL, died at Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 12, 1889. 
Doyle, Jno., died at Pittsburg, Pa., October 21, 1S97. 
Donnelly, Dan'l, Sr. , died at Soldiers' Home, O. 
Donnelly, Dan'l, Jr., died at Soldiers' Home, O., Nov. 11, 1891. 
Earle, Jas. T. , died at Philadelphia, Pa., January 18, 1S96. 
Fisher, Julius, died at Gill Hall, Pa., December 15, 18S7. 
Flanagan, Wm. R., died at Philadelphia Pa. 
Graham, Jas. H., died at Philadelphia, Pa., June 4, 1888. 
Hunterson, Jno. \\, died at Philadelphia, Pa. 
Hickey, Patrick, died at Kansas City, Mo., October 19, 1885. 
Johnson, Alex., died at Philadelphia Pa., August 11, 1901. 
Keesey. W. N., died at Marion, Minn., March 28, 1902. 
Lukens, Thos. L. , died at Marion, Minn., March, 1898. 
Lukens, Chas. P., died at Philadelphia, Pa., January 24, 1897. 
Love, Jas. P., died at Philadelphia, Pa., January 6, 1886. 
McGarvey, Wm. H., Corporal, died at Philadelphia, Pa. 
McGarvey, James, died at Philadelphia, Pa. 
McCabe, Peter, died at Soldiers' Home, Milwaukee, Wis. 
Miller, Casper, died at Dover, Del., March 26, 1901. 
Whiteman, Jacob M., died at Philadelphia, Pa., Feb. 29, 1S96. 
Wert, Wm. A., died at Soldiers' Home, Ya. 

Company G 

Capt. Jno. Maxwell, died at Philadelphia, Pa., January 17, 1902. 



426 HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 

Allibone, Thos., died at Philadelphia, Pa., April 8, 1898. 

Barclay, Wm. C. , died at Baltimore, Md. 

Bunker, Alfred, died at Burlington, X. J. 

Boyd, Andrew, died at Philadelphia, Pa., March 20, 1885. 

*Baugh, Louis G. , died at Philadelphia, Pa. 

Davis, Jno. S. , died at Philadelphia, Pa., December 10, 1895. 

Fisher, Fred. K., died at Philadelphia, Pa., January 18, 1887. 

Gibson, Jno., died at Philadelphia, Pa., October 9, 1902. 

Griffith, Rich'd A., died at Philadelphia, Pa., March 9, 1886. 

Highley, Wm., died at Philadelphia, Pa. 

Haddock, Henry, died at Soldiers' Home, Ya., May 29, 1902. 

Hilsee, Robt. C, died at Philadelphia, Pa., August 18, 1890. 

*Howard, Geo. W., died at Philadelphia, Pa., October 6, 1892. 

Johnson, Geo. W., died at Philadelphia, Pa., March 23, 1896. 

Kerr, George, died at Philadelphia, Pa., 1903. 

Mackenson, Geo., died at Philadelphia, Pa., 1898. 

Mills, Jno., died at Soldiers' Home, Ya., November 5, 1890. 

Nacy, Jas. , died at Philadelphia, Pa., September 26, 1886. 

Patterson, Robt., died at Philadelphia, Pa., February 24, 1886. 

Poole, Jefferson, died at Philadelphia, Pa., January 26, 1890. 

Roe, Wm. R. , died at Brandt, Pa., January 26, 1901. 

Sperry, Sam'l R., died at Harrisburg, Pa., January 17, 1900. 

Sarch, John, died in Philadelphia, Pa., July 4, 1S97. 

Company H 

Captain, James M. Craig, died at Pittsburg, Pa., February 9, 1899. 
Bailee, A. I)., died at Philadelphia, Pa., October, 1890. 
Blanck, Wm., Sr. , died at Camden, N. J., January 11, 1891. 
Forsythe, Colin, died at West Elizabeth, Pa., September 11, 

1887. 
Michael, Thos. H., died at Philadelphia, Pa., June 19, 1890. 
McDennott, Phillip, died at Philadelphia, Pa. , November 26, 

1895- 
Roach, Jno., died at Odessa, Neb. 
Robinson, Wm., died at Philadelphia, Pa., 1903. 
Spence, James, died at Philadelphia, Pa., April 28, 1903. 
Schall, A., died at Philadelphia, Pa., October 28, 1882. 
Slaysman, Geo., died at Sprague, Wash., May 6, 1903. 
Smith, Jas. M., died at Philadelphia, Pa., February 6, 1902. 
I'ber, David H., died at Philadelphia, Pa., March 19, 1903. 
:!: \Vatermyer, Jno. \Y., died at Philadelphia, Pa., November 2, 

1898. 



PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 427 



Company 1 

Albertson, Sam'l W., died at Philadelphia. Pa., August 28, 1884. 

Brooks, Geo., died at Marietta, Pa., September, 1894. 

Christy, J no. , died at Columbia, Pa., November 12, 1885. 

Daley. Jas. , died at Philadelphia, Pa. 

Grannelo, Frank, died at Grand Rapids, Mich. 

*Jobbins, Joseph, died at Philadelphia, Pa., 1903. 

Lee, John, died at Peach Bottom, Pa. 

Moss, Madison B. , died at Paradise, Pa. 

Stephens, Wm. , died at Philadelphia, Pa., February 22, 1888. 

Sipple. Benj.. died at Washington, Pa. 

Wright, Chas., died 1887. 

Wike, Geo. W., died at Philadelphia, Pa. 

Company t\ 

Bulmer, Edward, died at Philadelphia, Pa. 

Bishop, Sam'l, died at Philadelphia, Pa., April 27, 1901. 

Cornell, Jesse, died at Galveston, Texas. 

Dinsmore, Jno., died at Philadelphia, Pa., December 13, 1S95. 

Edmundson, H. G., died at Philadelphia, Pa. 

*Fulmer, Michael, died April 19, 1899. 

Gormley, Jno. J., died at New Castle, Del., 1893. 

Howard, Lewis, died at Soldiers' Home, \'a., 1903. 

Joynes, Richmond, died at Philadelphia, Pa., December, 1901. 

Kelly, Thomas, died at Philadelphia, Pa., 1903. 

Kelly, James, died at Philadelphia, Pa., March 2, 1888. 

Lane, Jos., died as East Brady, Pa., 1893. 

Murgatroyde, Jno., died at Philadelphia, Pa., March 19, 1S99. 

: ' : Moore, Robt. , died at Cross Keys, N. J. 

Morad, Peter, died at Philadelphia, Pa. 

McKim, Win., died at Burlington, N. [. 

McKnight, Jno., died at Jersey City, N. J. 

McByrne, Chas., died at Soldiers' Home, \'a., October 3, 1897. 

Sterling, Hugh, died at Wheeling, W. \'a. , February 24, 1902. 

Spear, David, died at Gloucester, N. J. 

Stull, Jno., died at Trenton, N. J. 

Schreiner, Jno. J., died at Philadelphia, Pa. 

Woodhouse, Geo. W. , died at Philadelphia, Pa., December 27, 

1887. 
Wells, Jno. M.. died at Burlington, N. J., October 18, 1894. 
•'Wilson, Aug. H., died at Turnersville, N. }. 
Wilson, Ed. B., died at Philadelphia, Pa., 1904. 

Company L 

Atwood, Dan'l T. , died at Darby, Pa., July 7, 1898. 



428 



HISTORY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT 



Company O 

Duross, Jas. , died at Philadelphia, Pa. , February 18, 1903. 
Carroll, Edwin A., died at Philadelphia, Pa., December, 1885. 
Foley, Jas., died at Philadelphia, Pa. 

Orr, Robt. L. , died at Philadelphia, Pa., November 14, 1894. 
Ryan, Jno. W. , died at Philadelphia, Pa. 

Company F 

Clark, Sam'l, died at Philadelphia, Pa., May 18, 1896. 
Sobbe, Walter, died at Philadelphia. Pa., January 2, 1902. 

Company R. 

Albertson, Levi P., died at Philadelphia, Pa., April 15, 1901. 
Fisher, Jos., died at Philadelphia, Pa., < >ctober 8, 1903. 
Jones, Win., died at Philadelphia, Pa., March 19, 1890. 
Lippincott, Richard R., died at Rancocas, N. J., May 31, I9 01 - 
Steward, Sam'l P., died at Philadelphia, Pa., Mar 22, 1890.. 




PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 4l>9 



TRIBUTE TO THE WOMEN OF THE 

UNION 

There were none who won more deservingly the title of 
heroes than the women of the Republic, while their kin were 
( iff to the front, the mothers, wives, sisters, and other fellow's 
sisters were cheering on the work by their loving messages, 
caring for the sick and wounded, providing for the aged and 
children, bearing all the privations and suffering uncomplain- 
ingly at home. The story of their devotion to the cause of 
their country will never be told. Medals of honor have been 
awarded by a grateful nation to its soldiers and sailors for 
distinguished conduct in action. What shall be the reward of 
these heroic and unselfish women ? While the Government 
cannot grant them recognition for their deeds of valor, the 
Survivors of the Twenty-third can assure them that they have 
the undying affection and veneration of the ones they loved, 
and as part of that great army and navy of the Union, they 
stand at attention and salute them for their heroism. 



ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS. 

Page 60 — On Sth line, should read, U. S. A. 

Page 82 — On 38th line, should read, Ninetieth (goth). 

Page 1S4 — Roll of Co. I, add Corporal Lane died at Camp Graham.. 

Page 187 — Original enlistment killed, should read 108. 

Page 217 — Roll of Co. E, add Graham, James, discharged on Surg. cert. 

Page 236 — List of Co. I, add Lane, Corporal, died Camp Graham. 



NOTE.. 



The thanks of the organization is extended to Comrade John L. Smith, late 
of the 118th P. Y., map publisher, Philadelphia, and to Colonel Noble D. Pres- 
ton, late of the 10th New York Cavalry. Philadelphia, for the use of several 
cuts which appear in this publication. 



430 



INDEX. 



INDEX. 



A 

Around Bivouac Fire 13 

Armstrong, Thos. J., Lieut. ... 45 
Abercrombie, J. J., Brig. Gen. . . 65 
Abandoning Winter Camp .... 75 

Ames, John C 84 

A Wounded Picket too 

Appelgate, David 101 

Along the Chickahominy .... 146 

Albany, Andrew J 170 

Ambulance 173 

Albertson, William H. . . . 150 

Additions and Corrections . . . 429 

B 

Burnside, Ambrose E., Maj. Gen. ^3 

Burying a Comrade 38 

Boyd, John G., Lieut 42 

Buell, Don Carlos, Maj. Gen. . . 53 

Bantom, Henry W 76 

Battery ( '.oing Into Action .... 90 

Born, Peter 99 

Boyd. John 123 

Baker, W. J 152 

Battle of Malvern Hill 157 

Boyd, Robert 174 

Brown, James 280 

Bolestridge, James J 298 

Birney, David B., Col., Maj. -Gen . 1 

Boggs, Thomas K 179 

Bantom, William II 270,355 



c 

Curtin, Andrew G., Governor . . 10 

Craig. James M., Capt 49 

Camp ( ; raham ... • • • 54 

Couch, Darius N., Maj. Gen. . . . 57 

Carroll, John 60 

Clark, George 66 

Capt. Louis Hillebrand, | 

tst Sgt. William R. Peddle, |- . . 80 

Captain Cook, 

Clark, William, Major 10S 

Colwell, James, Lieut. 134 

Crease, Henry 155 

Crawford, George 166 

Colville, I >avid .... . . 171 

Council of Administration .... 277 

( lulberton, Ed. A 288 

Cornell, Jesse 302 

Culp's Hill 308 

Chandler, 1. I)., Quar. Mas. ... 179 
Chadwick, Thomas I. . .270,391 
I anteen, " Miles 1 )'Keill\ "... 247 
Companies L. O. P. R. ■ . . . 248-269 
Company Street, 1 .imp < '.raham . 349 
Crosby, John W., Col 249 

1 haplainShinn's Oration, "Gettys- 
burg" • • 384-4'3 

( Orn, Laurence 3 S 7 

1 alifornia [oe U3 



D 

Delivering Papers 12 

Dougherty, John 94 

Dash, Fire Dog 125 

Davenport, H. M .161 

Dedication of Monument at Gettys- 
burg 287-290 

Duswald, Samuel C 304 

Dare, Charles P., Col 1 

Dorsey, Thomas . 323 

Donahue, Charles 359 



E 



Endorsement 4 

Ernst, Henry . . 82 

Eisenbarth, Ed. F 104 

Eberhardt. William in 

Eckert, Oliver T 150, 273 

Elliott, Robert 300 

Elliott, Washington 300 

Ely, John, Col., Brig. -Gen .... 1 
Ely Medal 335 



Forebaugh, Sol • ■ 34 

Franklin, W. B., Maj. Gen. ... 46 
Festivities in Camp .... 7° 

Fire in Camp 95 

Fassitt, John B., Capt 120 

Fritsch, Henry G., Capt 131 

Fow, Jacob 141 

Fow, Daniel U9 

Field and StaFf at Muster-out . . .179 

Finley, William . . . .- 272 

Farran, William J ■ 277 

Fraley, George W 331 

Fowler, William A 347 

Fullerton, James 37 1 

Familiar Scene, 1S63 374 



Grant, U. S., General 28 

( '.eneral Meade's Headquarters . . 81 

Graham, William 102 

larsed, Joshua S. , Lieut 107 

'.reen, William 164 

.ninths, Richard A., Lieut. . 169 

iibson, James - Sl 

iibson, fohn 2 93 

,lmn, [ohn !•'., Col. ... 1, 179. 270 
traeber, Daniel 277, 407 



INI >EX— G iM im id. 



AM 



H 

Hooker, Joseph, Maj. ('.en. ... 35 

Habbermaker, Thomas 47 

Harp, Jacob 52 

Hazlett, Mathew . 92 

Huber, Frederick . 106 

Henry. James no 

I lever, Jacob, Capt. [35 

Hickman, JobT., Lieut 153 

Huber. Charles F 17s, 277 

Hogg, Charles 177 

1 [ickey, Patrick ....... 178, 295 

Henderson, John 270, 365 

Hahn, John 340 

Howell. George D. . . ... 250 

I 

Introductory 3 

J 

Johnston, James, Lieut 41 

Johnson, William 64 

Johnston, John R., Lieut. . . . 116 

Johnson, Alexander 289 

Johnson, John ('. 305 

K 

Keyes, Erasmus I).. Maj. Gen. . . 43 

Keith, Jacob S5 

Kelly, James 170 

L 

Lincoln, Abraham, The ['resident 5 

Linton, William 39 

Linton, John S 73, 277 

Linnard, James M.. Capt 87 

Little, John E 96 

Little, William R. . 119 

Lynch, Frank, Lieut 124 

Loyal Girl of Winchester .... 165 
List of Battles in which was in- 
curred killed and wounded, 23d 

P. V. . . 187 

List of Killed and Wounded of 

those transferred from 23d P.V. 188 
Lady Friends at Dedication of 23d 
P. V. Monument at Gettysburg. 296 

Lomax, Elias 297 

Lapp, John 329 

List of Names and Addresses of 
Those on the Trip to Gettys- 
burg . 375-383 

List of those of the 23d P. V. who 
have died since the muster-out 
of the Regiment 422-428 

M 

Meade, George G., Maj. Gen. . . 37 

Marchant, Henry A., Capt 44 

Malvern Hill House 58 

Maguire, William S6 

Mullin, James 88 

Myers, William H 91 

Mitchell, George P 117 



M 

Masland, lames 127 

Milford, William W 136 

Moffitt, John 145 

Maguigan, Frank, Sgt. Maj. . . . 160 

Monument, 23d P. V 2S6 

Maxwell, John, Capt 299 

Miller, Richard J 277, 385 

Martin, Thomas S., Capt. . . . 327 

Michals, Thomas H 367 

Mickle, Aden B . 369 

Mooney, John 400 

McClellan, George B., Maj. Gen. 30 

Mil jinnis, John 55 

McKernon, John 69 

McMichael, Hugh 71 

McFadden, Neil 133 

McCorkill, Arch 144 

McKinney, Joseph 167, 277 

McKinney, William 167 

McGinnis, James 172, 277 

Mc Clung. John 281 

McCormick, Michael 294 

McCabe, John 357 

N 

Nio I lay on Picket 4 

Nothing Doing — Game at Cards . 51 

Newton, John, Maj. Gen 59 

Non-commissioned Staff 150 

Neill, Thomas H., Col., Brig. -Gen 1 

Newberg. Robert C 277, 353 

Neville, F. A 150 

Note 429 



Officers — Survivors' Association . 270 

P 

Patterson, Robert, Maj. Gen. . . 9 

Palmer, Dewitt C 89 

Powell, Alexander 114 

Palmer, George W 154 

Patterson, James 275 

Pommer, G. A 2S3 

Palmer, Edwin, Capt 303 

Peifer, George F 277, 336 

Palmore, Stephen 363 

R 

Regimental Commanders .... 1 

Record of Officers and Men of the 

23d P.Y. — 3 months' service. 14-27 
Russell. Albert G. . .... 61 

Russell, David A., Maj. Gen. . . 63 

Reen. John F 72 

Roe, William R 122 

Reminiscences — Camps Graham 

and Birney 126-127 

Reminiscences — Warwick Court 
House, Vorktown, Williams- 
burg, Fair Oaks, Seven Days' 

Fight 128-139 

Reminiscences — Bull Run and An- 
tietam Campaign 140-141 



4:;l> 



INDEX — Continued. 



R 

Reminiscences — Fredericksburg, 
Marye's Heights and Salem 
Church Campaign .... 142-150 
Reminiscences — Gettysburg Cam- 
paign 151-155 

Reminiscences — Rappahannock 
Station, Mine Run, Brandy Sta- 
tion, Johnson Island .... 156-158 
Reminiscences — North Anna and 

Cold Harbor Campaigns . . 159- 161 
Reminiscences — Petersburg, Fort 
Stevens and Shenandoah Val- 
ley Campaigns 162-169 

Roll of those who died in service, 

23d P. V 180-185 

Record of Officers and Men of the 
23d P. V., 3 years' service . 189-247 

Reunion, Fair Oaks 278-279 

Reunion, Cold Harbor 279 

Reunion, Marye's Heights . . 279-282 

Roe, Jesse R. B 28S 

Reunion, Malvern Hill ... 2S2-285 
Re-dedication of Monument at 

Gettysburg 291-316 

Right and Rear of Little Round 

Top 306 

Rear of Left Centre 310 

Roller, William C, Surg 179 

Rees, Henry, Jr., Maj 179 

Rumney, John . 277 

Roll of those who died in service, 

Companies L. O. P. R. 251-253 

Record of Officers and Men, Cos. 
L. O. P. R. (formerly of the 
23d P. V. ) . . . 254-269 

Reunion " Shaler's Brigade " . 317-374 

s 

Scott, Winfield, Lieut. Gen. ... 7 

Stack Arms ... 27 

Shaw, Zachariah 31 

Sheridan, Philip H., Maj. Gen. . . 40 

Sedgwick, John, Maj. Gen 48 

Shaler's Brigade 56 

Shaler, Alexander, Brig. Gen. . . 67 
Shellady, John .... ... 68 

Schaffer, Anthony 74 

Sweeney, James 77 

Skirmishers . 83 

Speakman, Louis J 115 

Stokley, Joseph ... .... 130 

Song — " 23d at Fair Oaks " . 132 

Smith, Archibald .... .137 

Song — "Seven Days' Fight" . [38-139 
Survivors' Association, 23d P V 271-276 

Sloan, William I ) 274 

Survivors of 23d P. V. at Dedica- 
tion of Monument 292 

Song — " Guard the Flag " . . . .316 
Shinn, ] 1 ... I haplain . .179, 270 

Simon, Frederick P 27", 320 

Sti 11 l<\ Philip 277, 343 

Staigi r, < rottleib ...... 277. 351 

Smallwood, Charles E ; s s 

Sari News ire nn I In- I' 1 1 ml . . 185 
Speni '-. Matthew 337 



S 

Slaysmen, Charles R 345 

Spear, George C, Col 248 

Snowden, Thomas YV 407 

Strenner, Lewis 407 

Survivors of 23d P.V., names and 
addresses 414-421 

T 

Title 2 

Twenty-third P.V., 3 months' ser- 
vice 6-27 

Thomas, George II., Maj. Gen. . . 8 
Twenty-third P. Y., 3 years' ser- 
vice .... 29-247 

Tate, Henry 62 

Tate, James 109 

Taylor, Frank, Capt 124 

"They Drank from the Same 

Canteen " 163 

Table of Killed, Wounded, etc.. 
23d P. \\, 3 years' service . . . 1S6 

Thomas, William 2S5 

" Talking it Over " 301 

"Thoughts of Loved Ones at 

Home" 325 

Tail Piece cut on Soldiers' Letter . 338 
Tribute to the women of the Union 429 

u 

Ups and Downs of Camp Life . . 148 

Uber, William 1 168 

Uber, David H 176 

V 
Volunteer Refreshment Saloon 
and Cooper Shop 105 

w 

Winter Ouarters 32 

Williamson, James G-, Lieut. . . 36 
Wright, Horatio G., Maj. Gen. . . 50 

Webster, Ira 79, 150 

Wash from Same Canteen ... 93 

"Who Wants It?" 97 

Wounded on Skirmish Line ... 98 

Wilson, John 103 

Wilhelm, Charles, Lieut. Col. . 11S 

White, Joseph H 121 

Wood, < ieoi ge, (apt 1 29 

Wray, William 1 178, 270 

Webb, 1 ieorge E 284 

Wallace. William J., Lieut. Col. 179, 270 
Worth, Frank X. . . . . . . 73 

Weeks, Samuel 318 

Whirligig, Camp Graham 361 

\\ arner, Martin 389 

Wilkins, Alexander P 407 

Y 

Vocum, Jacob II 112 

Yeomans, G. W., Asst. Surg . . . 143 

^i 1 'Mir 1 ,. ]< ihn 147 

Z 

Zaun, John 78 



v 1 9 1958